71 found

Year:

  1.  59
    Is Life's Meaning Ultimately Unthinkable?: Guy Bennett-Hunter on the Ineffable.Thaddeus Metz - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (4).
    In this critical notice of Guy Bennett-Hunter’s book _Ineffability and Religious Experience_, I focus on claims he makes about what makes a life meaningful. According to Bennett-Hunter, for human life to be meaningful it must obtain its meaning from what is beyond the human and is ineffable, which constitutes an ultimate kind of meaning. I spell out Bennett-Hunter’s rationale for making this claim, raise some objections to it, and in their wake articulate an alternative conception of ultimate meaning.
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  2.  6
    Three Sosaian Responses and a Wittgensteinian Response to the Dream Argument in the Zhuangzi.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):721-743.
    Ernest Sosa has proposed at least three responses to the dream argument for skepticism in his writings in the past decade. The first and the main purpose of this paper is to critically examine the three Sosaian responses, as well as a Wittgensteinian response Sosa would endorse, by investigating whether they can refute the six different versions of the dream argument found in a passage in the Zhuangzi. The second purpose of this paper is exactly to offer an exposition of (...)
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  3.  15
    Doubting Assertion.Marianna Bergamaschi Ganapini - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):1-13.
    One main argument that has been offered in support of the Knowledge Account of Assertion is that it successfully makes sense of a variety of Moorean-paradoxical claims. David Sosa has objected to the Knowledge Account by arguing that it does not generalize satisfactorily to make sense of the oddity of iterated conjunctions of the form “p but I don’t know whether I know that p”. Recently, Martin Montminy has offered a defense of the Knowledge Account. In this paper, I show (...)
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  4.  6
    Personal Singularity and the Significance of Life.Amihud Gilead - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):775-786.
    The paper proposes to base the notion of the significance of life on the grounds of the singularity of each person as a psychical subject, i.e. personal singularity. No two persons are alike; each one of us, as a person, is intrinsically different from every other person. This personal singularity has a universal significance, namely, it makes a universal difference, whether or not this difference is distinct and acknowledged. Because morality and the significance of a person's life both rely upon (...)
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  5.  14
    Hume, Dispositional Essentialism, and Where to Find the Idea of Necessary Connection.William Hannegan - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):787-791.
    Dispositional essentialists hold that the world is populated by irreducibly dispositional properties, called “potencies,” “powers,” or “dispositions.” Each of these properties is marked out by a characteristic stimulus and manifestation bound together in a metaphysically necessary connection. Dispositional essentialism faces an old objection from David Hume. Hume argues, in his Treatise of Human Nature, that we have no adequate idea of necessary connection. The epistemology of the Treatise allegedly rules the idea out. Dispositional essentialists usually respond by attacking Hume’s epistemology. (...)
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  6.  8
    Non-Elusive Freedom Contextualism.Sofia Jeppsson - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):793-808.
    There are powerful arguments for free will scepticism. However, it seems obvious that some of our actions are done of our own free will. It has been argued that we can solve this puzzle by giving ‘free’ a contextualist analysis. In everyday contexts we are often allowed to ignore sceptical arguments, and can truly say that we acted freely. In the more demanding context of philosophy, it is true that we never do anything freely. Our freedom is elusive; it escapes (...)
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  7.  7
    A Critique of Epistemic Subjectivity.Chien-Te Lin - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):915-920.
    John R. Searle argues that consciousness is a biological problem, and that the subjective feature of consciousness doesn’t exclude the scientific study thereof. In this paper I attempt to show that Searle’s identification of the subjectivity of conscious experience as being merely ontologically subjective, but not epistemically subjective is problematic, as it confuses epistemic subjectivity with axiological subjectivity. Since Searle regards the distinction between epistemic subjectivity and ontological subjectivity as an important basis for scientific studies of consciousness, the unsoundness of (...)
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  8.  13
    Modernity, Postsecularism, Fundamentalism.Péter Losonczi - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):705-720.
    In this essay, I critically examine Habermas’ approach to fundamentalism, a question that explicitly and implicitly alike bears influence on the formation of his postsecular thesis. The overview of his theory is followed by a combined analysis, depending on Torkel Brekke’s sociological study on fundamentalism, on the one hand, and a joint study by Adam Seligman and others in the field of anthropology and social theory. In this regard, questions of sincerity and authenticity are in the focus of my examination, (...)
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  9.  9
    Ways and Means: When Sometimes “Knowledge-First” Epistemology Is Not Epistemology.Brian New - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):827-834.
    I will claim that the distinction Craig French describes between “specific realizations of knowledge” and “means of knowing”, after respective theorisations by Timothy Williamson and Quassim Cassam, can be seen as a faultline between epistemology on the one hand, and the analysis of ordinary language use on the other. The possibility of this disjunction, I believe, raises the question as to whether the latter kind of analysis has anything to contribute to epistemology at all. Cassam’s “explanatory” conception of ways of (...)
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  10.  37
    Refutations of the Two Pessimistic Inductions.Seungbae Park - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):835-844.
    Both the pessimistic inductions over scientific theories and over scientists are built upon what I call proportional pessimism: as theories are discarded, the inductive rationale for concluding that the next theories will be discarded grows stronger. I argue that proportional pessimism clashes with the fact that present theories are more successful than past theories, and with the implications of the assumptions that there are finitely and infinitely many unconceived alternatives. Therefore, the two pessimistic inductions collapse along with proportional pessimism.
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  11.  6
    Theoretical Childhood and Adulthood: Plato’s Account of Human Intellectual Development.Susanna Saracco - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):845-863.
    The Platonic description of the cognitive development of the human being is a crucial part of his philosophy. This account emphasizes not only the existence of phases of rational growth but also the need that the cognitive progress of the individuals is investigated further. I will reconstruct what rational growth is for Plato in light of the deliberate choice of the philosopher to leave incomplete his schematization of human intellectual development. I will argue that this is a means chosen by (...)
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  12.  9
    Is the United States Phenomenally Conscious? Reply to Kammerer.Eric Schwitzgebel - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):877-883.
    In Schwitzgebel I argued that the United States, considered as a concrete entity with people as some or all of its parts, meets plausible materialistic criteria for consciousness. Kammerer defends materialism against this seemingly unintuitive conclusion by means of an “anti-nesting principle” according to which group entities cannot be literally phenomenally conscious if they contain phenomenally conscious subparts who stand in a certain type of functional relation to the group as a whole. I raise three concerns about Kammerer’s view. First, (...)
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  13.  35
    Evolutionary Debunking Arguments and the Moral Niche.Eleonora Severini - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):865-875.
    The so-called Evolutionary Debunking Arguments are arguments that appeal to the evolutionary genealogy of our beliefs to undermine their justification. When applied to morality, such arguments are intended to undermine moral realism. In this paper I will discuss Andreas Mogensen’s recent effort to secure moral realism against EDAs. Mogensen attempts to undermine the challenge provided by EDAs in metaethics through the distinction between proximate and ultimate causes in biology. The problem with this move is that the proximate/ultimate distinction is misconceived. (...)
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  14.  6
    Introduction: Rethinking Fundamentalism in a Post-Secular Age.Aakash Singh - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):649-653.
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  15.  6
    Dedication.Aakash Singh - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):645-647.
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  16.  6
    Logrolling, Earmarking, and Vote Buying.James Stacy Taylor - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):905-913.
    In an important and provocative paper Christopher Freiman recently has defended the view that vote-buying should be legal in democratic societies. Freiman offers four arguments in support of this claim: that vote buying would be ex ante beneficial to both the buyers and sellers of votes; that voters enjoy wide discretion in how they use their votes, and so this should extend to selling them; that vote markets would lead to electoral outcomes that better reflect voters’ preferences; and that vote-buying (...)
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  17.  12
    The Balanced Nation: Islam and the Challenges of Extremism, Fundamentalism, Islamism and Jihadism.Charlie Winter & Usama Hasan - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):667-688.
    As will be made clear below, the terms extremism, fundamentalism, Islamism and Jihadism are often used interchangeably by the public, something that has negative implications for both the integration of the Muslim community into Western society, and the efficacy of counter-extremism efforts. This paper aims to provide working for these terms by understanding them independent from their misinformed socio-political contexts, and by determining how they relate to one another in what will be identified as a series of conceptual subsets. In (...)
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  18.  19
    The Symmetry Argument Against the Deprivation Account.Huiyuhl Yi - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):947-959.
    Here I respond to Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer’s “The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi.” They developed an influential strategy in defense of the deprivation account of death’s badness against the Lucretian symmetry problem. The core of their argument consists in the claim that it is rational for us to welcome future intrinsic goods while being indifferent to past intrinsic goods. Previously, I argued that their approach is compatible with the evil of late birth insofar as an (...)
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  19.  21
    The Principle of Alternate Possibilities as Sufficient but Not Necessary for Moral Responsibility: A Way to Avoid the Frankfurt Counter-Example.Garry Young - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):961-969.
    The aim of this paper is to present a version of the principle of alternate possibilities which is not susceptible to the Frankfurt-style counter-example. I argue that PAP does not need to be endorsed as a necessary condition for moral responsibility and, in fact, presenting PAP as a sufficient condition maintains its usefulness as a maxim for moral accountability whilst avoiding Frankfurt-style counter-examples. In addition, I provide a further sufficient condition for moral responsibility – the twin world condition – and (...)
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  20.  32
    Nonexistent Objects as Truth-Makers: Against Crane’s Reductionism.Filippo Casati & Naoya Fujikawa - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):423-434.
    According to Meinongianism, some objects do not exist but we can legitimately refer to and quantify over them. Moreover, Meinongianism standardly regards nonexistent objects as contributing to the truth-makers of sentences about nonexistent objects. Recently, Tim Crane has proposed a weak form of Meinongianism, a reductionism, which denies any contribution of nonexistent objects to truth-making. His reductionism claims that, even though we can truly talk about nonexistent objects by using singular terms and quantifiers about them, any truth about nonexistent objects (...)
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  21.  12
    Is the Humean Defeated by Induction? A Reply to Smart.Eduardo Castro - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):435-446.
    This paper is a reply to Benjamin Smart’s : 319–332, 2013) recent objections to David Armstrong’s solution to the problem of induction : 503–511, 1991). To solve the problem of induction, Armstrong contends that laws of nature are the best explanation of our observed regularities, where laws of nature are dyadic relations of necessitation holding between first-order universals. Smart raises three objections against Armstrong’s pattern of inference. First, regularities can explain our observed regularities; that is, universally quantified conditionals are required (...)
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  22.  3
    ‘Determinism’ Is Just Fine: A Reply to Scott Sehon.Gabriel De Marco - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):469-477.
    Scott Sehon recently argued that the standard notion of determinism employed in the Consequence Argument makes it so that, if our world turns out to be deterministic, then an interventionist God is logically impossible. He further argues that because of this, we should revise our notion of determinism. In this paper I show that Sehon’s argument for the claim that the truth of determinism, in this sense, would make an interventionist God logically impossible ultimately fails. I then offer and respond (...)
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  23.  2
    Human Life in the War on Terrorism: A Response to “the Risk Dilemma” by Michael Walzer.Asa Kasher & Amos Yadlin - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):295-308.
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  24.  16
    Revenge as the Dark Double of Retributive Punishment.Whitley R. P. Kaufman - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):317-325.
    It is an assumption widely shared by both retributivists and anti-retributivists that revenge is a morally impermissible basis for inflicting harm. Retributivists have thus exercised great ingenuity in demonstrating that retribution is fundamentally different from revenge. But this is, I argue, to misconstrue the problem. The problem is rather to recognize the essential continuity between revenge and retribution, and to address the question whether there is a moral basis for the very idea of inflicting harm in response to moral wrongdoing. (...)
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  25.  25
    Blocking Blockage.Ken Levy - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):565-583.
    The Blockage Argument is designed to improve upon Harry Frankfurt’s famous argument against the Principle of Alternative Possibilities by removing the counterfactual intervener altogether. If the argument worked, then it would prove in a way that Frankfurt’s argument does not that moral responsibility does not require any alternative possibilities whatsoever, not even the weakest “flicker of freedom”. -/- Some philosophers have rejected the Blockage Argument solely on the basis of their intuition that the inability to do otherwise is incompatible with (...)
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  26.  3
    Erratum To: Blocking Blockage.Ken Levy - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):583-583.
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  27.  6
    Introduction to Ethics of Forgiveness and Revenge.Krisanna M. Scheiter - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):313-315.
    The papers collected in this volume were first presented at a workshop entitled Ethics of Forgiveness and Revenge, which was held May 22-23, 2014 at Union College in Schenectady, New York. The papers cover a range of topics, including the rightness and wrongness of vengeance and forgiveness, who has the standing to avenge or forgive, the relationship between retributive punishment and revenge, and the role apology plays in determining correct punishment. The papers in this volume are not only philosophically interesting, (...)
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  28.  7
    The Risk Dilemma.Michael Walzer - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):289-293.
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  29.  4
    Response to Asa Kasher and Amos Yadlin.Michael Walzer - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):309-311.
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  30. Zebras, Intransigence & Semantic Apocalypse: Problems for Dispositional Metasemantics.James Andow - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):53-62.
    Complete information dispositional metasemantics says that our expressions get their meaning in virtue of what our dispositions to apply those terms would be given complete information. The view has recently been advanced and argued to have a number of attractive features. I argue that that it threatens to make the meanings of our words indeterminate and doesn’t do what it was that made a dispositional view attractive in the first place.
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  31.  11
    Is Objective Consequentialism Compatible with the Principle That “Ought” Implies “Can”?Vuko Andrić - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):63-77.
    Some philosophers hold that objective consequentialism is false because it is incompatible with the principle that “ought” implies “can”. Roughly speaking, objective consequentialism is the doctrine that you always ought to do what will in fact have the best consequences. According to the principle that “ought” implies “can”, you have a moral obligation to do something only if you can do that thing. Frances Howard-Snyder has used an innovative thought experiment to argue that sometimes you cannot do what will in (...)
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  32.  16
    Dummett on Bringing About the Past.Brian Garrett - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):113-115.
    In ‘Bringing about the Past’ Michael Dummett attempted to defend the coherence of the idea of bringing about the past. I agree that bringing about the past is conceptually no more problematic than bringing about the future, but argue, against Dummett, that there is no need to restrict the scope of an agent’s knowledge in order to make sense of intentionally bringing about past events.
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  33.  17
    Wittgensteinian Pragmatism in Humean Concepts.David Hommen - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):117-135.
    David Hume’s and later Ludwig Wittgenstein’s views on concepts are generally presented as standing in stark opposition to each other. In a nutshell, Hume’s theory of concepts is taken to be subjectivistic and atomistic, while Wittgenstein is metonymic with a broadly pragmatistic and holistic doctrine that gained much attention during the second half of the 20th century. In this essay, I shall argue, however, that Hume’s theory of concepts is indeed much more akin to the views of Wittgenstein and his (...)
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  34. On the Puzzle of the Changing Past.Andrea Iacona - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):137-142.
    In the intriguing article The puzzle of the changing past, Barlassina and Del Prete argue that, if one grants a platitude about truth and accepts a simple story that they tell, one is forced to conclude that the past has changed. I will suggest that there is a coherent way to resist that conclusion. The platitude about truth is in fact a platitude, but the story is not exactly as they tell it.
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  35.  30
    Are We All Little Eichmanns?Gary James Jason - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):1-13.
    In this review essay, I review in detail Abram de Swann's fine new book, The Killing Compartments. The book is a theoretical analysis of the varieties and causes of genocides and other mass asymmetrical killing campaigns. I then suggest several criticisms of his analysis.
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  36.  29
    Defending Priority Views From the Gunk/Junk Argument.Naoaki Kitamura - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):155-165.
    Recently, Jonathan Tallant has argued that we should reject priority views, which hold that some objects are fundamental and others are dependent. Tallant’s argument relies on two proposed mereological possibilities: a gunky world, where everything has a proper part, and a junky world, where everything is a proper part. In this paper, I criticise Tallant’s argument and argue that neither of these possibilities threaten priority views per se; at most, they threaten only particular forms of priority views that contain a (...)
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  37.  32
    Schizophrenia and Moral Responsibility: A Kantian Essay.Matthé Scholten - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):205-225.
    In this paper, I give a Kantian answer to the question whether and why it would be inappropriate to blame people suffering from mental disorders that fall within the schizophrenia spectrum. I answer this question by reconstructing Kant’s account of mental disorder, in particular his explanation of psychotic symptoms. Kant explains these symptoms in terms of various types of cognitive impairment. I show that this explanation is plausible and discuss Kant’s claim that the unifying feature of the symptoms is the (...)
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  38.  9
    A Modulation Account of Negative Existentials.David C. Spewak Jr - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):227-245.
    Fictional characters present a problem for semantic theorists. One approach to this problem has been to maintain realism regarding fictional characters, that is to claim that fictional characters exist. In this way names originating from fiction have designata. On this approach the problem of negative existentials is more pressing than it might otherwise be since an explanation must be given as to why we judge them true when the names occurring within them designate existing objects. So, realists must explain the (...)
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  39.  71
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason Defended: There Is No Conjunction of All Contingently True Propositions.Christopher M. P. Tomaszewski - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):267-274.
    Toward the end of his classic treatise An Essay on Free Will, Peter van Inwagen offers a modal argument against the Principle of Sufficient Reason which he argues shows that the principle “collapses all modal distinctions.” In this paper, a critical flaw in this argument is shown to lie in van Inwagen’s beginning assumption that there is such a thing as the conjunction of all contingently true propositions. This is shown to follow from Cantor’s theorem and a property of conjunction (...)
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  40.  22
    Consenting Adults, Sex, and Natural Law Theory.Timothy Hsiao - 2016 - Philosophia 43:1-21.
    This paper argues for the superiority of natural law theory over consent -based approaches to sexual morality. I begin by criticizing the “consenting adults” sexual ethic that is dominant in contemporary Western culture. I then argue that natural law theory provides a better account of sexual morality. In particular, I will defend the “perverted faculty argument”, according to which it is immoral to use one’s bodily faculties contrary to their proper end.
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  41.  5
    Book Review Of: E. Butler, Classical Liberalism: A Primer. [REVIEW]Gary James Jason - 2016 - Philosophia 9:1-9.
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  42.  1
    Mad Mothers, Bad Mothers, and What a “Good” Mother Would Do: The Ethics of Ambivalence by Sarah LaChance Adams.Lisa Baraitser - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):273-278.
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  43.  1
    The Returns of Antigone: Interdisciplinary Essays Ed. By Tina Chanter, Sean D. Kirkland.Benninger Elizabeth - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):285-291.
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  44.  1
    Not Like a Native Speaker: On Language as a Postcolonial Experience by Rey Chow.Carli Coetzee - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):292-296.
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  45.  1
    Foucault’s Sad Heterotopology of the Body.Verena Erlenbusch - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):171-194.
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  46.  1
    Beyond Accommodation: Disability, Feminist Philosophy, and the Design of Everyday Academic Life.Hamraie Aimi - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):259-271.
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  47.  1
    Emotional Orientations: Simone de Beauvoir and Sara Ahmed on Subjectivity and the Emotional Phenomenology of Gender.John McMahon - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):215-240.
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  48.  1
    Gut Feminism by Elizabeth A. Wilson.Astrida Neimanis - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):307-312.
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  49.  1
    Service Dogs: Between Animal Studies and Disability Studies.Kelly Oliver - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):241-258.
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  50.  1
    Gloria Anzaldúa and the Problem of Violence Against Women.John Kaiser Ortiz - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):195-213.
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  51.  1
    The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson.Gayle Salamon - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):303-306.
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  52.  1
    Head Cases: Julia Kristeva on Philosophy and Art in Depressed Times by Elaine P. Miller.Amy Ray Stewart - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):297-302.
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  53. Postcolonial Reason and Its Critique: Deliberations on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak’s Thoughts Ed. By Purushottama Bilimoria, Dina Al-Kassim.Christopher Taylor - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (2):279-284.
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  54.  1
    Making Sense of Intersex: Changing Ethical Perspectives in Biomedicine by Ellen K. Feder.Erika Alm - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):161-165.
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  55.  2
    Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism by Shannon Sullivan.Alison Bailey - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):142-145.
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  56.  1
    Beyond Queer Disavowal to Building Abolition.Owen Daniel-McCarter, Erica R. Meiners & R. Noll - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):109-123.
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  57.  1
    The Perils and Privileges of Vulnerability: Intersectionality, Relationality, and the Injustices of the U.S. Prison Nation.Erinn Gilson - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):43-59.
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  58.  1
    Introduction: Queer, Trans, and Feminist Responses to the Prison Nation.Lisa Guenther & Chloë Taylor - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):1-8.
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  59.  1
    Knowing Otherwise: Race, Gender, and Implicit Understanding by Alexis Shotwell.Lauren Guilmette - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):137-141.
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  60.  1
    Testo Junkie: Sex, Drugs, and Biopolitics in the Pharmacopornographic Era by Paul B. Preciado.Sarah K. Hansen - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):166-170.
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  61.  1
    Once There Was No Prison Rape: Ending Sexual Violence as Strategy for Prison Abolition.Jason M. Lydon - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):61-71.
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  62.  1
    Everyday Utopias: The Conceptual Life of Promising Spaces by Davina Cooper.G. Martin Deborah - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):146-150.
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  63.  1
    Dehumanized Denizens, Displayed Animals: Prison Tourism and the Discourse of the Zoo.Kelly Struthers Montford - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):73-91.
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  64.  1
    Habeas Viscus: Racializing Assemblages, Biopolitics, and Black Feminist Theories of the Human by Alexander G. Weheliye.Amber Jamilla Musser - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):156-160.
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  65.  1
    “Something Else to Be”: A Chicana Survivor’s Journey From Vigilante Justice to Transformative Justice.Palacios Lena - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):93-108.
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  66.  1
    Disability Incarcerated: Imprisonment and Disability in the United States and Canada Ed. By Allison C. Carey, Liat Ben-Moshe, Chris Chapman.Pierre Joshua St - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):125-128.
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  67.  1
    Skin Acts: Race, Psychoanalysis, and the Black Male Performer by Michelle Ann Stephens.Jared Sexton - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):151-155.
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  68.  1
    Active Intolerance: Michel Foucault, the Prisons Information Group, and the Future of Abolition Ed. By Andrew Dilts, Perry Zurn.Paul D. G. Showler - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):129-132.
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  69.  1
    The Ethics of Captivity Ed. By Lori Gruen.Rebecca Tuvel - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):133-136.
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  70.  1
    The Politics of Anonymity: Foucault, Feminism, and Gender Non-Conforming Prisoners.Perry Zurn - 2016 - Philosophia 6 (1):27-42.
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    A Pluralist Account of Knowledge as a Natural Kind.Andreas Stephens - 2016 - Philosophia:1-19.
    In an attempt to address some long-standing issues of epistemology, Hilary Kornblith proposes that knowledge is a natural kind the identification of which is the unique responsibility of one particular science: cognitive ethology. As Kornblith sees it, the natural kind thus picked out is knowledge as construed by reliabilism. Yet the claim that cognitive ethology has this special role has not convinced all critics. The present article argues that knowledge plays a causal and explanatory role within many of our more (...)
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