Year:

  1.  3
    Editor's Note: In Transition, a Moment for Gratitude. Doxtader - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):v.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. In Transition, a Moment for Gratitude.Erik Doxtader - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):v-vii.
    With this issue, Philosophy & Rhetoric begins its fifty-first year. It is an honor to play a role in this turn and a privilege to serve the journal as editor.Looking back for a moment, I remember my first encounter with P&R as a young graduate student at Northwestern—Tom Farrell gave me the galleys of a forthcoming article, a gift that led me into the journal's archive and left me to hope that my first piece of scholarship would appear in its (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    Is the Enthymeme a Syllogism?James Fredal - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):24-49.
    For several millennia now, the enthymeme has been taught, on the putative authority of Aristotle, as "a kind of syllogism" —that is, a rhetorical syllogism—that consists in a three-part unit of deductive reasoning that parallels the inductive reasoning of the example. The rhetorical syllogism is said to be imperfect or incomplete because it relies on probable or particular rather than certain or universal premises and because the speaker suppresses one premise or the conclusion, usually the major premise, leaving it with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    The Persuasive Force of Demanding.Beth Innocenti & Nichole Kathol - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):50-72.
    A paradigm case of demanding involves making utterances designed to influence addressees to accede.1 It would be incoherent to say, "I demand that you do x, but I am not saying that you ought to do x," or "I demand that you do x, although I am fully aware that you cannot do x." The extraordinary nature of demanding may be gleaned from anomalous utterances such as "employees may demand time off by notifying scheduling managers at least one month in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. The Cartesian Eye Without Organs: The Shaping of Subjectivity in Descartes's Optics.Ryan Johnson - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):73-90.
    For there are human beings who lack everything except one thing of which they have too much—human beings who are nothing but a big eye.In the opening of the Dioptrique, René Descartes refers to an uneducated Dutch artisan named Jacques Métius who enjoyed tinkering with mirrors and glass. Métius's avocation eventually led to the discovery of one of the most important tools in modern science. One day, while considering two lenses he had recently ground into the usual spherical shape, "one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Beyond Native and Alien: Nietzsche, Literally.E. A. Kiss - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):1-23.
    As a still quite young professor of classical philology at the University of Basel, Nietzsche taught a rather traditional, almost antiquarian, course on ancient rhetoric. The title of his 1872–73 lecture notes—"Presentation of Ancient Rhetoric" —clearly indicates that this time Nietzsche did not spoil for a fight or set out to uncover the hidden hybridity of origins as he did in his controversial book of the same year in which the origin of Greek tragedy is revealed as miscegenation between the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  4
    Rhetoric and the Gift: Ancient Rhetorical Theory and Contemporary Communication by Mari Lee Mifsud.Susannah Ryan - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):91-97.
    As we so often trip about and lose our breath over speaking precisely to "what is rhetoric?," it should come to no surprise that being asked what we want of rhetoric, of language, of an other moves us to fidget, even brings us to blush. But if we pause with these questions, lips parted without yet the words to answer, we may notice a peculiar craving that churns before the naming. We want of rhetoric—but what? We are compelled toward rhetoric—whereto? (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  2
    Books of Interest. Schaukowitch & Kennedy - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):98.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues