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  1.  2
    Aristotle’s Nicomachean Function Argument.David Charles - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):95-104.
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  2.  1
    The Seperation of the Soul From Body in Plato’s Phaedo.Thomas Kjeller Johansen - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):17-28.
    The view that the soul can exist separately from the body is commonly associated with dualism. Since Plato’s Phaedo argues that the soul is immortal and survives the death of the body, there seems to be reason to call Plato, in that dialogue at least, a ‘dualist’. Yet, as we know, there are many kinds of dualism, so we have thereby not said very much. Let me therefore start with some distinctions. First of all, we can distinguish between two kinds (...)
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  3. Hypotheses in Plato’s Memo.Lindsay Judson - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):29-39.
    I investigate the epistemic status of the hypotheses and other premises used in Socrates’ ‘arguments from a hypothesis’ in the Meno, and of the conclusions drawn from them, and argue that, while they are taken by Socrates to fall short of knowledge, he takes them all to have a positive epistemic status, and is not committed to advancing them only tentatively.
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  4. Parmenides and the Origins of Greek Philosophy.Charles Kahn - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):105-112.
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  5. Aristotle on Casual Determinism and Fatalism.Christos Y. Panayides - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):41-53.
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  6. Metaphysics A.7, 988b16-21.Michail Peramatzis - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):55-65.
    The last six lines of Aristotle's Metaphysics A.7 draw some important conclusions about Aristotle's predecessors' grasp of the four types of cause. Aristotle argues that his account of his predecessors supports his conception of the four causes and his claim that in first philosophy, too, we should seek to understand our subject-matter on the basis of these four causes. I offer a detailed textual and philosophical interpretation of these lines, connect them with Aristotle's argument in Metaphysics A.1-6, and examine their (...)
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  7. Tackling Aristotle’s Notion of the Will.Christof Rapp - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):67-79.
    Although Aristotle’s name is regularly mentioned when it comes to the question of where the notion of the will historically derives from and although one of the most influential exponents of philosophical theories of the will, Thomas Aquinas, seems to think that he is just applying the Aristotelian theory, many historians of philosophy explicitly deny that Aristotle had a notion of the will. If we think that the notion of the will is among the notions that have been gradually developed (...)
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  8. Sharing a Property.Theodore Scaltsas - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):3-16.
    The Socratic discussion in the Hippias Major, 300-303, is not a passing comment on plural reference; it is a theory of plural subjecthood. It has escaped attention because it is a small part of a larger complex argument on the topic of which pleasures are fine. Socrates’s theory is further concealed by the fact that it is presented as an antithesis between Hippias and himself, whereas in fact, Hippias’s position becomes part of Socrates’s theory. I begin by examining Hippias’s position, (...)
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  9. The Puzzles of the ‘Master Argument’ and Their Solutions.Gerhard Seel - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (2-3):81-93.
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  10.  1
    Review of the Fundamentals of Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Alberto Abadia - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):127-133.
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  11.  1
    Why One’s Practical Reasons Are Not Just One’s Own Private Affair.Stefano Bertea - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):63-85.
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  12.  1
    Ultimate Questions.Geoff Boucher - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):50-62.
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  13.  2
    Hume’s Problem of Enumerative Induction Reconsidered.D. Christopoulou, D. Anapolitanos & M. Alexiadou - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):86-97.
    This paper addresses Harman’s approach to enumerative induction as a case of inference to the best explanation. Αfter taking under brief consideration Hume’s critique to induction, the paper argues that Harman’s proposal does not improve the situation since the same characteristics of induction and the kind of skepticism associated with it reappear in case of inference to the best explanation. Then the paper questions Armstrong’s attempt to upgrade Harman’s suggestion by regarding a necessitation relation among two universals as the best (...)
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  14. The Syntax of Proper Names.Enrico Cipriani - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):98-110.
    In this paper, I will focus on the debate between descriptivism and antidescriptivism theory about proper names. In Section I, I will propose an historical reconstruction of the debate, and I will focus in particular on Russell and Kripke's treatments of proper names. Some criticisms will be advanced against Kripke's hypothesis of rigid-designator and, more clearly, against the consequent distinction between the epistemic and metaphysical level that Kripke proposes to explain identity assertions between proper names. Furthermore, I will argue, that, (...)
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  15. For the Love of Poetic Beauty.Andrew Cooper - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):111-126.
    It is a well-worn trope to view Plato’s banishment of the poets in Republic as a crude form of philistinism. In this paper I defend Plato against this charge. I argue that Republic does not present a final view of poetry, for it leaves room for a philosophical love of poetic beauty. First I analyse the political nature of Plato’s critique of poetry. I suggest that Plato does not reject the political order of change and decay, but opens space for (...)
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  16. Three Remarks on “Reflective Equilibrium“.Dietmar Hübner - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):11-40.
    John Rawls’ “reflective equilibrium” ranges amongst the most popular conceptions in contemporary ethics when it comes to the basic methodological question of how to justify and trade off different normative positions and attitudes. Even where Rawls’ specific contractualist account is not adhered to, “reflective equilibrium” is readily adopted as the guiding idea of coherentist approaches, seeking moral justification not in a purely deductive or inductive manner, but in some balancing procedure that will eventually procure a stable adjustment of relevant doctrines (...)
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  17. Cosmopolitan Modernity. [REVIEW]Klinkisch Eva-Maria & Patsi Eirini - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):134-138.
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  18.  1
    Around God Everything Becomes World.Mateo Pietropaoli - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):41-49.
    The article aims to show the peculiar relationship in Nietzsche’s moral thought between the notions of will and life, on the one hand, and of conscience and truth, on the other. Central to any understanding of this relation is the concept of world, which represents the manifestation of a founding and unconscious will to power, namely the constant generation of a horizon of sense. Recalling several passages from Nietzsche’s works, the article expounds the possibility of a moral thought focused on (...)
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  19. Kant’s Platonism.Nicholas Rescher - 2017 - Philosophical Inquiry 41 (1):2-10.
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