Year:

  1.  3
    From General History to Philosophy: Black Lives Matter, Late Neoliberal Molecular Biopolitics, and Rhetoric.A. Biesecker Barbara - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):409-430.
    On the fiftieth anniversary of Philosophy and Rhetoric I hope a future for the journal that not only continues to publish scholarship that reflects seriously on the productive possibilities of putting the unique understandings of the human condition delivered by philosophy into contact with the singular insights into the power and perils of speech, writing, and gesture offered up by rhetoric. I also wish for it printed pages on which scholars engage thoughtfully the challenges posed by worlds and loss of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Rhetoricity at the End of the World.Diane Davis - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):431-451.
    Henceforth "to transform" should mean "to change the sense of sense."The field of the entity … is structured according to the diverse—genetic and structural—possibilities of the trace.The first article in the first issue of Philosophy and Rhetoric is "The Rhetorical Situation," Lloyd Bitzer's critical exegesis on "the nature of those contexts in which speakers or writers create rhetorical discourse". Bitzer contends that the rhetor produces "the rhetorical text" when a "real" or "natural" —"objective and publicly observable" —situation "calls the discourse (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Zōon Logon Ekhon: Possessing an Echo of Barbarism.Erik Doxtader - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):452-472.
    An isolated sentence—aphoristic, not fragmentary—tends to reverberate like an oracular utterance having the self-sufficiency of a communication to which nothing need be added.That is barbarian language you hear.There is no document of culture which not at the same time a document of barbarism.Zōon logon ekhon echoes. It rings, three unpunctuated words filling the air and resounding across the landscape. It reverberates, a fragment heard over and over, almost to the point where it seems to go without saying—almost. It reflects, an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  4
    The Post-Truth About Philosophy and Rhetoric.Steve Fuller - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):473-482.
    This reflection on the fiftieth anniversary of Philosophy and Rhetoric begins by recalling a debate on its pages about the origins of rhetoric, which queried the relationship between Plato and the Sophists. I argue that contrary to the shared assumption of the debate, the two sides differed less over what counts as good philosophical/rhetorical practice than over whether its access should be free or restricted. An implication of this proposed shift in interpretation is that Plato and the Sophists are both (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  2
    Money, Relativism, and the Post-Truth Political Imaginary.Elizabeth S. Goodstein - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):483-508.
    Astonishment that the things we are experiencing are "still" possible in the twentieth century is not philosophical. It is not the beginning of any insight, unless it is that the idea of history from which it comes is untenable.And so tyranny naturally arises out of democracy, and the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme form of liberty?In 1940 the exiled German critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin warned that fidelity to a vision of history as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Heidegger's 1924 Lecture Course on Aristotle's Rhetoric: Key Research Implications.Daniel M. Gross - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):509-527.
    At the outset it is worth remembering how Heidegger in the 1970s first appeared prominently, though very differently, at the intersection of rhetoric and philosophy. The "rhetoric of figures and tropes" then seemed compelling due in part to Derrida's Heidegger, who played a key role in the famous Derrida essay translated into English with the added subtitle "White Mythology: Metaphor in the Text of Philosophy." Compelling for many was the history there referenced from Cicero, book 3 of Aristotle's Rhetoric, book (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Introduction: Philosophy and Rhetoric - Rethinking Their Intersections.Gerard A. Hauser - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):371-389.
    I begin with an anecdote. While a senior at a small liberal arts college, I participated in a year-long senior seminar on evolution. The central questions were how we come to be human and, more basically, what it means to be human. Units were taught from the perspectives of biology, various traditions of philosophy, theology, education, history, and world literature. Faculty were drawn from across the curriculum, each taking units and assigning readings from their discipline that addressed our central questions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. On Rhetoric and the School of Philosophy Without Tears.Stuart J. Murray - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):528-551.
    In the introduction to his recent book outlining a "deep rhetoric" that can affirm rhetoric's "philosophical foundations," James Crosswhite celebrates a remark made by the late Henry Johnstone, the founding and long-time editor of Philosophy and Rhetoric. Johnstone, claims Crosswhite, "once suggested that rhetoric was an attempt to be 'philosophy without tears'". The passage to which Crosswhite refers appears in Johnstone's foreword to the book Rhetoric and Philosophy, a collection of essays edited by Richard Cherwitz. There, in a bungled bid (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Ways of Prediction, Ways of Rhetoric.Philippe-Joseph Salazar - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):390-408.
    Ways of prediction, ways of rhetoric? Let me begin by placing side-by-side two statements that, at face value, have nothing in common. The first comes from a report by a world leader in forecasting, Stratfor: Forecasting world events is a difficult task that takes guts and discipline. Though you can find endless scenarios and speculation almost anywhere, Stratfor gives you forecasts. These are a few of the unlikely predictions we made long before the headlines caught up: 1995—Disparity between net creditor (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. The Greeks, Pragmatism, and the Endless Mediation of Rhetoric and Philosophy.Edward Schiappa - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):552-565.
    Once upon a time, there were no academic disciplines. There were no definitions, either, at least as we understand them. Plato and Aristotle changed both of those situations in ways that continue to influence Western thought. If Plato's and Xenophon's accounts are to be trusted, Socrates and Prodicus also deserve credit for early efforts to define words, thereby helping to formulate the classic Socratic/Platonic question "What is X?" And here we are, twenty-four hundred years later, still occasionally wrestling with how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  1
    Replicating Reasons: Arguments, Memes, and the Cognitive Environment.Christopher W. Tindale - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):566-588.
    The human being is an imitative animal. This statement, or description, resonates across time and cultures. Its familiarity derives from its repetition. It has, in terms appropriate to this discussion, a memetic quality. What Aristotle says is that "imitation is natural to man from childhood, one of his advantages over the lower animals being this, that he is the most imitative creature in the world, and learns first by imitation". The proof for this, Aristotle goes on to explain, lies in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Feminist Critique and the Realistic Spirit.Linda M. G. Zerilli - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (4):589-611.
    Anyone who goes beyond procedural questions of a discourse theory of morality and ethics and, in a normative attitude … embarks on a theory of the well-ordered, or even emancipated, society will very quickly run up against the limits of his own historical situation.For some time now, a certain strand of contemporary critical theory has understood its task not as providing a substantive critique of power relations, let alone an alternative normative conception of what social relations might be, but as (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  2
    Agitation with—and of—Burke's Comic Theory.Sarah Elizabeth Adams - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):315-335.
    “Ambivalence” is the key word in much of this book; “comic” [is the book’s] most obscure and I think absolutely without use value. I don’t know what B[urke] means by “comic,” as a matter of fact. I wonder if he does, and could define it briefly. Readers of Kenneth Burke are well aware of the importance of comedy and its associated cluster of concepts in his work: comic, comic frame, comic attitude, comic corrective. This cluster of terms figures prominently in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    Quality, Rhetoric, and Choric Regression: Revisiting Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.Frentz Thomas - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):292-314.
    Quality! Virtue! Dharma! That is what the Sophists were teaching! Not ethical relativism. Not pristine “virtue.” But aretê. Excellence. Dharma! Before the Church of Reason. Before substance. Before form. Before mind and matter. Before dialectic itself. Quality had been absolute. Those first teachers of the Western world were teaching Quality, and the medium they had chosen was that of rhetoric. It’s been slightly less than a half century since Robert M. Pirsig’s Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance exploded on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  2
    Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly by Judith Butler.M. Pierce Lee - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):356-362.
    In 2011, when Judith Butler delivered the lecture series that would become Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, the speech act theorist joined other critical scholars attempting to work through the dark cloud of neoliberal fatigue settling over the humanities. “Identitarian ontologies” had become only more entrenched in the age of terror, any potential alternatives seeming destined for “discursive appropriation” by the insidious vocabulary of late biopolitical capitalism. Fatigued, but not yet resigned, Notes sets out “to rethink the speech (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Invoking Darkness: Skotison, Scalar Derangement, and Inhuman Rhetoric.Pilsch Andrew - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):336-355.
    In a recent article on Burke and the emergence of nonhuman rhetoric, Steven B. Katz argues for a syncretic view of this rhetorical turn, despite it being inspired by a number of different philosophical perspectives: “To varying degrees, these new philosophies, loosely collected under the nomer New Materialisms, seem to be in a process of sublimating if not supplanting and replacing the physical human body as the source of motivated agency, intelligence, audience, and language, the traditional subjects of most rhetorical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  1
    Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly by Judith Butler.Lee M. Price - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):356-362.
    In 2011, when Judith Butler delivered the lecture series that would become Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, the speech act theorist joined other critical scholars attempting to work through the dark cloud of neoliberal fatigue settling over the humanities. “Identitarian ontologies” had become only more entrenched in the age of terror, any potential alternatives seeming destined for “discursive appropriation” by the insidious vocabulary of late biopolitical capitalism. Fatigued, but not yet resigned, Notes sets out “to rethink the speech (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Circulated Epideictic: The Technical Image and Digital Consensus.Rice Jeff - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):272-291.
    Consider the notion that the Internet leads to consensus. The so called echo chamber theory suggests that like-minded individuals join each other’s social networks online and thus are receptive to only beliefs and opinions they already maintain. Online tools, the theory claims, such as the Facebook like button and Twitter’s heart-shaped like reinforce preestablished online behaviors of agreement. Paul Adams, Facebook’s former head of brand design, calls this process social proof. “We copy other people’s behavior,” he writes, “especially people like (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  1
    The Politics of Pain Medicine: A Rhetorical-Ontological Inquiry by S. Scott Graham.Stormer Nathan - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):362-367.
    The contemporary moment in rhetoric studies is complex, marked by a number of powerful currents pulling scholarship in new directions. One of those currents is the deepening engagement with science and technology studies through rhetorical investigations of medicine, environmental policy, and science. Another is the increasing experimentation with qualitative methodologies, often called “rhetorical ethnography.” A third is the rapidly developing encounter with interwoven philosophies of speculative realism, object-oriented ontology, and new materialism. If you are interested in any of these, you (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  6
    Anachronism in Recent Moral Philosophy.Whistler Daniel - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (3):247-271.
    In this article, I examine a distinctive position in moral philosophy that, following Bernard Williams, I label “postanalytic”. In one of his final essays, “What Might Philosophy Become?”, Williams sets out a program for extending moral philosophy beyond its traditional “limits” in a way that will transform it into an embodied, historical, and political form of reflective practice.1 This programmatic intent has been shared by a number of moral philosophers since, some of whom are expressly influenced by Williams’s late work. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  9
    The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical Problem of Persuasion by James L. Kastely.Arthur E. Walzer - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):228-232.
    In chapters on the Gorgias and the Meno in his 1997 From Plato to Postmodernism, James Kasterly argues that an important point made in the Gorgias is that Socrates fails to persuade Callicles. Its lesson is that philosophers will never succeed in persuading nonphilosophers if they rely on dialectic, with its premises grounded in epistemology, and in the Meno, he finds a type of dialectic that functions rhetorically. In this new book, The Rhetoric of Plato's "Republic": Democracy and the Philosophical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  1
    Rhetoric and Power: The Drama of Classical Greece by Nathan Crick.Richard Leo Enos - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):233-238.
    Aristotle's Organon provides an ingeniously systematic way to identify the discrete nature of disciplines that concern human thought and expression. While such an approach helps to understand the unique properties that warrant the recognition of disciplines as discrete, Aristotle's system of classification does not capture well the dynamics, synergy, and symbiotic relationships that appear when disciplines intersect. Perhaps, in fairness to Aristotle, his task was not to explore such relationships, but that does not mean that we should not try to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  1
    Transient Apostle: Paul, Travel, and the Rhetoric of Empire by Timothy Luckritz Marquis.Geraths Cory - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):238-245.
    Rhetorics of travel wander across millennia and media. Travel speaks to our inborn interest in the outside and in the other and, as a topos, it enables us to communicate in diverse ways and to divergent communities. Turning to the rhetorical power of travel invites reconsideration of the communicative interplay of governments and cultures, of movements and ideas. Timothy Luckritz Marquis's Transient Apostle: Paul, Travel, and the Rhetoric of Empire explores Paul's cultural transgressions through a study of travel in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  3
    The Suddener World: Photography and Ineffable Rhetoric.Ingraham Chris - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):129-152.
    Before photography went digital and camera phones accompanied people most everywhere, Pierre Bourdieu observed in 1965 that photography had become a "middle-brow art". "How and why," he asked, "is the practice of photography predisposed to a diffusion so wide that there are few households, at least in towns, which do not possess a camera?". Novel at the time, the question has been superseded today. Estimates indicate that 1.27 trillion new photographs will be taken in 2017. That amounts to an ambient (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  6
    The Future of Knowing and Values: Information Technologies and Plato's Critique of Rhetoric.B. Levin Susan - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):153-177.
    The most contentious issue in current debates about human enhancement is whether it properly belongs to human aspiration to outstrip our human ceiling in cognition and longevity so radically that the result would not be improved human beings but instead "posthumans." Transhumanists answer strongly in the affirmative and hence vigorously support our directing available and foreseeable technologies to that end. According to Nick Bostrom, transhumanism is "an outgrowth of secular humanism and the Enlightenment." Our "ceasing to be human is [not] (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  2
    Rhetorical Deliberation, Memory, and Sensation in the Thought of Thomas Aquinas.Jordan Loveridge - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):178-200.
    Scholastic philosophy is often associated with dialectical reasoning and the consideration of universal theses, in contrast to the variable and practical questions considered by disciplines such as politics and rhetoric. However, while the primacy of dialectical inquiry in Scholastic thought is difficult to deny, the movement also produced advances in rhetorical theory as well. Specifically, I argue that the works of Thomas Aquinas present a view of rhetorical reasoning and deliberation aligned closely with the virtue of prudence and dependent on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  2
    Against the Droid's "Instrument of Efficiency," For Animalizing Technologies in a Posthumanist Spirit.Pfister Damien Smith - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (2):201-227.
    The author had had a plan for a kind of melodrama constructed around two orders of motivation. In the foreground of the stage, there was to be a series of realistic incidents, dealing with typical human situations, such as family quarrels, scenes at a business office, lovers during courtship, a public address by a spell-binder, etc. In the background, like a set of comments on this action, there was to be a primeval forest filled with mythically prehistoric monsters, marauding and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  1
    Civic Jazz by Gregory Clark.Charland Maurice - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):119-125.
    Civic Jazz asks us to expand our understanding of what it means to say that jazz is an American art form. While Clark is clearly a fan, with an intimate knowledge of jazz, its culture, and community, this book offers more than anecdote and description, which is so common in jazz studies. Rather, this well-crafted book extends and offers a theoretical basis to the idea, put forward by Wynton Marsalis, Albert Murray, Ralph Ellison, and most recently Barak Obama when speaking (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  6
    Language and the Logic of Subjectivity: Whitehead and Burke in Crisis.DiCaglio Joshua - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):96-118.
    Bruno Latour, the increasingly popular French philosopher and foundational thinker for science studies, once wrote: “I know neither who I am nor what I want, but others say they know on my behalf, others who will define me, link me up, make me speak, interpret what I say, and enroll me”. This invocation of an “other” as a self-definition is no longer surprising nor radical but has long been a common answer to Plato’s famous and persistent insistence that we must, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. In Memoriam: Lloyd Bitzer.Hauser Gerard - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):vi.
    Lloyd Bitzer’s passing came as deeply sad news. He was an exceptional person in all respects. I was fortunate to have been his student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and to have experienced Lloyd in my life as a mentor, a colleague in the discipline, a confidant, a friend, and a role model. The discipline of rhetoric was fortunate to have had him among its ranks as a leading theorist. He was among those most responsible for pushing rhetorical studies into (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Rhetorical Trajectories From the Early Heidegger.L. Marshall David - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):50-72.
    In the early work of Martin Heidegger, I argue, we can confect a particular and particularly useful conception of rhetoric as a capacity to articulate situatedness by means, in part, of a more precise vocabulary for what I call the phenomena of everydayness. One aspect of this claim is that rhetoric is a diagnostic of established positions. Practicing what I preach, my first task here is to articulate as synoptically as possible the established positions on the topic at hand. In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  3
    The Rhetorical Aesthetics of More: On Archival Magnitude.Rice Jenny - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):26-49.
    Lizard people, chemtrails, Illuminati, toxic fluoride in the water, radio-controlled chip implants, Jewish cabals, secret NASA technology, poisoned vaccinations, the shooting down of Pan Am Flight 103, government-sponsored brain washing, one-world government, JFK killed by the CIA, JFK killed by the mafia, staged moon landings, alien bodies hidden in military bunkers, Paul is dead, Tupac is alive. Conspiracy theories are endless. Not only are there many of them, but each theory is awash in details that connect innumerable dots. In thinking (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    Kant on the Power and Limits of Pathos: Toward a "Critique of Poetic Rhetoric".Stoner Samuel - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):73-95.
    Upon first encountering Immanuel Kant’s 1766 essay Dreams of a Spirit-Seer Elucidated by Dreams of Metaphysics, one is immediately struck by its literary style. Indeed, Dreams constitutes a unique moment in Kant’s literary development—never before had he thrown himself with such fervor into the attempt to express his thoughts in a provocative manner, and never again would he indulge his poetic tendencies with such reckless abandon. Unsurprisingly, then, Kant’s poetic rhetoric in Dreams has long puzzled readers. Immediately following the essay’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Thinking Ecologically About Rhetoric's Ontology: Capacity, Vulnerability, and Resilience.Stormer Nathan & McGreavy Bridie - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):1-25.
    1st Gent.: Our deeds are fetters that we forge ourselves. 2d Gent.: Ay, truly: but I think it is the world that brings the iron. R. L. Scott once explained that the “environment is experienced as being rhetorical,” meaning anything within the milieu can participate in addressivity, that who or what addresses what and whom is variable and multiple. He stressed that human valuing determined participation, but he nonetheless anticipated a more robust, posthuman ecological view when he contended that “one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues