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  1.  4
    Of "Just Compassion": Sympathy, Justice, and the French Exiles in Charlotte Smith's The Emigrants.Shiqin Chen - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):383-396.
  2.  6
    Even Better Than the Real Thing: Dostoevsky's Absurd Realism.Aaron Closson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):463-469.
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  3.  8
    To Live a Meaningful Life: Reading Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Through Heideggerian Techne.Tara Cuthbertson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):447-462.
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  4.  11
    Wittgenstein and Dostoevsky: Happiness and Subjectivity.Piotr Dehnel - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):470-488.
  5.  4
    Montaigne's Perfect Friendship and Perfect Society: Philosophical Fictions as Useful Reminders.Christopher Edelman - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):367-382.
    Montaigne’s “Of friendship” is often read as a celebration of his relationship with his late friend, Étienne La Boétie. This is not wrong, but rather, incomplete. Drawing on the chapters of Montaigne’s Essays that immediately follow “Of friendship,” this essay argues that Montaigne’s chapter on friendship is part of a larger project in which he employs philosophical fictions—specifically, his “perfect friendship” with La Boétie and the “perfect society” that he depicts in “Of cannibals”—to reorient us in our relationships not only (...)
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  6.  12
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):295-314.
  7.  5
    "Deus in Animo": Kantian Ugliness and the Narrative Aesthetic of Frankenstein.Karen Hadley - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):435-446.
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  8.  2
    Upbringing and Agency: Three Perspectives.Stewart Justman - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):348-366.
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  9. MacNeice the Heraclitean.J. H. Lesher - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):315-328.
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  10.  8
    Making Sense of Suffering: Merleau-Ponty and Keats's "Vale of Soul-Making".David Lo - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):279-294.
  11.  2
    From the Margin a Silent Tick: On the Traces of Performative Judgment in Literary Works.Paul Magee - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):329-347.
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  12. Thoreau's "Life Without Principle" and the Art of Living and Getting a Living.David B. Raymond - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):397-415.
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  13.  2
    The Logic of Sentiment: Stowe, Hawthorne, and Melville by Kenneth Dauber.Russell Sbriglia - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):499-505.
    As a work of philosophically grounded literary criticism in the tradition of Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy, Kenneth Dauber's The Logic of Sentiment: Stowe, Hawthorne, and Melville will be an altogether welcomed book among those for whom it is more instructive to think sentimentality alongside literary authors than to merely historicize—to "archeologize" or "genealogize"—it from an all-too-safe critical distance. Though primarily a book on sentiment, its theoretical through line is to think skepticism outside of the epistemological, to think it in (...)
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  14.  5
    Frankenstein, the Frankfurt School, and the Domination of Nature.Sid Simpson - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):416-434.
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  15.  7
    On Having Three Names.Bruce B. Suttle - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):496-498.
    This morning, as I ate breakfast, I started David Foster Wallace's short story "Good People."1 I began. … Wait a minute! Damn it! Why not Wallace's, or David Wallace's short story? I've never seen nor heard his name other than as a trio; the same is so with others, such as Louisa May Alcott, William Carlos Williams, Joyce Carol Oates, Robert Louis Stevenson, Katherine Anne Porter, et al. One finds it even in operas—for example, in Giacomo Puccini's Turandot we have (...)
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  16.  5
    Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):295 - 314.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  17.  6
    In Defense of Abstract Creationism: A Recombinatorial Approach.Michael Y. Bennett - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):489-495.
    As a version of creationism—which claims that fictional charac- ters are created by authors who write characters into existence by penning their names in their works—abstract creationism claims that fictional objects are abstract entities. However, I want to modify the conception of what constitutes a fictional object. In short, I am going to give a defense of abstract creationism that offers answers to the questions, as outlined by Stuart Brock, of ontology, identity, and plenitude by developing a claim that—except for (...)
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  18.  5
    German Romantic Philosophy: "Underhand Theology"?Theodore Ziolkowski - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):269-278.
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  19.  18
    "Life" in John Williams's Stoner.Emily Abdeni-Holman - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):138-156.
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  20.  10
    Aristophanes's Hiccups and Erotic Impotence.Don Adams - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):17-33.
  21.  7
    Modernist Sense of the End and Postmodernist Illusion of the End.Rizwan Saeed Ahmed & Akhtar Aziz - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):121-137.
  22.  6
    The Dance of the Semantic Phoenix: Autopoietic Systems of Meaning in Finnegans Wake.Andrew J. Ball - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):172-184.
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  23.  23
    What is a Life?Brett Bourbon - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):211-223.
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  24.  9
    Activism Via Inaction (Wu Wei): Oscar Wilde's Interpretation and Appropriation of Chuang Tzu.Qi Chen - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):103-120.
  25.  11
    Ivan Ilych and Autobiographical Despair.Christopher Cowley - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):199-210.
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  26.  10
    What is Authorial Intention?John Farrell - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):55-70.
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  27.  7
    Cognitive Bias and Narrative Credibility in Proust.Darci L. Gardner - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):1-16.
  28.  10
    A New Theory of Tragic Catharsis.Roy Glassberg - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):249-252.
    Aristotle's Poetics has come down to us in a form that is fragmented and incomplete. For example, its famous definition of tragedy begins by stating that it is a summation of what has come before:Let us now discuss Tragedy, resuming its formal definition, as resulting from what has been already said. Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being (...)
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  29.  5
    Sara Lidman's Secular Reading of Original Sin.Nora Hämäläinen - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):88-102.
  30.  5
    Theory of Mind and Experimental Autobiography: Alain Robbe-Grillet and Assia Djebar.Michaela Hulstyn - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):185-198.
  31.  19
    Lyric Self-Fashioning: Sonnet 35 as Formal Model.Joshua Landy - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):224-248.
    Each of us is not just a set of actions, experiences, and plans but also a set of traits, capacities, and attitudes; we are as much our character as our life. And while story form can help unify a messy life, when it comes to a messy character, we may need something like the form of a poem. Could we model our self-conception, then, on a work like Sonnet 35? In finding deep-going unity—and even bittersweet beauty—beneath surface-level ambivalence, Sonnet 35 (...)
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  32.  4
    Cassiopeia's Dust.Ron Louie - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):253-254.
    [A dilettante admires a constellation from a hot tub, and considers it the next day. Is it a prose poem, creative nonfiction, or "light" verse; phenomenology, astrophysics, metaphysics, or half-lit paronomasia?]A photon hit my retina. Again, again; others also hit. The sensation seemed continuous, albeit twinkling, rather than as discrete and separated points. It was like dust, but I didn't blink.It came from a thing I would call bright, in front of me, over my head, on a dark night; it (...)
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  33.  7
    From Joyce to McKeon: The University, the Humanities, and the Becoming Teacher.Áine Mahon - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):255-267.
    In his seminal work, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life, Parker J. Palmer brings to critical attention not teaching methodologies or teaching techniques but the very identity and integrity of the person who teaches. In an extended meditation on the life of the teacher at all educational levels, Palmer chooses to foreground the significance of personhood, of self-knowledge and self-expression. The questions most commonly asked in teaching, he expands, relate to the "what," the "how," (...)
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  34.  13
    "A. I. Richards": Can Artificial Intelligence Appreciate Poetry?Jon Phelan - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):71-87.
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  35.  69
    "The Colour Out of Space": Lovecraft on Induction.Kieran Setiya - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):39-54.
    Argues for a reading of H. P. Lovecraft’s 1927 short story, "The Colour out of Space," as an affective response to the problem of induction. Lovecraft weighs the meaning of our epistemic frailty, drawing on George Santayana’s "Scepticism and Animal Faith." His writing elicits inductive vertigo, the fear that our concepts fail to carve nature at the joints.
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  36.  6
    Where is Finch's Landing? Rereading To Kill A Mockingbird As Moral Pedagogy.Simon Stow - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):157-171.
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  37.  4
    Intrinsic-Extrinsic Properties in Theater.Michael Y. Bennett - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):34-38.
    David Friedell has recently discussed the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic properties of art, specifically in music. Friedell claims that normative social rules dictate who can change the intrinsic or extrinsic properties of a piece of music. I claim that in text-based theater—as a particular art form—the dividing line between intrinsic and extrinsic properties of a play is sometimes tenuous. This tenuousness is due to a play's bifurcated existence as a dramatic text and as many theatrical performances.
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