Year:

  1.  2
    A Problem for Deontic Doxastic Constitutivism.Davide Fassio - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):343-364.
    Deontic Doxastic Constitutivism is the view that beliefs are constitutively governed by deontic norms. This roughly means that a full account and understanding of the nature of these mental attitudes cannot be reached unless one appeals to some norm of this type. My aim in this article is to provide an objection to such a conception of the normativity of belief. I argue that if some deontic norm is constitutive of belief, then the addressees of such a norm are committed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  4
    The Ethics of Reflexivity: Pride, Self-Sufficiency, and Modesty.Jeremy Fischer - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):365-399.
    This essay develops a framework for understanding what I call the ethics of reflexivity, that is, the norms that govern attitudes and actions with respect to one’s own worth. I distinguish five central aspects of the reflexive commitment to living in accordance with one’s personal ideals: the extent to which and manner in which one regards oneself from an evaluative point of view, the extent to which one cares about receiving the respect of others, the degree to which one interprets (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Absences as Latent Potentialities.David Hommen - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):401-435.
    Absences, i.e., agential omissions and forbearances, but also ‘natural’ negative states and events beyond the sphere of human agency, seem to be part and parcel of the real world. Yet, it is exactly the putative reality of absences that strikes many philosophers as utterly mysterious, if not entirely unintelligible. As a promising approach towards solving the problem of real absences, I wish to explore the idea that absences are latent potentialities. To this end, I shall investigate what potentialities are, what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Communal Basis for Moral Dignity: An African Perspective.Polycarp A. Ikuenobe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):437-469.
    I examine the standard view of dignity in Western literature and Metz’s African community view of dignity as a capacity for communal harmonious living. I argue that moral dignity is not just having a capacity for harmonious communal living, but the moral use of such capacity for the promotion of love, friendship, positive identity and active solidarity, which involves normatively prescriptive and evaluative elements. Thus, a plausible African communal conception of moral dignity, which is founded on a moral conception of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  5
    Time Without Rate.Takeshi Sakon - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):471-496.
    There is a lingering objection to the idea of the passage of time. Roughly speaking, the argument runs as follows: if time passes, its passage must occur at some rate, but there is no such rate; hence, the passage of time is a myth. While some philosophers try to reject premise, I wish to challenge the first premise by arguing that time may pass with or without a rate. My argument addresses two cases, one that identifies the passage of time (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  10
    Coincidence: The Grounding Problem, Object-Specifying Principles, and Some Consequences.Alan Sidelle - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (3):497-528.
    This paper lays out the basic structure of any view involving coincident entities, in the light of the grounding problem. While the account is not novel, I highlight fundamental features, to which attention is not usually properly drawn. With this in place, I argue for a number of further claims: The basic differences between coincident objects are modal differences, and any other differences between them need to be explained in terms of these differences. More specifically, the basic difference is not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  51
    Kant’s Racism.Lucy Allais - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):1-36.
    After a long period of comparative neglect, in the last few decades growing numbers of philosophers have been paying attention to the startling contrast presented between Kant’s universal moral theory, with its inspiring enlightenment ideas of human autonomy, equality and dignity and Kant’s racism. Against Charles Mills, who argues that the way to make Kant consistent is by attributing to him a threshold notion of moral personhood, according to which some races do not qualify for consideration under the categorical imperative, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  9
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice.Mary Carman - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):335-341.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  20
    Amicably Deceived.Anthony Carreras - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):133-158.
    A widely accepted thesis in the philosophy of friendship is what I call "the self-knowledge thesis," which says that good friendship is essentially such as to conduce to self-knowledge. I argue in this paper that the self-knowledge thesis is false. Good friendship need not conduce to self-knowledge, for it is part of the nature and value of friendship that it might lead us to form false beliefs about ourselves.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  4
    Token Causal Powers.Jeff Engelhardt - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):159-180.
    This paper proposes that the relation between property instances and token causal powers is akin to the relation between primary substances and property instances on the Aristotelian account of property instantiation. This view permits an individual to have two tokens of the same type of causal power. Paul Audi has argued that this cannot be: two tokens of the same power type are discernible, he claims, only if they are borne by discernible individuals. In the context of this criticism, he (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  7
    Good Advice.Patrick Fleming - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):181-207.
    Advice is interesting because it is a relationship that is built upon two asymmetries. Advice concerns what the advisee ought to do. For that reason, considerations of autonomy suggest that the advisee has a greater claim on what matters in deliberation. However, the advisor is wiser than the advisee. That suggests that the advisor has a greater insight into what matters in deliberation. These are the asymmetry of autonomy and the asymmetry of wisdom. To account for both, I argue for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  5
    Encomium of the Ordinary: Remarks on Hosseini’s Wittgenstein.Dylan B. Futter - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):317-333.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  6
    Philosophy as Paradigms: An Account of a Contextual Metaphilosophical Perspective.Dimitris Gakis - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):209-239.
    The present paper aims at highlighting some of the main characteristics of a descriptive contextual approach to philosophy. Descriptive, in the sense that it centers not on the question of what philosophy should be, but on what philosophy is, has been, or may be. And contextual, in the sense that it treats philosophy as human praxis situated in and interacting with certain social and historical settings. In order to develop such an account, we engage closely with Kuhn’s paradigm-centered contextual approach (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    Racial Inequality.George Hull - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):37-74.
    In societies with a history of racial oppression, present-day relations between members of different racialised groups are often difficult, tense, prone to escalate into open hostility. This can partly be put down to the persistence of racist beliefs and sentiments. But it is plausible to think there are also non-racist ways in which societal relations between members of different racialised groups go seriously wrong. This is not to downplay the extent to which racism persists: rather, the point is that there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  2
    How Collusion Perpetuates Racial Discrimination in Societies That Ostensibly Promote Equal Opportunity.Helen Lauer - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):75-101.
    It is shown here that injustices due to racial discrimination are best identified in light of the deleterious effects they have upon their victims, rather than the beliefs and attitudes of their perpetrators. For among participants who cooperate clandestinely to bring about racial injustice there may be broad disagreement about what it is they are doing collectively, and why; or they may disagree in principle about whether what they are doing is morally right. I employ the notion of ‘nomotropic’ behaviour (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  3
    Understanding Real and Fictional Persons: Narrative Negotiations Seen Through Cognitive Poetics.Alfonso Muñoz-Corcuera - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):241-265.
    Narrative theories of personal identity have traditionally taken literary characters as models to better understand how our identities are constituted through the narratives of our lives. However, there have been several recent criticisms of these comparisons, showing that philosophers of personal identity paid no attention to the nature of literary characters, and consequently, these philosopher’s comparisons were under-motivated. In the present article, I rely on a cognitive framework to define literary characters. From that point of view, I assert that it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  15
    Psychological Deprogramming–Reprogramming and the Right Kind of Cause.Andrew Naylor - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):267-288.
    This paper makes use of an example of Williams’s, an example involving so-called psychological deprogramming–reprogramming, in arguing that procedures such as Teletransportation would not provide what matters to us in our self-interested concern for the future. This is so because the beliefs and other psychological states of a resultant person would not be appropriately causally dependent on any beliefs or other psychological states of the original person.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Essentialising Rhetoric and Work on the Self.Samantha Vice - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):103-131.
    This paper is a response to recent student protests at South African universities, and the essentialising rhetoric and practices that characterise South African public debates. I explore the likely responses of white South Africans to views that seem to make their whiteness inescapable and necessarily morally bad.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  95
    Epicurean Wills, Empty Hopes, and the Problem of Post Mortem Concern.Bill Wringe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):289-315.
    Many Epicurean arguments for the claim that death is nothing to us depend on the ‘Experience Constraint’: the claim that something can only be good or bad for us if we experience it. However, Epicurus’ commitment to the Experience Constraint makes his attitude to will-writing puzzling. How can someone who accepts the Experience Constraint be motivated to bring about post mortem outcomes?We might think that an Epicurean will-writer could be pleased by the thought of his/her loved ones being provided for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues