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  1.  6
    Blame Mitigation: A Less Tidy Take and its Philosophical Implications.Jennifer L. Daigle & Joanna Demaree-Cotton - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):490-521.
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  2.  4
    Who Knows What Mary Knew? An Experimental Study.Daniel Gregory, Malte Hendrickx & Cameron Turner - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):522-545.
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  3.  6
    Review of Neurocognitive Mechanisms: Explaining Biological Cognition. [REVIEW]Jonny Lee - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):617-620.
  4. The “Puzzle” of Emotional Plasticity.Raamy Majeed - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):546-568.
    The “puzzle” of emotional plasticity concerns making sense of two conflicting bodies of evidence: evidence that emotions often appear modular in key respects, and evidence that our emotions also often appear to transcend this modularity. In this paper, I argue a developmentalist approach to emotion, which builds on Karmiloff-Smith’s (1986, 1992, 1994, 2015) work on cognitive development, can help us dissolve this puzzle.
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  5.  8
    On the Development of Geometric Cognition: Beyond Nature Vs. Nurture.Markus Pantsar - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):595-616.
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  6. Delusional Mood and Affection.Jae Ryeong Sul - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (4):467-489.
    Delusional mood is a well-recognized psychological state, often present in the prodromal stage of schizophrenia. Various phenomenological psychopathologists have proposed that delusional mood may not only precede but also contribute to the later formation of schizophrenic delusion. Hence, understanding experiential abnormalities involved with the delusional mood have been considered central for the understanding of schizophrenic delusion. Ranging from traditional and contemporary phenomenological and neurobiological accounts, it has been often mentioned that the peculiar affective saliency of the world experience may underpin (...)
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  7.  4
    The Mnemonic Functions of Episodic Memory.Alexandria Boyle - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):327-349.
    Episodic memory is the form of memory involved in remembering personally experienced past events. Here, I address two questions about episodic memory’s function: what does episodic memory do for us, and why do we have it? Recent work addressing these questions has emphasized episodic memory’s role in imaginative simulation, criticizing the mnemonic view on which episodic memory is “for” remembering. In this paper, I offer a defense of the mnemonic view by highlighting an underexplored mnemonic function of episodic memory – (...)
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  8.  6
    Moral Failure and the Evolution of Appearing Moral.Scott M. James - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):386-409.
  9.  4
    Methodological Worries on Recent Experimental Philosophy of Music.Nemesio García-Carril Puy - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):410-441.
  10.  58
    Is There a Tactile Field?Błażej Skrzypulec - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):301-326.
    It seems that there are important differences concerning the way in which space itself is presented in visual and tactile modalities. In the case of vision, it is usually accepted that visual objects are experienced as located in a visual field. However, it is controversial whether similar field-like characteristics can be attributed to the space in which tactile entities are experienced to be located. The paper investigates whether postulating the presence of a tactile field is justified. I argue that the (...)
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  11. A Causal View of the Sense of Agency.Antonella Tramacere - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):442-465.
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  12.  91
    Should Morality Be Abolished? An Empirical Challenge to the Argument From Intolerance.Jennifer Cole Wright & Thomas Pölzler - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (3):350-385.
    Moral abolitionists claim that morality ought to be abolished. According to one of their most prominent arguments, this is because making moral judgments renders people significantly less tolerant toward anyone who holds divergent views. In this paper we investigate the hypothesis that morality’s tolerance-decreasing effect only occurs if people are realists about moral issues, i.e., they interpret these issues as objectively grounded. We found support for this hypothesis (Studies 1 and 2). Yet, it also turned out that the intolerance associated (...)
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  13.  54
    Sullying Sights.Ryan P. Doran - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):177-204.
    In this article, an account of the architecture of the cognitive contamination system is offered, according to which the contamination system can generate contamination represen- tations in circumstances that do not satisfy the norms of contamination, including in cases of mere visual contact with disgusting objects. It is argued that this architecture is important for explaining the content, logic, distribution, and persistence of maternal impression beliefs – according to which fetal defects are caused by the pregnant mother’s experiences and actions (...)
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  14. Capacity for Simulation and Mitigation Drives Hedonic and Non-Hedonic Time Biases.Preston Greene, Andrew J. Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):226-252.
    Until recently, philosophers debating the rationality of time-biases have supposed that people exhibit a first-person hedonic bias toward the future, but that their non-hedonic and third-person preferences are time-neutral. Recent empirical work, however, suggests that our preferences are more nuanced. First, there is evidence that our third-person preferences exhibit time-neutrality only when the individual with respect to whom we have preferences—the preference target—is a random stranger about whom we know nothing; given access to some information about the preference target, third-person (...)
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  15.  2
    Continence, Temperance, and Motivational Conflict: Why Traditional Neo-Aristotelian Accounts Are Psychologically Unrealistic.Matthew C. Haug - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):205-225.
    Traditional neo-Aristotelian accounts hold that temperance and continence are distinct character traits that are distinguished by the extent to which their bearers experience motivational conflict. In this paper, I formulate two pairs of necessary conditions—which, collectively, I call the conformity thesis—that articulate this distinction. Then, drawing on work in contemporary social and personality psychology, I argue that the conformity thesis is false. Being highly self-controlled is the best, psychologically realistic candidate for continence. However, our best evidence suggests that highly self-controlled/continent (...)
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  16. Culture, Genes, Selection, and Learning: A Response to Nichols, Mackey & Moll.Anton Killin & Ross Pain - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):297-300.
  17.  1
    The Many Faces of Hedonic Adaptation.Søren Harnow Klausen, Jakob Emiliussen, Regina Christiansen, Lejla Hasandedic-Dapo & Søren Engelsen - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):253-278.
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  18.  5
    Relationship-Based Moral Judgments: A Qualitative Study.Mehdizadeh Mahsa, Khosravi Zohreh, Bagheri NoaParst Khosrow & Abolfazl Sabramiz - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):1-24.
    The goal of the present study was to explain the pattern of familiar and unfamiliar relationships influencing moral judgments. In this qualitative study, relationship-based moral judgments were examined according to the constructivist theory. The studied sample included 27 individuals, including 14 women and 13 men (both young and old), living in Tehran. A purposeful sampling method was used. In order to collect data, participants were faced with moral dilemmas using semi-structured interviews. The results showed that emotional intimacy, lack of tolerance (...)
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  19.  2
    How to Create a Cultural Species: Evaluating Three Proposals.Ryan Nichols, Henrike Moll & Jacob L. Mackey - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):279-296.
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  20. Exploring the Structure of Mental Action in Directed Thought.Johannes Wagemann - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (2):145-176.
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  21.  10
    A New Philosophical Psychology.Lisa Bortolotti - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):1-5.
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  22.  1
    Weighing the Moral Worth of Altruistic Actions: A Discrepancy Between Moral Evaluations and Prescriptive Judgments.Inna F. Deviatko & Andrey Bykov - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):95-121.
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  23. Emotions and the Body. Testing the Subtraction Argument.Rodrigo Díaz - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):47-65.
    Can we experience emotion without the feeling of accelerated heartbeats, perspiration, or other changes in the body? In his paper “What is an emotion”, William James famously claimed that “if we fancy some strong emotion and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings of its bodily symptoms, we find we have nothing left behind” (1884, p. 193). Thus, bodily changes are essential to emotion. This is known as the Subtraction Argument. The Subtraction Argument is still (...)
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  24.  14
    Considering the Boundaries of Intellectual Disability: Using Philosophy of Science to Make Sense of Borderline Cases.Veerle Garrels - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):6-21.
    Who should be diagnosed with intellectual disability and who should not? For borderline cases, the answer to this question may be as difficult to decide on as determining the borderline between being bald or not. While going bald may be upsetting to some, it is also an inevitable and relatively undramatic course of nature. In contrast, getting a diagnosis of intellectual disability is likely to have more far-reaching consequences. This makes the question of where the cutoff point for intellectual disability (...)
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  25. Shame, Selves, and Morality.Charlie Kurth - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):122-140.
    This essay critically examines the account of shame and its moral value that Krista Thomason develops in her book, Naked.
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  26. Teleosemantics and the Hard Problem of Content.Stephen Francis Mann & Ross Pain - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):22-46.
    Hutto and Myin claim that teleosemantics cannot account for mental content. In their view, teleosemantics accounts for a poorer kind of relation between cognitive states and the world but lacks the theoretical tools to account for a richer kind. We show that their objection imposes two criteria on theories of content: a truth-evaluable criterion and an intensionality criterion. For the objection to go through, teleosemantics must be subject to both these criteria and must fail to satisfy them. We argue that (...)
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  27.  33
    What’s Up with Anti-Natalists? An Observational Study on the Relationship Between Dark Triad Personality Traits and Anti-Natalist Views.Philipp Schönegger - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):66-94.
  28.  2
    Response to Kurth and Nelson.Krista K. Thomason - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 35 (1):141-144.
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  29. Can We Read Minds by Imaging Brains?Charles Rathkopf - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 10:1-25.
    Will brain imaging technology soon enable neuroscientists to read minds? We cannot answer this question without some understanding of the state of the art in neuroimaging. But neither can we answer this question without some understanding of the concept invoked by the term "mind reading." This article is an attempt to develop such understanding. Our analysis proceeds in two stages. In the first stage, we provide a categorical explication of mind reading. The categorical explication articulates empirical conditions that must be (...)
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  30.  5
    An Offloading View of Perceptual Learning. [REVIEW]Tomy Ames - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1:1-6.
  31.  62
    The Challenges Raised by Comorbidity in Psychiatric Research: The Case of Autism.Valentina Petrolini & Agustín Vicente - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1:1-28.
    Despite several criticisms surrounding the DSM classification in psychiatry, a significant bulk of research on mental conditions still operates according to two core assumptions: a) homogeneity, that is the idea that mental conditions are sufficiently homogeneous to justify generalization; b) additive comorbidity, that is the idea that the coexistence of multiple conditions in the same individual can be interpreted as additive. In this paper we take autism research as a case study to show that, despite a plethora of criticism, psychiatric (...)
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  32.  85
    The Disunity of Moral Judgment: Evidence and Implications.David Sackris & Rasmus Rosenberg Larsen - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1:1-20.
    We argue that there is significant evidence for reconsidering the possibility that moral judgment constitutes a distinctive category of judgment. We begin by reviewing evidence and arguments from neuroscience and philosophy that seem to indicate that a diversity of brain processes result in verdicts that we ordinarily consider “moral judgments”. We argue that if these findings are correct, this is plausible reason for doubting that all moral judgments necessarily share common features: if diverse brain processes give rise to what we (...)
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  33.  12
    Against Reductivist Character Realism.Anne Jeffrey & Alina Beary - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology:1-28.
    It seems like people have character traits that explain a good deal of their behavior. Call a theory character realism just in case it vindicates this folk assumption. Recently, Christian Miller has argued that the way to reconcile character realism with decades of psychological research is to adopt metaphysical reductivism about character traits. Some contemporary psychological theories of character and virtue seem to implicitly endorse such reductivism; others resist reduction of traits to finer-grained mental components or processes; and still others (...)
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  34.  27
    Qualitative Methods Show That Surveys Misrepresent “Ought Implies Can” Judgments.Kyle Thompson - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology:1-29.
    Experimental philosophers rely almost exclusively on quantitative surveys that potentially misrepresent participants’ multifarious judgments. To assess the efficacy of qualitative methods in experimental philosophy and reveal limitations with quantitative surveys, a study was conducted on the Kantian principle that ‘ought implies can’, which limits moral obligation to actions that agents can do. Specifically, the think aloud method and a follow-up interview were employed in a modified version of a prominent experiment that recorded participants’ judgments of ability, blame, and obligation using (...)
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  35.  9
    Ontological and Conceptual Challenges in the Study of Aesthetic Experience.Ioannis Xenakis & Argyris Arnellos - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology:1-43.
    We explain that most of the explanations that traditionally have been used to conceptually and ontologically differentiate aesthetic experience from any other are not compatible with a naturalistic framework, since they are based on transcendental idealistic metaphysics, reductions, and on the assumption that the aesthetic is an a priori special ontology in the object and the mind. However, contemporary works that propose as an alternative to apply directly evidence and theory from the science of emotions to the problem of aesthetics (...)
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