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  1.  6
    The Humean Notion of Sympathy.Dionysios A. Anapolitanos - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):151-158.
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  2.  12
    Locke on Language, Meaning and Communication.Alexiadou Anastasia-Sofia - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):159-166.
  3.  7
    Digital Humanities and Hermeneutics.W. Balzer, A. Eleftheriadis & D. Kurzawe - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):103-119.
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  4.  17
    The Concept of Catharsis in Aristotle's Poetics.Grigoriou Christos - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):167-179.
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  5.  6
    A Value Argument Against Incompatibilism.Justin Mc Brayer - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):138-150.
    Incompatibilism is the view that free will is incompatible with determinism. Combatibilism is the view that free will is compatible with determinism. The debate between the two positions is seemingly intractable. However, just as elsewhere in philosophy, leveraging assumptions about value can offer progress. A promising value argument against incompatibilism is as follows: given facts about both human psychology and the value of free will, incompatibilism is false. This is because we would want our choices to be free but we (...)
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  6.  9
    Aristotle and the Thesis of Mereological Potentialism.Christian Pfeiffer - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):28-66.
    According to Aristotle, the way in which the parts of a whole are is different from the way in which the whole exists. Parts of an object are only potentially, whereas the whole exists actually. Although commentators agree that Aristotle held this doctrine, little effort has been made to spell out precisely what it could mean to say that the parts are only potentially. In this paper, I shall attempt to elucidate that claim and explain the philosophical motivation behind it. (...)
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  7.  12
    Economic Inequalities and Justice: Plato and Rawls.Gerasimos Santas - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):2-27.
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  8.  4
    The “Philosophy-Ladenness” of Perception.Mika Suojanen - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):83-102.
    The basic entity in phenomenology is the phenomenon. Knowing the phenomenon is another issue. The phenomenon has been described as the real natural object or the appearance directly perceived in phenomenology and analytic philosophy of perception. Within both traditions, philosophers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Russell and Wittgenstein have considered that perceptual experience demonstrates what a phenomenon is on the line between the mind and the external world. Therefore, conceptualizing the phenomenon is based on the perceptual evidence. However, if the (...)
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  9. Prolegomena in Proclus’ Theory on the Divine Henads.Christos Terezis - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (3-4):67-82.
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  10.  14
    Democratic Self-Determination Through Anarchic, Public Will-Formation.Hauke Brunkhorst - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):190-203.
    Aim is a robust theory of deliberative democracy. Therefore, three theses are explained by two historical examples, the revolution of 1848 in France, and the new social movements that emerged in the 1960s. The theses are that democratic will-formation is related internally to truth. The foundation and justification of all legal norms in public will-formation presupposes the sublation of the liberal dualism of democracy and rights and of the idealist dualism of rationality and reality in favor of a continuum of (...)
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  11.  1
    Responding to the Challenges of Globalisation.Wilhelm Dagmar - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):37-58.
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  12.  4
    Alternative Visions of a New Global Order.Cristina Lafont - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):92-114.
    In this essay, I analyze the cosmopolitan project for a new international order that Habermas has articulated in recent publications. I argue that his presentation of the project oscillates between two models. The first is a very ambitious model for a future international order geared to fulfill the peace and human rights goals of the UN Charter. The second is a minimalist model, in which the obligation to protect human rights by the international community is circumscribed to the negative duty (...)
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  13.  1
    Defining Cosmopolitanism.Anastasia Marinopoulou - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):59-79.
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  14.  10
    Popular Sovereignty, Populism and Deliberative Democracy.Kolja Möller - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):14-36.
    This article investigates the relationship between popular sovereignty, populism, and deliberative democracy. My main thesis is that populisms resurrect the polemical dimension of popular sovereignty by turning “the people” against the “powerbloc” or the “elite”, and that it is crucial thatthis terrain not be ceded to authoritarian distortions of this basic contestatory grammar. Furthermore, I contend that populist forms of politics are compatible with a procedural and deliberative conception of democracy. Ifirst engage with the assumption that populism and a procedural (...)
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  15.  2
    Are There Limits to Postmetap Hysical Thought?Stefan Müller-Doohm - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):145-167.
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  16.  10
    A Cosmopolitan Legitimization of State Borders.Julian Nida-Rümelin - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):80-91.
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  17.  3
    Habermas and Enlightenment.William Outhwaite - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):1-13.
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  18.  3
    System and Life-World, or Systems and Systemic Environments?Darrow Schecter - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):115-144.
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  19.  3
    The Problem of Limit Concepts in Habermas.Piet Strydom - 2018 - Philosophical Inquiry 42 (1-2):168-189.
    This essay deals with Habermas’ concept of truth in his late theoretical philosophy. Assuming his suggestive yet highly inspiring inauguration of a cognitive turn in Critical Theory, it probes his use of the notion of limit concept against the background of the tradition of thought from which it originally derives with the intention of identifying the notion’s potential for taking this promising departure further. It brings to the fore a number of issues in his late writings that reveal the presence (...)
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