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  1.  3
    Refusing Disenchantment: Romanticism, Criticism, Philosophy.Stanley Bates - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):549-557.
    Aremarkable revival of interest in Romanticism has taken place among some philosophers in recent years. Why should this be so? Romanticism has had a bad reputation among literary critics of a variety of persuasions throughout most of the twentieth century, when it was not even a topic for analytical philosophy in the English-speaking world. The philosophical movement most associated with Romanticism—German idealism—had been shunned by the curricula of a majority of the most prestigious British and American universities by the mid-twentieth (...)
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  2.  1
    The Postmodern Split: Poetry, Theory, and the Metaphysics That Would Not Die.Bruce Bond - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):558-568.
    Postmodernism, in spite of its exaggerations and myopias, has left us with many gifts, including two strains of the critical tradition that struggle to reconcile with each other. Those strains grow from two undeniable truths: that the self can never occupy the space of the other, nor can the self extricate the other from its nature. Given the conflict between these truths, the postmodern resistance to metaphysics can never be quite as rigorous as it imagines, since the self, as inextricable (...)
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  3. Irony as a Way of Life: Svevo, Kierkegaard, and Psychoanalysis.Emma Bond - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):431-445.
    “To create fiction is, in fact, a way to abolish reality.”1The main title of this article departs from a statement made by Andrew Cross in the chapter he wrote for The Cambridge Companion to Kierkegaard, “Neither Either nor Or: the Perils of Reflexive Irony,” which must surely suggest a tantalizing read for anyone familiar with the writings of Italo Svevo. In his chapter, Cross posits Søren Kierkegaard’s theorizing of irony as “not just a verbal strategy, but a way of life.”2 (...)
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  4.  3
    A Critical Review of Derek Matravers's Fiction and Narrative.Carroll Noël - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):569-578.
    Derek Matravers’s latest book—Fiction and Narrative1—is a bracing review of many of the leading topics in the philosophical discussion of the intersection of—as his title indicates—fiction and narrative. A major aim of the book is to dethrone the prevailing view that the notion of the imagination plays a central role in the definition of fiction versus nonfiction. In addition, Matravers argues that the distinction we should care about in this vicinity is between representation and confrontation. Matravers takes up many other (...)
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  5.  1
    Trusting the Author: On Narrative Tension and the Puzzle of Audience Anxiety.W. Scott Clifton - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):325-346.
    In the opening episode of season four of the AMC network’s television show Breaking Bad, the attentive viewer reaches a point at which it’s difficult to see how the show’s heroes, Walter White and Jesse Pinkman, will escape death. The two are chemists and manufacturers of crystal methamphetamine for drug kingpin Gus Fring. At the end of the previous season they had picked up on Fring’s plans to kill them and replace them with another chemist, Gale Boetticher, who by then (...)
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  6. Six Scenes of Instruction in Stanley Cavell's Little Did I Know.Peter Dula - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):465-479.
    Stanley Cavell ends his autobiography with a long stretch of dialogue at his elderly, ailing father’s hospital bedside. His father, we know from the memoir’s earliest and most powerful pages, could be a brutish man, prone to unaccountable rages, permanently scarring the child Cavell. Because of the central role the father plays in beginning the story, Cavell’s decision to return to his father at the end demands close attention. The reader arriving at the final pages, still haunted by the way (...)
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  7.  1
    Narrative, Identity, and the Disunity of Life.Feuerhahn Niels - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):526-548.
    The notion that narratives play an important cognitive role in our ability to make sense of the world has become an intellectual commonplace. Peter Lamarque notes that “narratives are prominent in human lives, not only in the obvious places like literature, history and biography, but in virtually all forms of reflective cognition.”1 The argument that I present in this paper draws on a particular understanding of the significance of narrative for the constitution of selfhood. This understanding was first articulated by (...)
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  8. Joining the Past to the Future: The Autobiographical Self in The Things They Carried.Ann M. Genzale - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):495-510.
    Developments in neuroscience over the last few decades have shown an increasing interest in examining art and culture as a means of acquiring a greater understanding of the human brain. By the same token, our knowledge of the brain can be tremendously helpful in the study of cultural output, not only in terms of how culture works in a biological sense but why it remains so indispensable and integral to the well-being of individuals and societies. In Self Comes to Mind, (...)
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  9.  2
    Oedipus the Tyrant: A View of Catharsis in Eight Sentences.Glassberg Roy - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):579-580.
    The following is an attempt at something new, an experiment in micro-criticism that proposes to solve the conundrum of Aristotelian catharsis in fewer than two hundred words. Reference is made to Oedipus Tyrannus.According to Aristotle, the catharsis of pity and fear is a primary goal of tragedy.1Pity is a response to “unmerited misfortune”.Fear depends upon pity—with the spectator fearing that he, too, may be subject to unmerited misfortune.Unmerited misfortune is an abomination, a condition suggestive of a defective moral order.Aristotle regards (...)
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  10. Only Connect: Moral Judgment, Embodiment, and Hypocrisy in Howards End.Mark Hopwood - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):399-414.
    It is here that the precise point of Forster’s manner appears.... The plot suggests eternal division, the manner reconciliation; the plot speaks of clear certainties, the manner resolutely insists that nothing can be quite so simple. “Wash ye, make yourselves clean,” says the plot, and the manner murmurs, “If you can find the soap.”If a great work of literature is one that admits of many interpretations, then E. M. Forster’s Howards End has—at the very least—a great epigraph. “Only connect...”—only connect (...)
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  11. Two-Part Invention: Voices From Augustine's The Teacher and Samuel Beckett's Endgame.Kidd Erika - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):480-494.
    We see our fathers naked, we men.Among the more poignant moments of Stanley Cavell’s 2010 autobiography Little Did I Know are those in which young Cavell works to find words to break the silence that hung between himself and his father. In one exchange, seven-year-old Cavell’s aimless remark about speckled chocolate wafers was met with a savage retort and marked the moment when Cavell became certain his father wanted him dead—or rather, not to exist at all. Cavell was tormented both (...)
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  12. Kantian Anti-Theodicy and Job's Sincerity.Sari Kivistö & Sami Pihlström - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):347-365.
    This essay is based on a double perspective provided by literary reading and philosophy for approaching the problem of evil through a critical analysis of certain texts and characters constructed and represented in them, particularly Kant’s theodicy essay and its most important pre-text, the Book of Job. This methodology yields a novel approach to the familiar issue of theodicy vs. anti-theodicy. Our methodology differs from the more standard ways of examining philosophical ideas expressed in literature. In the case discussed here, (...)
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  13. Lateness and the Inhospitable in Stanley Cavell and Don DeLillo.Áine Mahon & Fergal McHugh - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):446-464.
    Theodor Adorno’s “Late Style in Beethoven” is the first philosophically sophisticated attempt to chronicle, if not fully characterize, movements of the mature artwork. With direct reference to Beethoven’s third and final phase, Adorno offers a complex formulation of aging and artistry. He attempts to capture, ambitiously, the content and internal structure of the late artwork, the forms to which that internal structure is responsible, the artistic conventions governing that structure, the sociohistorical conditions in which the work was produced and, finally, (...)
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  14. "I Know Who I Am": Don Quixote, Self-Fashioning, and the Humanness of Ordinary Identity.Martinez Felicia - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):511-525.
    What does it mean to know who you are? Is it a matter of knowing your name? The things that you’ve done? The people you love? Such indispensible knowledge is somehow not enough; I can know all of these things, and still feel puzzled about who I am. “I am not the person I once was,” “I am not myself today,” and “I am learning who I am,” are all commonplace poems of a kind: expressive sentences completely at home both (...)
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  15. Sade's Ethics of Emotional Restraint: Aline Et Valcour Midway Between Sentimentality and Apathy.Marco Menin - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):366-382.
    The Marquis de Sade’s work can be considered as one of the inaugural instances of a technique that, within both the philosophical and literary realm, is typical of the nineteenth century: emotional restraint. His disapproval of the rhetoric of empathy and moral sentimentalism assumes particular relevance in that it is an “internal” critique. Availing himself of certain characteristic premises of the sentimentalist philosophy—which are primarily attributable to the works of Jean-Jacques Rousseau—Sade completely changes their conclusions, to the point of reaching (...)
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  16.  5
    Foucault and Kripke on the Proper Names of Authors.Christopher Mole - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):383-398.
    The semantic issues that Saul Kripke addressed in Naming and Necessity1 overlap substantially with those that were addressed by Michel Foucault in “What Is an Author?”2 The present essay examines their area of overlap, with a view to showing that each of these works affords a perspective on the other, from which facets that are usually obscure can be brought into view. It shows that Foucault needs to take some assumptions from Kripke’s theory of naming in order to secure one (...)
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  17.  1
    "Thick" Aesthetic Emotions and the Autonomy of Art.Mark Silcox - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (2):415-430.
    For the properly “cultivated,” proclaimed Oscar Wilde in 1890, “beautiful things mean only Beauty.”1 The idea that artworks possess a discrete and autonomous type of value, by virtue of their capacity to provoke a distinctively aesthetic type of response, is most often associated with artists and critics belonging to the modernist tradition of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Certainly, many influential writers of the period who expressed more instrumentalist attitudes toward the value of their own work, such as (...)
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