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  1. Sophistical Practice: Toward a Consistent Relativism by Barbara Cassin.Michelle Ballif - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):202-206.
    "When you find yourself neck deep in shit, start making bricks," or so I was advised by Luanne T. Frank, a faculty member during my graduate days, who was deftly "translating" Heidegger for us during one class session. And now, decades later, I look around and think, "I'd better get busy, really busy."With that prelude, and apologies to those weak of stomach or imagination—but this is not the time to be queasy—I approach Barbara Cassin's Sophistical Practice: Toward a Consistent Relativism. (...)
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  2. Recuperating the Real: New Materialism, Object-Oriented Ontology, and Neo-Lacanian Ontical Cartography.Caleb Cates, M. Lane Bruner & I. I. I. Joseph T. Moss - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):151-175.
    The spring, summer, and fall 2006 editions of Critical Inquiry hosted a heated exchange between Ernesto Laclau and Slavoj Žižek regarding the proper definition of the Lacanian Real. Žižek claims "the Real is the inexorable abstract spectral logic of capital that determines what goes on in social reality". In response, Laclau states that Žižek's "spectral logic of capital" is a gross distortion of Lacanian theory: "The Real is not a specifiable object endowed with laws of movement on its own but, (...)
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  3.  1
    Recuperating the Real: New Materialism, Object-Oriented Ontology, and Neo-Lacanian Ontical Cartography. Cates, Bruner & Moss - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):151.
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  4. Of Exterior and Exception: Latin American Rhetoric, Subalternity, and the Politics of Cultural Difference.José M. Cortez - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):124.
    The question of non-Western cultural difference has come to feature prominently within rhetorical studies as a topic of lively and contentious debate.1 Recently, this debate has been taken up in the context of Latin America, where responses to this question turn on the presupposition of a foundational and irreducible difference between categories of the West and the non-West—the latter of which holds the figure of a putative subaltern subject for whom critics have set out to develop a democratic politics of (...)
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  5. Kant and the Promise of Rhetoric by Scott R. Stroud.G. L. Ercolini - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):207-211.
    For Hannah Arendt, the promise serves as currency in a world where predictability of outcome in the realm of human action is impossible, where courage is required in order to submit oneself in word and deed in the public realm, and where forgiveness serves as recourse when things go differently than hoped. Each of these points in Arendt's political philosophy is indebted to Immanuel Kant, a thinker who is often characterized as rejecting rhetoric on aesthetic and moral grounds alike. In (...)
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  6. Toward a Peircean Approach to Perlocution.Jeoffrey Gaspard - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):105.
    In their Foundations of Illocutionary Logic, John Searle and Daniel Vanderveken suggest that utterances cannot be regarded as conventional performances of perlocutionary acts because "there could not be any convention to the effect that such and such an utterance counts as convincing you, or persuading you, or annoying you, or exasperating you, or amusing you." "None of these perlocutionary verbs," they add, "has a performative use" because, in the case of a hypothetical "I hereby persuade you, for instance," "there is (...)
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  7. Books of Interest. Schaukowitch & Kennedy - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):212.
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  8.  1
    Rhetorical Action in Rektoratsrede: Calling Heidegger's Gefolgschaft.Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (2):176.
    This is the eloquence that sometimes tears up all before it like a whirlwind.The passionateness and attunement of knowing and questioning are decisively intended in the "rectoral address."There is a long philosophical tradition, reaching back to Plato's Gorgias, that insulates the question of the wisdom of a philosopher from the power of his language. This tradition may partly explain the dearth of literature on Martin Heidegger's rhetoric in debates surrounding his political engagement with National Socialism. This, even though there is (...)
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  9.  4
    Editor's Note: In Transition, a Moment for Gratitude. Doxtader - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):v.
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  10.  4
    In Transition, a Moment for Gratitude.Erik Doxtader - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):v-vii.
    With this issue, Philosophy & Rhetoric begins its fifty-first year. It is an honor to play a role in this turn and a privilege to serve the journal as editor.Looking back for a moment, I remember my first encounter with P&R as a young graduate student at Northwestern—Tom Farrell gave me the galleys of a forthcoming article, a gift that led me into the journal's archive and left me to hope that my first piece of scholarship would appear in its (...)
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  11.  3
    Is the Enthymeme a Syllogism? Fredal - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):24-49.
    For several millennia now, the enthymeme has been taught, on the putative authority of Aristotle, as "a kind of syllogism" —that is, a rhetorical syllogism—that consists in a three-part unit of deductive reasoning that parallels the inductive reasoning of the example. The rhetorical syllogism is said to be imperfect or incomplete because it relies on probable or particular rather than certain or universal premises and because the speaker suppresses one premise or the conclusion, usually the major premise, leaving it with (...)
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  12.  4
    The Persuasive Force of Demanding. Innocenti & Kathol - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):50-72.
    A paradigm case of demanding involves making utterances designed to influence addressees to accede.1 It would be incoherent to say, "I demand that you do x, but I am not saying that you ought to do x," or "I demand that you do x, although I am fully aware that you cannot do x." The extraordinary nature of demanding may be gleaned from anomalous utterances such as "employees may demand time off by notifying scheduling managers at least one month in (...)
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  13.  3
    The Cartesian Eye Without Organs: The Shaping of Subjectivity in Descartes's Optics. Johnson - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):73-90.
    For there are human beings who lack everything except one thing of which they have too much—human beings who are nothing but a big eye.In the opening of the Dioptrique, René Descartes refers to an uneducated Dutch artisan named Jacques Métius who enjoyed tinkering with mirrors and glass. Métius's avocation eventually led to the discovery of one of the most important tools in modern science. One day, while considering two lenses he had recently ground into the usual spherical shape, "one (...)
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  14.  2
    Beyond Native and Alien: Nietzsche, Literally. Kiss - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):1-23.
    As a still quite young professor of classical philology at the University of Basel, Nietzsche taught a rather traditional, almost antiquarian, course on ancient rhetoric. The title of his 1872–73 lecture notes—"Presentation of Ancient Rhetoric" —clearly indicates that this time Nietzsche did not spoil for a fight or set out to uncover the hidden hybridity of origins as he did in his controversial book of the same year in which the origin of Greek tragedy is revealed as miscegenation between the (...)
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  15.  5
    Rhetoric and the Gift: Ancient Rhetorical Theory and Contemporary Communication by Mari Lee Mifsud.Susannah Ryan - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):91-97.
    As we so often trip about and lose our breath over speaking precisely to "what is rhetoric?," it should come to no surprise that being asked what we want of rhetoric, of language, of an other moves us to fidget, even brings us to blush. But if we pause with these questions, lips parted without yet the words to answer, we may notice a peculiar craving that churns before the naming. We want of rhetoric—but what? We are compelled toward rhetoric—whereto? (...)
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  16.  4
    Books of Interest. Schaukowitch & Kennedy - 2018 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 51 (1):98.
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