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  1.  1
    Academic Freedom’s Rhetorical “Gray Zone”.Michael Bernard-Donals - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):90-96.
    ABSTRACT The tension between freedom of speech and academic freedom results from the contradiction between democracy and expertise, resulting in a rhetorical “gray zone” that stymies faculty appeals to due process and constitutional protection. It’s not so much that certain “uncivil” words and utterances cannot be said in this gray zone; it’s that such words, when said, require one’s ejection from the demos. In an examination of the case of Steven Salaita, I’ll show how the tyranny of the demos, in (...)
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  2. The Meanings of What Can(Not) Be Said.Kundai Chirindo - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):25-31.
    "Hapana zvaataura." Far from simply portending the limits of speech or signaling the always futile attempt at censorship, the question of what cannot be said invites examination of speech as such; about what it can and cannot be, and about its conditions of possibility. In part, that is because speech, like its homologue, rhetoric, "is intransitive". What it is and what it does are unstable, changing from context to context even as it remains a human universal. It is difficult to (...)
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  3. Esta Chingadera.Ralph Cintrón - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):13-18.
    ABSTRACT This essay reflects on how the pandemic has intensified long-standing discussions regarding race, Blackness, white privilege and supremacy, settler colonialism, social justice, and more. I draw from forty years of ethnographic fieldwork or being part of the departmental leadership of Latin American and Latino Studies at my university. This essay uses propositional logic to establish a poetics of radical compassion as prior to radical politics, followed by the “scenic” as evidence to “prove” that paradox is our living condition. In (...)
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  4. Uncommonplaces of Rhetoric.José Manuel Cortez & Michael J. Kennedy - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):97-103.
    In August 2021, U.S. Customs and Border Protection apprehended 18,492 unaccompanied children migrating alone across the U.S./Mexico border.1 And as of September 2021, 144,834 unaccompanied children from Central America have been detained for the year by the federal government. To contextualize these numbers, the Obama administration declared a humanitarian crisis at the border in 2014, when 68,541 unaccompanied children were apprehended across the entire year. U.S. federal law defines an unaccompanied child as a minor with neither "lawful immigration status in (...)
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  5.  2
    What Cannot Be Said: The Path of Silence.James Crosswhite & June Manuel - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):47-52.
    ABSTRACT Freedom of speech and speech suppression have become fraught notions, and the question of what cannot be said is near the heart of the matter. In this essay, we describe some of the current challenges to free speech and then take up an exploration of a different but relevant “cannot be said”—silence—and inquire into its importance for a fuller understanding of freedom, speech, and “what cannot be said.”.
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  6. What Cannot Be Said?Erik Doxtader - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):1-3.
    What cannot be said? The question presses, as there are no words, or no fitting words, or no words that make sense let alone do justice, all perhaps in the face of demands to speak. And, as voice collapses in the midst of the violence that confounds reference, degrades language, imposes silence, and enforces repression—what cannot be said may turn on privation, the grounds, incentives, and intentions of expression that are banished, disappeared, and colonized, often in the name of deterring (...)
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  7.  1
    The Silence of Technology.Elizabeth S. Goodstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):4-12.
    ABSTRACT This essay meditates on the entanglement of history and memory with forgetfulness, with silencing, with what is before or outside speech. Recalling along the way a few of the manifold varieties of the unthinkable made manifest in recent events, it notes the same mute iteration that led Freud to the death drive, only to be troubled once again by the very same repetitions enfolded in the diagnosis of cultural malaise Freud built upon his insight. Turning to Georg Simmel’s Philosophy (...)
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  8.  5
    When “I’M Sorry” Cannot Be Said: The Evolution of Political Apology.Jacob Justice & Brett Bricker - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):111-118.
    ABSTRACT Every social order depends on a pathway to atonement for those who breach behavioral expectations. However, observers from a variety of fields now agree that the United States has entered an age of non-apology, where the two words “I’m sorry” simply cannot be said, particularly by powerful men facing allegations of sexual misconduct. This essay draws attention to, and comments upon, this trend. We first identify the sociopolitical factors that have inaugurated the era of non-apology, namely growing political polarization. (...)
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  9. What Cannot Be Said? “Equity Achieved”.Mari Lee Mifsud - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):71-75.
    ABSTRACT In contemporary U.S. public discourse, calls for achieving equity abound. Many metrics now measure equity being achieved. I inquire into whether equity can be said to be achieved and still be equity. Inquiring as such leads me to excavating the menacing and actual cultural violence of developing such achievement. Simultaneously, this excavation shows the rhetoric of equity qua equity as a means of abolishing the conditions for that violence to take hold. I put forward that equity cannot be said (...)
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  10. Un-Speaking Manichaeism.Reingard Nethersole - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):19-24.
    ABSTRACT When enmity seizes language, speech needs be silenced to give meaningful communication a chance. But current Manichean structures making life a moral battleground have to first be undone to make shared problem solving possible. It is suggested that a rhetoric of the essay is better suited to this task than the rhetoric of speech.
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  11. What Cannot Be Done.Omedi Ochieng - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):53-59.
    ABSTRACT This essay argues that recent catastrophizings over freedom of speech are symptoms of a conjunctural crisis in the North Atlantic world. They index, in the main, a crisis of profitability and deindustrialization in the Global North, as seen for instance in the lumpenproletariatization of the working and professional classes; increasing domestic resistance by racially minoritized groups to police violence and murder; sustained insurgencies to imperialism abroad; the militarization of borders; and widespread crises occasioned by climate change. The writings of (...)
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  12.  1
    Speech in Pursuit of Silence.Robin Reames - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):32-39.
    ABSTRACT In the West’s Will to Know and its attendant rhetorical forms, speech has been related to silence in primarily three ways. In rhetoric and dialectic, speech pursues speech; in rhetorical education, silence pursues speech; and in sacred, ascetic rhetoric, silence pursues silence. These three relations of speech to silence as a form of knowledge in the Western rhetorical tradition leave a fourth untraversed. Yet to be explored is speech in pursuit of silence. This essay turns to the Buddhist tradition (...)
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  13. Forum of Conscience: Entry and Exit Prohibited.Philippe-Joseph Salazar - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):40-46.
    Lest we forget, rhetoric is joined at the hip to politics, and to the law. Sophists taught politicking by teaching rhetoric, and devised constitutions. There is no departing from this original sense: the force of law is germane to the force of words, and the force of words to the enforcing of laws, formal or natural. Depending upon the jurisdiction under which we happen to live, there are single words we cannot utter in public, there are statements that cannot be (...)
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  14.  4
    Anxiety of the Influencer: Hannah Arendt and the Problem with Social Media.James Ogden Sharpe - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):104-110.
    ABSTRACT Hannah Arendt’s conception of “the social” offers a novel perspective on contemporary debates over social media. Both critics and defenders of social media giants such as Facebook construe the problem with social media as a proliferation of untruths that is either the cost of liberalism or a danger requiring regulations. Arendt would have us be dubious of both conclusions while also rejecting both sets of premises. Rather, Arendt’s framework allows a diagnosis of the problem with social media as a (...)
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  15.  6
    Silence at the Meta-Level: A Story About Argumentative Cruelty.Katharina Stevens - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):76-82.
    I think that most people have a collection of memories that arise unbidden. Here is one of mine: in my second year of university, I participated in an argument about some radical claim, I do not remember which. We were being analytic philosophers of the blood-sport type and we had fun. Or most of us did. Not the first-year student who got cornered. She was struggling to formulate a reason that was very important to her. But barraged with objections, she (...)
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  16. What Is Performative Activism?A. Freya Thimsen - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):83-89.
    Reactions to the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor in 2020 included political speech from white liberals that seemed to be too little, too late. Following the controversial Blackout Tuesday action, in which many people blacked out their social media profile photographs, the term "performative activism" began circulating even more widely as an accusation describing shallow, ineffective, or insincere attempts to jump on the antiracist bandwagon mainly to self-promote and build one's own personal or corporate progressive credibility. Corporations may (...)
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  17.  5
    Mind the Gap: Kairos in the Spaces of Silence.Christopher W. Tindale - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):66-70.
    ABSTRACT Discourses conceal as much as they reveal, but in their concealment they may invite an audience into the silences of the gaps and pauses they contain in order to reflect and find insight. The moments of opportunity provided by these gaps suggest two sides to the concept of kairos, capturing both the ability of the author/speaker to create the opportune moment in the discourse, and the ability of the reader/listener to see that moment and the experience it invites.
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  18.  2
    The Words of Socrates and James Joyce.Donald Phillip Verene - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):60-65.
    ABSTRACT Philosophy joined with rhetoric is a means to speak fully about the human condition. Socrates’s statement concerning the “unexamined life” and Joyce’s manner of “two thinks at a time” are examples of how to approach the human condition. They show us ways we can speak of our humanity and ways that we cannot.
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  19. Rhetorical Hesitancy.Jack Wallace - 2022 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 55 (1):119-126.
    Were pestilential contagion proved unquestionably to exist, sanitary laws would notwithstanding be unjustifiable. … The terror occasioned by the application of sanitary laws, superadded to a lesser degree of the proper cause of epidemics would otherwise be sufficient to produce disease, will occasion sickness, misery, and death. There are also a variety of ways, besides its direct operation on the mind of the sufferer, in which the terror incidental to the operation of sanitary laws, combined with that which the result (...)
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