Year:

  1.  8
    Neither Straight Nor Crooked: Poetry as Performative Dialectics in the Five Ranks Philosophy of Zen Buddhism.Christopher Byrne - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):661-678.
    In traditional and popular accounts, Zen Buddhism is depicted as a practice that rejects literary study and intellectualization in favor of a direct experience of enlightenment that is beyond words. Indeed, the Zen school has traditionally defined itself as a "separate transmission outside the teachings, not dependent on words and letters". Even when regarding the tradition's literary output, Zen literature is famous for its antinomian dialogues replete with outrageous antics, frequent non sequiturs, and crude, illiterate utterances that appear to validate (...)
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  2.  16
    Moments of Reticence in the Analects and Wittgenstein.Thomas D. Carroll - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):679-698.
    For perhaps obvious reasons, reticence is not likely to recommend itself as a category with which to perform cross-cultural studies in philosophy. Again, to risk stating the obvious, the theme of reticence would in this context concern what philosophical arguments and texts leave unsaid as well as explicitly advise an audience to leave unsaid. By fixing our attention to gaps, silences, and times where the subject is changed as well as when any of the advice above is explicitly recommended, new (...)
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  3.  6
    The Analects of Dasan, Volume II: A Korean Syncretic Reading by Jeong Yak-Yong, And: The Analects of Dasan, Volume III: A Korean Syncretic Reading by Jeong Yak-Yong.Dobin Choi - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):1-5.
    These two volumes of the Analects of Dasan indicate that Hongkyung Kim's translation project has passed the halfway mark to the completion of a six-volume set of Noneo Gogeum Ju ) written by Dasan Jeong Yak-yong. This series basically delivers Dasan's commentaries on the Analects, but his meticulous and critical investigations about all the resources accessible to him, from the ancient Chinese commentaries of He Yan to the views of Japanese scholars such as Dazai Zun, allow us to engage comprehensive (...)
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  4.  2
    Pac-Man to the Rescue? Conceptuality and Non-Conceptuality in the Dharmakīrtian Theory of Pseudo-Perception.John D. Dunne - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):571-593.
    The essays that follow grew out of a workshop held at the Center for Buddhist Studies, University of California, Berkeley, in March 2018, on the topic of conceptuality and non-conceptuality in Buddhist philosophy. Discussions at the workshop focused specifically on the tenability of the claim made by the two Buddhist epistemologists Dignāga and Dharmakīrti that perceptual cognitions are non-conceptual and yet also contribute to the contents of conceptual thought. The four contributions collected here present just a few of the resulting (...)
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  5.  3
    Expressing the Heart's Intent: Explorations in Chinese Aesthetics by Marthe Atwater Chandler.James Garrison - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):1-3.
    Upon completing Marthe Atwater Chandler's Expressing the Heart's Intent: Explorations in Chinese Aesthetics I am struck by how much can be gleaned retroactively from the title. At the outset the title indeed made me somewhat wary, having seen how on many occasions Chinese philosophical terms become mangled in English-language translation in ways that unnecessarily import, either implicitly or explicitly, misleading conceptual frameworks. Words like "expressing," "heart," and "intent" all triggered various suspicions on my part. Fortunately, these suspicions were quickly addressed, (...)
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  6.  2
    Cultivating Weeds: The Place of Solitude in the Political Philosophies of Ibn Bājja and Nietzsche.Peter S. Groff - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):699-739.
    To live alone one must be a beast or god—says Aristotle. Leaving out the third case: one must be both—a philosopher.In this article I examine the central role that solitude plays in the political thought of Ibn Bājja and Friedrich Nietzsche. These two thinkers come from disparate milieus, are separated by a variety of historical, linguistic, cultural and theologico-political boundaries, and espouse seemingly antipodal worldviews.1 Yet they share certain concerns about the proper place of the philosopher that set them apart (...)
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  7.  1
    The Myth of a Kantian Avicenna.Dimitri Gutas - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):833-840.
    In my Oriens article on Avicenna's empiricism, I present what Avicenna calls the principles of syllogism, which are the different types of propositions that form the irreducible and axiomatic starting points of syllogisms and definitions. As Avicenna states both explicitly and implicitly in numerous passages that I cite, these are all based on experience. Two of these are the primary propositions and those with built-in syllogisms, literally, "premises of fiṭra syllogisms," fiṭra being the natural operation of the intellect—thus, "premises whose (...)
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  8.  1
    The Tension Between Divine Command Theory and Utilitarianism in Mozi and George Berkeley: A Comparison.Michael Hemmingsen - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):740-756.
    Mozi and George Berkeley are philosophers who are not often put into conversation. However, I argue that comparing them can shed some light on the relationship between certain philosophical positions and their resulting moral philosophies. Specifically, I will draw attention to the way that their lack of interest in an appearance-reality distinction and in "essence" gives rise to a tension between consequentialism and divine command theory. These similarities exist despite the fact that Mozi and Berkeley otherwise have quite distinct views. (...)
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  9.  3
    Hui Shi's Monism: A Russellian Interpretation.Liu Jingxian & Li Mao - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):781-800.
    A dilemma in interpreting Hui Shi's ten theses is that they are understandable only in the light of relativistic pluralism, which conflicts with his own main theme of absolutistic monism. However, after a careful investigation of the evolutionary paths of the tense and aspect uses of the temporal adverb fang 方 in classical Chinese language, a construction argument can be made for fang sheng fang si 方 生 方 死. But before presenting this construction argument, we first introduce the dilemma (...)
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  10.  82
    Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  11.  7
    Beyond Time, Not Before Time: The Pratyabhijñā S'aiva Critique of Dharmakīrti on the Reality of Beginningless Conceptual Differentiation.Catherine Prueitt - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):594-614.
    The influential apoha theory of concept formation of the seventh-century Buddhist Dharmakīrti stands as a philosophically powerful articulation of how language could work in the absence of real universals. In brief, Dharmakīrti argues that concepts are constructed through a goaloriented process that delimits the content of an experience by ignoring whatever does not conform to one's conditioned expectations. There are no real similarities that ground this process. Rather, a concept is merely what's left over once one has glossed over enough (...)
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  12.  2
    Beyond the Troubled Water of Shifei: From Disputation to Walking-Two-Roads in the Zhuangzi by Lin Ma and Jaap van Brakel.Frank P. Saunders Jr - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):1-4.
    One of the most important challenges for scholars of Chinese and comparative philosophy is adopting a methodology for engaging with source texts in a way that enables us to accurately reflect the intentions of the authors, acknowledge the linguistic, historical, and philosophical context of the text in question, avoid unconscious modern, Western, or other provincial biases that may be projected on the text, and fruitfully develop the ideas in the text, among other interpretively virtuous constraints. In the present volume, Lin (...)
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  13.  3
    Mind and Body in Early China: Beyond Orientalism and the Myth of Holism by Edward Slingerland.Bongrae Seok - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):1-6.
    In this book, Edward Slingerland criticizes and rejects a pervasive and widely accepted viewpoint in Chinese philosophy: holism. Simply speaking, holism is a non-discrete and non-analytic pattern of thinking that avoids the adoption of mutually exclusive and dualistic concepts such as mind-body, theory-practice, reason-emotion, and macrocosm-microcosm typically found in many Western philosophical theories. In the context of Chinese philosophy, it is understood as an interpretational framework where Chinese philosophy is characterized as a fundamentally and essentially non-dualistic system of thought. According (...)
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  14.  5
    Buddhist Non-Conceptualism: Building a Smart Border Wall.Mark Siderits - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):615-637.
    Ever since Dignāga drew his bright line between conceptually mediated inference and concept-free perception, there have been efforts to erase it and make cross-border traffic in concepts perfectly legitimate.1 If we understand conceptualization as a mental operation of abstraction that yields knowledge of general, repeatable features or commonalities and facilitates such cognitive operations as categorization, inference, and analogical thought, then we can add Kant to the list of prominent critics of Dignāga's border wall. Here I shall first describe how this (...)
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  15.  5
    Differing Views on Heaven's Role in Accounts of Undeserved Hardship in Early China.Yunwoo Song - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):801-818.
    There is [that which is controlled by] Heaven, and there is [that which is within the power of] man, and each has its separate lot. Once one has examined the division between Heaven and man, one will know how to act.1Since the discovery of the Guodian 郭 店 manuscripts in 1993, the Qiongda yi shi 窮 達 以 時 has gathered much attention, mainly thanks to this opening line, which practically invalidates the previously widely held belief that the division between (...)
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  16.  2
    Contemporary Non-Conceptualism, Conceptual Inclusivism, and the Yogācāra View of Language Use as Skillful Action.Roy Tzohar - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):638-660.
    According to the early Yogācāra, following non-conceptual awareness, the advanced bodhisattva is said to attain a state characterized by a "subsequent awareness". Yogācāra thinkers identify this state with ultimate knowledge of causality and view it as involving a unique kind of conceptual activity and propositional attitudes, which are very different, however, from ordinary conceptual awareness insofar as they do not involve vikalpa. Translated back into the terms of some version of the contemporary debate between conceptualists and nonconceptualists, this would amount (...)
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  17.  4
    Avicenna's Notion of Fiṭrīyāt: A Comment on Dimitri Gutas' Interpretation.Mohammad Saleh Zarepour - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):819-833.
    In an illuminating article, Dimitri Gutas has tried to show that Avicenna's theory of knowledge should be understood within a full-blown empiricist framework very similar to that of John Locke.1 Gutas' argument is based on an analysis of Avicennian 'principles of syllogism'2. The principles of syllogism are those judgments and propositions that form the irreducible and axiomatic foundations of syllogisms and definitions.3 Avicenna categorizes these principles based on how we accept and acknowledge the truth of them. This categorization appears, with (...)
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  18.  1
    Non-Innate A Priori Knowledge in Avicenna.Mohammad Saleh Zarepour - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):841-848.
    In his "The Empiricism of Avicenna," Dimitri Gutas interprets Avicenna as an empiricist.1 He analyzes Avicennian 'principles of syllogism' and claims that none of them are a priori. Moreover, regarding awwalīyāt and fiṭrīyāt—which are two groups of such principles—Gutas suggests that "[i]t appears that both kinds of propositions would be analytic, in Kantian terms. As for Locke, they would be what he called 'trifling.'"2 In my first comment in this issue, I disagreed with this view and argued that these two (...)
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  19.  6
    The Hermeneutics of Experience: Schleiermacher and Nishitani on the Essence of Religion.Raquel Bouso - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):265-284.
    Abe Masao 阿部正雄 is accepted by many as a member of the Kyoto School of philosophy, known primarily for its role in drawing together distinct traditions of Western and Asian thought.1 Abe was a key figure in this respect, dedicating much of his career to dialogue with Western philosophers and theologians.2 Through his many essays, translations, lectures, and conversations, Abe brought Zen Buddhism to audiences in Europe and the United States. In particular, he introduced his own interpretation of the philosophy (...)
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  20.  20
    Rejoinder to Kris McDaniel.Andrew Brenner - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):565-569.
    I would like to thank Kris McDaniel for his reply. In my original response to McDaniel I say that, given his interpretation of the distinction between conventional and ultimate truth, we would no longer be able to employ certain powerful arguments in favor of the thesis that persons are merely conventionally existent, and it would turn out that the thesis that persons are merely conventionally existent doesn't have some of the important implications that proponents of that thesis generally take it (...)
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  21.  46
    Ontological Pluralism, Abhidharma Metaphysics, and the Two Truths: A Response to Kris McDaniel.Andrew Brenner - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):543-557.
    Kris McDaniel has recently proposed an interpretation of the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth, as that distinction is made within Abhidharma metaphysics. According to McDaniel's proposal, the distinction between conventional truth and ultimate truth is closely connected with a similar distinction between conventional existence and ultimate existence. What is more, the distinction between conventional existence and ultimate existence should be interpreted along ontological pluralist lines: the difference between things that ultimately exist and things that merely conventionally exist amounts (...)
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  22.  5
    Cultivating a Good Life in Early Chinese and Ancient Greek Philosophy: Perspectives and Reverberations Ed. By Karyn Lai, Rick Benitez and Hyun Jin Kim.Paul Carelli - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):1-3.
    This volume presents fifteen articles that were the eventual result of a conference on ancient Chinese and Greek views of cultivation held in January of 2016 at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. The articles are evenly distributed into three sections: the first dedicated to understanding the way cultivation is conceptualized, the second to investigating epistemological problems concerning cultivation, and the third to considering practical applications. There is a brief but informative introduction to the volume as a (...)
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  23.  4
    On Ascertaining the Stuff of Dreams: Nāgārjuna's Madhyamaka and Taktsang Lotsawa's Interpretation.Thomas H. Doctor - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):285-302.
    As a Madhyamaka philosopher, Taktsang Lotsawa Sherab Rinchen 1 is perhaps most widely known for his claim to have identified eighteen major contradictions in the thought of Tsongkhapa Losang Drakpa, a polemic discussion that appears in the Madhyamaka chapter of his encyclopedic Freedom from Extremes through Comprehensive Knowledge of Philosophy.2 In this article we will not pursue this critique, both renowned and infamous, but instead focus on Taktsang Lotsawa's own pragmatic hermeneutics of emptiness in context. Taktsang Lotsawa argues that *Svātantrika (...)
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  24.  5
    Buddhist No-Self, the Person Convention, and the Metaphysics of Moral Practice: Is Hayashi's Emergentist Account of Vasubandhu's Ontology of Persons Explanatorily Self-Defeating?Michael Joseph Fletcher - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):303-337.
    Post-millennial scholarship in Buddhist studies reflects increasing interest from Anglophone philosophers working within the analytic tradition.1 Within this emerging body of work the aim has been not merely to bring the conceptual toolkit of analytic philosophers to bear on topics traditionally of interest to Buddhist philosophers but also to enlist the theories that analytic philosophers have developed on core topics within epistemology and metaphysics as frameworks within which to interpret the work of major Buddhist philosophers. Two recent notable examples of (...)
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  25.  7
    Thinking Beyond Thought: Tsongkhapa and Mipham on the Conceptualized Ultimate.Jay L. Garfield - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):338-353.
    In Tibetan discussions of the two truths—and in particular in Geluk discussions, inflected as they are by both Dharmakīrti's and Candrakīrti's epistemologies, which, however different they are, agree on the necessity of epistemic warrant for genuine knowledge, and on the appropriateness of particular epistemic warrants or instruments to their respective objects of knowledge—the nature of our knowledge of the ultimate truth leads to interesting epistemological and ontological problems. Given that the ultimate truth must be a possible object of knowledge, there (...)
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  26.  8
    Genius as an Innate Mental Talent of Idea-Giving in Chinese Painting and Kant.Xiaoyan Hu - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):354-373.
    According to the Song critic Guo Ruoxu, the last five laws by Xie He are "open to study," while qiyun 氣韻 "necessarily involves an innate knowledge; it assuredly cannot be secured through cleverness or close application, nor will time aid its attainment. It is an unspoken accord, a spiritual communion; 'something that happens without one's knowing how'".1 For Guo Ruoxu, although the qiyun within a work refers to the quality of a painting and cannot be identical with the qiyun of (...)
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  27.  5
    Confucian Justifications of Democracy: A Critique of Joseph Chan's Democratic Theory.Yutang Jin - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):374-394.
    For many contemporary Confucians today, an urgent task is to reflect on the challenges of modernity and look for what Mou Zongsan calls a "New Outer Kinghood."1 In the political realm, this task implies identifying ways in which Confucianism can meet the challenges of, and potentially reconcile itself with, liberal and democratic values. One of the most contested terrains that emerged out of the recent debate is the relationship between Confucianism and democracy. Theorists not only differ in their understandings of (...)
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  28.  3
    Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea and Japan by Philip J. Ivanhoe.Leah Kalmanson - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):1-4.
    Despite the breadth of material covered, Philip J. Ivanhoe's Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan traces a central narrative: the reception of and eventual reaction against Song-dynasty Confucianism throughout East Asia. The reception of these discourses speaks to the far-reaching influence of Song-dynasty Confucian philosophy, especially the so-called Cheng-Zhu school associated with the work of Zhu Xi. The reaction against them speaks to a turn against Song-era metaphysical speculation and towards fidelity (...)
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  29.  6
    Metaphor or Delusion? A Mīmāṃsaka's Response to Conceptual Metaphor Theory.Malcolm Keating - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):395-423.
    Conceptual Metaphor Theory, an approach to human thought and language that began with the work of Lakoff and Johnson, claims that metaphor is not merely a linguistic phenomenon, but is implicated in structuring human thought. On this view, that people use words like "attack" and "defend" to describe argumentative moves demonstrates that they think of argument as a kind of war. This is opposed to the view that some words like "attack" are polysemous, sometimes meaning to engage in physical warfare (...)
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  30. The Pope and the Yellow Emperor: The Interconnected Body.Andrew Koh - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):424-446.
    The Society of Jesus has had a long relationship with China, beginning with the failed attempt by Francis Xavier to enter the country through to the achievements of Matteo Ricci, his companions, and successors. The missionaries introduced European science, including medicine, with which they engaged both the imperial court and the commoners. The eventual expulsion of the Jesuits and formal reconnection with China via the current papacy gives a poignancy to the consideration of medicine and environmental concerns. Pope Francis is (...)
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  31.  7
    Readings of Sāntideva's Guide to Bodhisattva Practice Ed. By Jonathan C. Gold and Douglas S. Duckworth.Amod Lele - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):1-4.
    Śāntideva's Bodhicaryāvatāra is an extraordinary text. Its ethical arguments, with their metaphysical grounding, are among the most explicit in classical Indian literature. This fact alone is sufficient to place the BCA among the most important texts of classical Indian philosophy. But the BCA's importance goes well beyond philosophy as such, as the Readings volume reviewed here shows amply: it is a work of poetic and literary brilliance with ritual and meditative significance in Tibet and elsewhere. (There is nothing wrong with (...)
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  32.  7
    A Reply to Andrew Brenner.Kris McDaniel - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):557-565.
    In "Abhidharma Metaphysics and the Two Truths", I argued that a version of ontological pluralism—the view that there are different modes of being—is a philosophically satisfactory account of the doctrine of two truths as found in Abhidharma metaphysics, and that it is superior to accounts in the secondary literature.1 According to my account, the doctrine of two truths is best construed as a view that distinguishes between conventional and ultimate reality, the former of which is enjoyed by persons while the (...)
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  33.  3
    The Sage and the Saint: The Legend and the Legacy of Giulio Aleni.Dawei Pan - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):447-468.
    If reaching out to others is often difficult and needing both kindness and skill, it is a tremendous achievement not only to succeed in the endeavor but to win the love and respect of others as well. This was the case with Giulio Aleni. One of the most respected missionaries since Matteo Ricci and Ricci's successor in the Chinese Jesuit Province, the Italian-born Father was referred to by his followers as the "Confucius from the West" : Ai Rulue, whose other (...)
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  34.  6
    Gerald James Larson, 1938–2019.Joseph Prabhu - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):261-264.
    The community of scholars in Asian and Comparative Philosophy recently lost one of its leading lights. Gerald James Larson, known more widely as Gerry Larson, passed away suddenly on April 27, 2019 at the age of 81. His death was unexpected because he was just getting ready to leave for India in connection with a meeting centered on his recently published magnum opus Classical Yoga Philosophy and the Legacy of Sāṁkhya. Sadly, he experienced some sharp abdominal pain and passed away (...)
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  35.  3
    How Much Adhikāra Does a Commentator Have to Interpret a Śāstra Text.Trichur Rukmani - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):469-484.
    This article examines the question of the freedom that a commentator has while commenting on a philosophical sūtra text. The texts covered are Gautama's Nyāyasūtras, Is'varakṛṣṣa's Sāṁkhyakārikā, and Patañjali's Yogasūtras.It is well known that every commentator believes that s/he is the one who has understood the true intention of the original author and therefore employs some interpretative tools to bring out the meaning of the text s/he is commenting on. Generally there are three devices that are commonly employed. One is (...)
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  36.  3
    Japanese Environmental Philosophy Ed. By Baird Callicott and James McRae.Lucy Schultz - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):1-6.
    Japanese Environmental Philosophy is the latest contribution to an ever-growing discourse on non-Western and comparative approaches to nature and the environment spurred in no small part by the renowned environmental ethicist, J. Baird Callicott. This volume is the second book edited by Callicott and James McRae, the first being Environmental Philosophy in Asian Traditions of Thought. The latter is considered a sequel to Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought, edited by Callicott and Roger T. Ames, first published in 1989. As (...)
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  37.  1
    As If One Witnessed the Creation: Rethinking the Aesthetic Appreciation of Chinese Calligraphy.Xiongbo Shi - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):485-505.
    This article examines several aspects of the appreciation of Chinese calligraphy, seeking to address two questions. First, what are the aesthetic objects in its appreciation? And second, how can we characterize the process of coming to understand calligraphic works? The answers, I contend, can be found in classical texts on this art. I hold that the aesthetic objects in the experience of a calligraphic work are twofold: the outer form and the inner qualities. This is analogous to what Noël Carroll (...)
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  38.  3
    Revisiting the Internal-External Issue of Ren and Yi: In and Beyond Mengzi 6A:4.Qingjuan Sun - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):506-521.
    The internal-external issue of ren 仁 and yi 義 concerning whether ren and yi are internal or external is traceable to the Warring States period. One of the most famous recorded debates happened between Gaozi and Mengzi in Mengzi 6A:4. In the existing literature it is generally believed that Gaozi holds that ren is "nei" 內 and yi is "wai" 外, whereas Mengzi contends that both ren and yi are "nei."1 However, this assertion has two problems that I aim to (...)
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  39.  2
    Chinese Thing-Metaphor: Translating Material Qualities to Spiritual Ideals.Tsaiyi Wu - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):522-542.
    The highest good is like that of water. The goodness of water is that it benefits the ten thousand creatures; yet itself does not scramble, but is content with the places that all men disdain. It is this that makes water so near the Way [the dao].In the field of comparative literature, one of the most important topics of study has been how Eastern and Western traditions organize differently the relationship between humans and things, as articulated in metaphysics and as (...)
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  40.  6
    Spiritual Discipline, Emotions, and Behavior During the Song Dynasty: Zhu Xi's and Qisong's Commentaries on the Zhongyong in Comparative Perspective.Diana Arghirescu - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):1-26.
    The present study subscribes to efforts undertaken by recent scholarship that focus on bringing out the connections between Song Neo-Confucian and Chan thoughts and practices. It proposes a new exploratory approach in the realm of philosophical ethics, namely a comparative hermeneutics of two Song-dynasty commentaries on the Confucian classic the Zhongyong. This study also puts forward a new Song-dynasty perspective on this text, a point of view common to both the Neo-Confucian and Chan schools, as I will demonstrate, which focuses (...)
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  41.  4
    Eckhartian Neologisms and the Tathātā Framework: Istic/Isticheit in Conversation with The Awakening of Faith.John Becker - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):27-41.
    The purpose of this article is to reexamine the concept of suchness, as discussed in The Awakening of Faith in the Mahāyāna, in conversation with Meister Eckhart’s neologisms istic/isticheit. Previous comparative Buddhist-Eckhart studies have typically rendered these neologisms in a strict Aristotelian ontological sense, with English renderings being formulated as the “is-ness” or the “being-ness” of God. These earlier interpretations concerning Eckhart’s thought were prevalent in the mid-twentieth century and put forward by the influential Kyoto School. A 2003 article by (...)
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  42.  7
    Dōgen's "Leaving Home Life" : A Study of Aesthetic Experience and Growth in John Dewey and Dōgen.Jacob Bender - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):42-62.
    This study argues that Dōgen’s “Leaving Home Life” fascicle is not simply about leaving home/lay life to become a practicing monk. At first glance, the fascicle might not appear philosophically significant. To help bring the themes of that work into greater focus, I juxtapose Dōgen’s Shōbōgenzō and John Dewey’s later works on aesthetic experience and education. Both the teachings of Dōgen and the later Deweyan works on aesthetic experience are similar in the sense that both describe nature as a radically (...)
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  43.  4
    The Nondualistic Aesthetics of Qi 氣 in Antoni Tàpies' Holistic Conception of Art.Mei-Hsin Chen - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):84-115.
    Antoni Tàpies’ essays and interviews display how his conception of art is impregnated with an Oriental nondualistic aesthetics.1 I argue that, among them, the Chinese aesthetics of qi 氣 plays the most pivotal role and leaves an indelible imprint in his corpus. Tàpies’ encounter with this Asian thinking probably came through the translated writings of Laozi 老子, Confucius 孔子, Mencius 孟子, Zhuangzi 莊子, Mozi 墨子, and Lin Yutang 林語堂, among others, thanks to the publications of different Western-based Sinologists.2 However, instead (...)
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  44.  6
    The Exclusion of Chinese Philosophy: "Ten Don'ts," "Three Represents," and "Eight Musts".Carine Defoort - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):214-225.
    The legitimacy of Chinese philosophy is a thorny topic that has returned in waves during the last decades. The high tides were 2003 and 2016.1 While the topic can and has been discussed from a wide variety of points of view, most debates focus on the Chinese side: either on the nature and quality of early Chinese master texts or on current research at Chinese philosophy departments. Such reflections are important and deserve to be continued. However, one side of the (...)
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  45.  2
    Is Free Will Confucian? Li Zehou's Confucian Revision of the Kantian Will.Robert A. Carleo Iii - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):63-83.
    In recent decades a small wave of scholars has argued that classical Confucian moral teachings are characterized by the lack of a concept of free will. Li Zehou, in contrast, places free will at the center of his reading of classical Confucian ethics. Is this too interpretive? Does it do violence to the concept of free will, or to classical Confucian morality? Could it even be un-Confucian?Li Zehou puts forth his systematic ethics as part of “a world philosophy that incorporates (...)
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  46.  28
    Wu-Wei, Merleau-Ponty, And Being Aware of What We Do.Marcus Lee - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):116-135.
    In classical Chinese philosophy, the best kind of life is a life lived in line with the Dao (the “Way”). A core feature of this kind of life is attaining the ideal of wu-wei. In early Daoist writings, wu-wei denotes an ideal way of acting. However, since wu-wei is normally translated as “no-action” these ancient texts give us a picture of the best kind of life that may appear paradoxical to many philosophers. In this paper, I suggest a way to (...)
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  47.  10
    Sarvamukti: Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan's Aporetic Metaphysics of Collective Salvation.Ayon Maharaj - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):136-154.
    Classical and modern figures in numerous religious traditions—including Judaism, Christianity, Sufism, Hinduism, Mahāyāna Buddhism, and the Baha’i faith—have championed the doctrine of universal salvation, the view that everyone without exception will be saved.1 However, recent scholarly work on the topic has made clear that universal salvation is not a monolithic concept. Rather, the doctrine of universal salvation takes a wide variety of forms, depending on the broader theological or metaphysical framework within which it is embedded.Within Hinduism, for instance, figures as (...)
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  48.  1
    A Few Thoughts on the Possibility of Intercultural Thinking in a Global Age.Kai Marchal - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):238-246.
    Until recently, most humanities scholars in North America and Europe lived in a world where China was notable for its absence. In the great debates of the 1990s and early 2000s on postmodernism, the end of history, the legacy of Marxism, and the future of liberalism, no Chinese contributions were heard, nor were they in the more recent debates on the relationship between Islam and the West, the post-secular age, genetic engineering, the digital age, or Speculative Realism. Only most recently, (...)
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  49.  19
    The King's Slaughterer—or, The Royal Way of Nourishing Life.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):155-173.
    The story of “Cook Ding” —who actually acts not so much as a cook, but as a butcher at a ruler’s court—has gained almost iconic status as, one might say, the mother of all knack stories in the Zhuangzi 莊子. It has become one of the most widely known narratives of the text, both in and outside the Chinese cultural world, and in both past and contemporary times. The story, and its protagonist, have thereby come to represent a standard conception (...)
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  50.  5
    Intercultural Philosophy and Intercultural Hermeneutics: A Response to Defoort, Wenning, and Marchal.Eric S. Nelson - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):247-259.
    Carine Defoort, Mario Wenning, and Kai Marchal offer three ways of engaging with Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought and the philosophical, hermeneutical, and historical issues it attempted to articulate and address.1 This work is historical with a contemporary philosophical intent: to reexamine a tumultuous contested epoch of philosophy’s past in order to reconsider its existing limitations and alternative possibilities. One dimension of this book is the investigation of constellations and entanglements of historical forces and concepts for (...)
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  51.  2
    Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida by John C. Maraldo.Bradley Park - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):1-3.
    Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida, by John C. Maraldo, is the first of three volumes collecting his essays in Japanese philosophy. This volume, which is divided into two sections, gathers together thirteen essays reflecting on the thought of Nishida Kitarō. The first section, “Pathways to Nishida,” is comprised of three essays clarifying some of the metatheoretical, intellectual and scholarly contexts around the study of Nishida’s thought. The remaining essays represent “Pathways Through Nishida,” which engage Nishida’s (...)
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  52.  8
    Freedom of the Mind: Buddhist Soft Compatibilism.Rick Repetti - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):174-195.
    In this essay, I argue that an analysis of the mind-control skills exhibited by Buddhist meditation experts may be used to formulate a theory of mental freedom, Buddhist Soft Compatibilism, that includes not only freedom of the will but the freedoms of emotion, attention, perception, the self, and all voluntary phenomena. BSC is compatible with determinism, indeterminism, the various Buddhist conceptions of causation, and the Buddhist conception of the self.The structure of my essay is as follows. First, I review the (...)
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  53.  7
    The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State by Elizabeth C. Economy.Martin Schönfeld - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):1-3.
    The Third Revolution is an examination of the historic transformations in contemporary China. Elizabeth C. Economy is director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. According to its mission statement, the CFR is a think tank “dedicated to being a resource for … government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students … to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States.” The Third Revolution is about the societal, economic, and political changes (...)
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  54.  1
    Shen Gua's Empiricism by Ya ZUO.James D. Sellmann - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):1-5.
    History of science students will want to read this book. Professor Zuo animates the life, career, and thought of SHEN Gua in this delightful historical, biographical work. SHEN Gua embodied the classical spirit of the scholar-official during the Song dynasty. Shen is the author of Brush Talks from Dream Brook, a canonical text in the study of the history of science in China and in the Notebook style of writing. Zuo argues, using a double-narrative structure, that Shen’s intellectual life and (...)
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  55.  3
    Intercultural Encounter in the Age of Hybridity: A Response to Eric S. Nelson.Mario Wenning - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):225-237.
    In an age when the geopolitical dynamics are shifting from the Atlantic to the Pacific, the reception of Asian sources in Europe could be seen as primarily of historical interest. At first sight, the interpretation of Chinese and Buddhist wisdom traditions in early twentieth-century Germany appears to bear little significance for contemporary concerns. In Chinese and Buddhist Philosophy in Early Twentieth-Century German Thought, Eric Nelson proves this assumption wrong and demonstrates that the short-lived cosmopolitan glimmers in between the two world (...)
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  56.  4
    Virtue as Desire: Mengzi 6A In Light of the Kongzi Shilun.Boqun Zhou - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (1):196-213.
    In this article, I will use a looted bamboo manuscript to reconsider a group of analogies in Mengzi 6A between virtue and desire.1 The manuscript, titled Kongzi shilun 孔子詩論, contains fragments of a Warring States interpretation of “Guanju” 關雎 among other poems in the Shijing 詩經.2 Ever since Confucius commented on the poem in the Analects, it has fascinated generations of Confucian philosophers who try to see beyond its literary meaning for some deeper truth concerning humanity. As can be expected, (...)
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  57.  33
    A Chariot Between Two Armies: A Perfectionist Reading of the Bhagavadgītā.Paul Deb - 2020 - Philosophy East and West.
    Interpretations of the ethical significance of the Bhagavadgītā typically understand the debate between Arjuna and Kṛṣṇa in terms of a struggle between consequentialist and deontological doctrines. In this paper, I provide instead a reading of the Gītā which draws on a conception of moral thinking that can be understood to cut across those positions – that developed by Stanley Cavell, which he calls ‘Emersonian Moral Perfectionism’. In so doing, I emphasise how Kṛṣṇa’s consolation of Arjuna can centrally and fruitfully be (...)
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