Philosophia Christi

ISSN: 1529-1634

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  1.  16
    Contemporary Arguments in Natural Theology: God and Rational Belief, ed. Colin Ruloff and Peter Horban.James N. Anderson - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):329-334.
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  2.  9
    Miracles, Causation, and Critical Biblical Scholarship.Joel Archer - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):249-258.
    Most historical Jesus scholars agree that Jesus was regarded by his contemporaries as a great miracle worker. However, many of these same scholars deny that they can pronounce on the truth of the miracle stories as historians. There are at least two arguments for this position. One is based on an alleged empirical constraint on historical practice, which excludes divine causation. The other argument is rooted in the presumption that it is anachronistic to impose modern understandings of miracles on ancient (...)
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  3.  11
    Fallenness and Flourishing, Hud Hudson.Michael Austin - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):338-341.
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  4.  17
    The Implications of Religious Peer Disagreement for Religious Epistemology.James Beilby - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):193-201.
    In Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God, Harold Netland offers a helpful, balanced approach to the epistemology of religious experience. The value of Netland’s volume notwithstanding, I offer a critique of Netland’s claims regarding the identification of epistemic peers, the epistemic implications of religious peer disagreement, and the viability of the demand for additional evidence as a response to instances of peer disagreement.
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  5.  9
    Divine Holiness and Divine Action, Mark C. Murphy.Christopher Michael Cloos - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):334-338.
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  6.  8
    Seemings, Virtue, and Acquired Contemplation.Thomas Duttweiler - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):297-316.
    Sarah Coakley, drawing on the insights of John of the Cross, has recently argued that God may have redemptive moral and epistemic purposes in remaining hidden from people during a “dark night of the soul,” and that experiences of spiritual darkness can be taken as a mode of religious experience. In this paper, I explore what sort of epistemic model of religious experience is needed to underwrite Coakley’s argument. I argue that one influential externalist model—that of William Alston—is unsatisfactory, and (...)
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  7.  24
    Who Are You, Really?, Joshua Rasmussen.Joshua R. Farris - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):324-329.
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  8.  7
    Causation and Divine Agency.Gregory E. Ganssle - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):239-248.
    God’s regular causal activity is traditionally held to include his creation of the world, his conserving all created things in being and his concurrence with the causal activities of finite causes. Divine causation requires that God is an agent. In this paper, I apply E. J. Lowe’s view of human agency to God. This application requires certain adjustments. Lowe takes it that when a person acts for reasons, these reasons are lacks of some kind. I argue that his account can (...)
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  9.  24
    Seemings and Defeat by Disagreement in the Case of Religious Experience.R. Douglas Geivett - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):181-191.
    Exploiting the resources of phenomenal conservatism, Harold Netland has offered a “critical-trust” approach to assessing the veridicality of religious experience and to ascertaining its evidential force in relation to Christian theistic belief. I suggest that, if we give seemings carried in religious experience their epistemic due, it may turn out that religious experience is practically universal and that the potential defeat of justification for religious belief by disagreement among purported epistemic peers is itself defeated by the private character of seemings (...)
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  10.  12
    Divine Causation.Keith Hess - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):215-219.
    This essay introduces Philosophia Christi’s symposium on the book, Philosophical Essays on Divine Causation, edited by Greg Ganssle. A short review of each essay in the symposium follows. A call is given for Christian philosophers to take divine causation into account while doing research in their primary area of philosophy. These updated and expanded essays were first presented in a more limited form at the 2023 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association.
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  11.  7
    Classical Theism: New Essays on the Metaphysics of God, ed. Jonathan Fuqua and Robert C. Koons.Andrew Hollingsworth - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):319-324.
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  12.  9
    Editor’s Introduction.Ross D. Inman - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):155-155.
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  13.  12
    Causation, Creaturely and Divine.Angus J. L. Menuge - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):221-229.
    A biblical approach to reconciling God’s sovereignty with creaturely responsibility should avoid the extremes of global occasionalism and completely autonomous creatures. This paper evaluates the standard intermediary solutions offered by conservationists and concurrentists. It argues that while each contributes insights which a satisfactory account should retain, none is fully adequate. Even Leibniz’s sophisticated response, which accounts for providence, miracles, and moral responsibility, unacceptably abridges creaturely power to implement decisions. My alternative proposal seeks to explain how creatures can retain full responsibility (...)
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  14.  13
    Experiencing the World as Godless.Dolores G. Morris - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):169-179.
    In Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God, Harold Netland advances a critical-trust approach to religious experience. This approach raises important questions about what Michael Martin has called “negative religious experiences.” Netland responds by attacking Martin’s “negative principle of credulity,” but I argue that Netland’s response can be undermined if we take negative religious experiences not as experiences of God as absent, but as experiences of the world as godless. On this understanding, there is no need for a negative principle (...)
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  15.  10
    We Have the Mind of Christ.Paul K. Moser - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):261-280.
    Religious epistemology can benefit from the widely neglected perspective of the apostle Paul that humans can “have the mind of Christ.” This article considers whether humans can apprehend divine reality, if only partly, from a divine vantage point. Perhaps humans then can apprehend the reality and goodness of God in a salient manner, thereby gaining a vital perspective on ultimate reality. The article aims to identify the viability of a “God’s-eye standpoint” for humans in “the mind of Christ.” It contends (...)
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  16.  13
    Experiencing God and Religious Disagreement.Harold A. Netland - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):203-211.
    There is much in the responses by Dolores Morris, Doug Geivett, and Jim Beilby with which I fully agree. But here I try to clarify a few issues and to identify points where we might simply disagree. I focus on the issue of those who experience the world as godless (Dolores); broadening the definition of religious experience (Dolores and Doug); suggested revisions of the argument from fulfilled expectations (Dolores); and especially the vexing questions associated with epistemic peer disagreement (Jim and (...)
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  17.  12
    Précis: Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God.Harold A. Netland - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):163-167.
    Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God is concerned with questions about the degree to which and the ways in which religious experiences, especially theistic experiences, can provide epistemic support for Christian beliefs. I adopt a critical trust approach to religious experiences and argue that, with appropriate qualifications, it can be reasonable for someone to believe that he or she has had a veridical experience of God and that this can provide some evidential support for certain Christian claims.
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  18.  14
    Symposium on Harold Netland’s Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God.Bradley N. Seeman - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):159-161.
    At the 2022 national meeting of the American Academy of Religion, the Evangelical Philosophical Society sponsored an exchange between Harold Netland, Jim Beilby, Doug Geivett, and Dolores Morris around Netland’s 2022 book, Religious Experience and the Knowledge of God. I briefly orient readers to the resulting Philosophia Christi symposium by saying a few words introducing Harold Netland and some key themes in his argument that a “critical trust” approach to religious experience offers modest—but significant—epistemic support for Christian belief and practice.
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  19.  22
    The Problem of Necessitism.Drew Smith - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):281-295.
    In his 2013 monograph Modal Logic as Metaphysics, Timothy Williamson develops and defends a view he terms necessitism. According to necessitism, everything that exists does so necessarily (alternatively, necessarily everything is necessarily something). I demonstrate that necessitism is incompatible with the conjunction of two doctrines rooted in the broadly Nicene tradition: God’s metaphysical sovereignty and freedom. First, I exposit and formalize the two doctrines in question. Next, I expound Williamson’s theory of necessitism. Third, I demonstrate the formal incompatibility of the (...)
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  20.  10
    What Efficacious Divine Action Need Not Be.David A. Vander Laan - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (2):231-237.
    Arguments concerning divine conservation and concurrence often assume that actions of certain descriptions would be superfluous if God were to perform them, and it is then concluded that God does not perform such actions. In particular, it often seems that atomic actions cannot be the result of cooperative activity between God and creatures since there is no apparent way to divide the labor between the two. However, the actions that are atomic in one model of divine action may not be (...)
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  21.  27
    Review of Copan and Jamison, What Would Jesus Really Eat? [REVIEW]Joel Ballivian - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):91-103.
    Paul Copan and Wes Jamison’s recent book, What Would Jesus Really Eat?, attempts to offer moral and theological vindication for the factory farm industry and, more generally, for eating animals. It thereby aims to provide “comfort” for Christians to “overlook animal suffering” and, if they choose, to continue eating factory-farmed meat. In this review, I argue that various key arguments in the book rest on questionable premises and elide relevant distinctions. As a result the key thesis of the book—that Christians (...)
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  22.  16
    Benjamin H. Arbour, ed., Philosophical Essays against Open Theism.Thomas W. Duttweiler - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):132-136.
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  23.  29
    How Literature Educates the Emotions.Christopher E. Franklin - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):7-26.
    I aim to show that the practice of reading excellent literature is an excellent form of moral education. I offer a two-stage defense. First, I call attention to central features of the human self (especially the emotions) involved in moral growth. I argue that the central components of emotions are construals (or ways of seeing) and loves. Second, I show that literature has distinctive resources both to train our construals by affording us practice in seeing the world in new ways (...)
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  24.  11
    William Wood, Analytic Theology and the Academic Study of Religion.Andrew Hollingsworth - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):136-140.
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  25.  9
    Editor’s Introduction.Ross D. Inman - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):3-4.
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  26.  20
    Decretalism Is (Still) Not Occasionalism.Jeffrey Koperski - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):117-125.
    In “Koperski’s New (Improved?) Decretalism,” Robert Larmer argues that my version of nomological realism about the laws of nature logically entails occasionalism. Here I clarify and defend my view against this charge. The main disagreement is whether a proper account of the laws of nature must involve dynamic production—what is commonly called oomph.
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  27.  21
    Koperski’s New (Improved?) Decretalism.Robert A. Larmer - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):105-116.
    In “Breaking Laws of Nature” published in this journal in 2017, Jeffrey Koperski defended a position he termed “decretalism” in which he claimed that the laws of nature should be understood as the decrees of God. In “Decretalism and the Laws of Nature” also published in this journal in 2017, I argued that Koperski’s decretalism amounts to occasionalism. In his recent book, Divine Action, Determinism, and the Laws of Nature, Koperski has responded to my criticisms by changing his account of (...)
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  28.  21
    Creation and Modality.Samuel Lebens - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):45-59.
    Ryan Mullins argues that, assuming Hassidic Idealism, God is forced to create all possible worlds (either as a single all-inclusive multiverse, or as an exhaustive array of discrete possible worlds, no one of which is more inherently actual than the other). This process, because unfree, doesn’t amount to creation so much as emanation. I argue that there are numerous ways to reconcile Hassidic Idealism with a robust doctrine of a free Divine creation ex nihilo. We must distinguish between a God (...)
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  29.  38
    Theism Does Not Give Birth to Idealism.R. T. Mullins - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):27-44.
    Sam Lebens offers an intriguing set of arguments from theism to idealism. In this paper, I shall focus on the argument from perfect rationality to Hassidic Idealism. I will offer a critical analysis of this argument and draw out a series of conflicts between Hassidic Idealism and divine freedom, the divine ideas, and creation ex nihilo.
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  30.  93
    Analyzing Leidenhag’s Minding Creation.Matthew Owen - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):77-89.
    Joanna Leidenhag’s research monograph Minding Creation: Theological Panpsychism and the Doctrine of Creation argues that theologians should seriously consider and perhaps even support panpsychism. In light of rekindled interest in panpsychism amongst philosophers of mind and a noteworthy minority of cognitive neuroscientists, which comes in the wake of physicalism’s faltering, Leidenhag’s thesis is timely. This work briefly analyzes some key aspects of Minding Creation.
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  31.  23
    The X-Claim Debunking Argument and Theistic Mooreanism.Colin Ruloff - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):61-73.
    According to Stephen Law’s “X-claim argument,” the theist’s acquiring (what I call) an “x-claim defeater” automatically provides the theist with a reason to give up her x-claim belief. Contrary to Law, I argue that, even if the theist acquires such a defeater, it does not follow that the theist ought to give up her x-claim belief. This is because the degree of justification possessed by the theist’s belief may be sufficient to epistemically insulate itself against the x-claim defeater that was (...)
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  32.  13
    Mario De Caro and Maria Silvia Vaccarezza, eds., Practical Wisdom: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives.K. Lauriston Smith - 2023 - Philosophia Christi 25 (1):129-132.
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