Year:

  1. Al-Ghazālī's Moderation in Belief: Al-Iqtiṣād Fī Al-I'tiqād Tran. By Aladdin M. Yaqub.Recep Alpyağil - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):933-934.
    It is quite common to refer to al-Ghazālī as one of the most important thinkers in the Islamic intellectual tradition. Aladdin M. Yaqub’s Al-Ghazālī’s Moderation in Belief: al-Iqtiṣād fī al-i’tiqād shows that this remark is not hyperbolic. And this volume has many characteristics of a good translation of classical texts. First of all, Aladdin M. Yaqub is very consistent with his use of terminology. He explains his preferences for Arabic philosophical terms in “Note on the Translation”. As is well known, (...)
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  2. Ethics and Politics in Classical Confucian Thought: A Response to David Elstein.Amine Loubna El - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):919-920.
    In his review of my book, Classical Confucian Political Thought, David Elstein argues that my interpretation of Classical Confucian political thought draws too sharp a distinction between Confucians’ ethical standards and their political standards, thus veering perhaps a bit too far from the “conventional wisdom” that views Confucian politics as an extension of Confucian ethics. As I write in the book, “To the extent that the political standard is a normative standard, it is difficult to insist that it has nothing (...)
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  3. John Dewey and East-West Philosophy.Jim Behuniak - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):908-916.
    The first two East-West Philosophers’ Conferences at the University of Hawai‘i constitute an important chapter in the history of comparative philosophy. Wing-tsit Chan recalls the first meeting in 1939 as a “very small beginning,” one that served primarily as the impetus for F.S.C. Northrop’s thesis that East and West represented two contrasting styles of thought. As Chan remembers, “we saw the world as two halves, East and West,” and in his subsequent 1946 work, The Meeting of East and West, Northrop (...)
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  4. The Strong Case for Vegetarianism in Pātañjala Yoga.Jonathan Dickstein - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):613-628.
    In a recent interview, yoga historian David Gordon White commented on the precarious commitment that modern yoga has to so-called Classical Yoga. The predicament stems from a disjuncture between the contents of the Yogasūtra and the practices and concepts commonly taught in many yoga centers and trainings. The latter teachings resonate stronger with alternative traditions, specifically those illustrated in haṭha yoga and Vedānta sources and within their related living communities.1 As White concluded regarding this peculiar and ubiquitous selection of the (...)
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  5. Classical Confucian Political Thought: A New Interpretation, by Loubna El Amine.Elstein David - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):917-919.
    Confucian political philosophy is enjoying a renaissance. In the last two decades a number of significant monographs in English have appeared, to say nothing of the Chinese studies that are virtually beyond count. If they have a common theme, it is that Confucian politics is an extension of its ethical thought. Confucian politics is not a mere application of techniques for producing order, as in Legalism, nor does it separate politics and personal morality, as in liberalism. Considering a wide array (...)
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  6. A Reply to Professor El Amine.Elstein David - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):920-921.
    After reading Professor El Amine’s response to my review of her Classical Confucian Political Thought, I realize we are not as far apart on many issues as it appeared. Nevertheless, some areas of substantive disagreement remain. I will take the opportunity to highlight a couple of these. One is whether the good qualities expected of the common people should be properly considered virtues, that is, whether they are different in kind from the virtues that mark a superior man or even (...)
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  7. Heidegger and Mullā Ṣadrā on the Meaning of Metaphysics.Muhammad U. Faruque - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):629-650.
    The aim of the present study is to analyze the general outlook of Heidegger and Mullā Ṣadrā with regard to the meaning of metaphysics, occupying as it does a central position in their respective philosophies. It should first be made clear that “metaphysics” refers to First Philosophy or the scientia divina in the philosophical system of Ṣadrā.1 The English word “metaphysics” can be traced back to its etymological source in the Greek plural noun-phrase ta meta ta phusika, which became metaphysica (...)
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  8. The Prescriptive Dialectics of Li 禮 and Yi 義 in the Lienü Zhuan 列女傳.César Guarde-Paz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):651-666.
    To articulate the past historically does not mean to recognize it “the way it really was”. It means to seize hold of a memory as it flashes up at a moment of danger. Ever since the advent of the May Fourth Movement in 1919, which marked a turning point in the process of intellectual modernization in the Republic of China, voices were raised against Confucian mores because they were considered cannibalistic, and against the influence they exerted upon the freedom and (...)
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  9. One Child: Do We Have a Right to Have More? By Sarah Conly.Hedberg Trevor - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):934-938.
    It is no secret that Earth is on the brink of an environmental crisis. At this point in the twenty-first century, we are familiar with the problems: climate change, biodiversity loss, and generally unsustainable patterns of consumption. Yet explicit discussion of how the rising human population contributes to these environmental problems or whether we morally ought to do something to curb population growth is relatively rare, despite the significance of these problems and the crucial role that population growth plays in (...)
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  10. Sūkṣma and the Clear and Distinct Light: The Path to Epistemic Enhancement in Yogic and Cartesian Meditation.Gary Jaeger - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):667-692.
    Yoga, like the other five orthodox schools or darśanas of Hindu philosophy, is primarily soteriological in purpose; it offers the hope of salvation from the inevitable suffering of life and the cycle of death and rebirth more broadly. Unlike the other darśanas, its prescribed method for achieving this salvation is meditation, by which the practitioner focuses his or her attention so as to become undisturbed by the fluctuations of his or her own consciousness caused by stimuli in the external world (...)
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  11.  2
    Acting-Intuition and the Achievement of Perception: Merleau-Ponty with Nishida.David W. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):693-709.
    In the opening pages of the preface to Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty characterizes phenomenology as a style of thinking whose “efforts are concentrated upon re-achieving a direct and primitive contact with the world, and endowing that contact with philosophical status” by describing things exactly as they present themselves, offering an account of the world as we live it prior to the second-order expression found in cultural constructions such as science.1 Like other thinkers in the phenomenological tradition, Merleau-Ponty discovers in the (...)
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  12. Philosophy East/West: Exploring Intersections Between Educational and Contemplative Practices Ed. By Oren Ergas and Sharon Todd.Patrick Laude - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):938-940.
    Oren Ergas and Sharon Todd, the editors of Philosophy East/West: Exploring Intersections between Educational and Contemplative Practices, articulate the two main concerns of their project in the introduction. The first intent is to embrace a cross-philosophical approach that may integrate a wide spectrum of wisdom traditions the world over in order to maximize fruitful dialogue and cross-fertilization. The second is to take stock of the recent “contemplative turn” in education, as illustrated primarily by the growing contemporary trend to emphasize meditational (...)
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  13. The Philosophy of Living by François Jullien, And: This Strange Idea of the Beautiful by François Jullien.Oliver Leaman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):940-942.
    It is appropriate to deal with The Philosophy of Living and This Strange Idea of the Beautiful together since they both embody the methodology of François Jullien that is to be found in many of his books. The European Continental tradition in philosophy on a particular topic is outlined and then contrasted unfavorably with Chinese philosophy on the same topic, although it has to be said immediately that by “Chinese philosophy” the author means those parts of it that he selects. (...)
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  14.  1
    Merleau-Ponty and Nishida: "Interexpression" As Motor-Perceptual Faith.Loughnane Adam - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):710-737.
    Both Nishida Kitarō and Maurice Merleau-Ponty wrote extensively about artistic expression in their early works, yet in the last period of their careers that consideration is put mostly aside as they engage more directly with abstract ontological concerns. As this happens, a curiously overlooked concept becomes prominent in their writings, namely “faith.” While Merleau-Ponty’s is a “perceptual faith”, and Nishida’s is, broadly speaking, a religious faith, neither is strictly secular nor spiritual, yet both entail a remarkably similar ontology of the (...)
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  15. Schopenhauer's Compass: An Introduction to Schopenhauer's Philosophy and Its Origins by Urs App. [REVIEW]Ayon Maharaj - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):942-948.
    In the past several decades of scholarship on Arthur Schopenhauer, a cottage industry has emerged that investigates the relationship between Schopenhauer and Indian thought. Studies on Schopenhauer and Indian thought usually fall into one of three categories: comparative studies of Schopenhauer’s views and Indian philosophies such as Advaita Vedānta and Buddhism,1 studies on Schopenhauer’s reception of Indian thought,2 and studies examining the extent to which Indian sources might have influenced the development of Schopenhauer’s philosophical views.3 As early as 1816, Schopenhauer (...)
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  16.  2
    The Dao That Cannot Be Named.Richard McDonough - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):738-762.
    To produce a history entirely from speculations alone seems no better than to sketch a romance.... Yet, what may not be [known about actual history], can, nonetheless, be attempted through speculation regarding their first beginnings, as far as these are made by nature. The first stanza of the Dao-de Jing, one of the most memorable passages in world literature, is not a paradigm of clarity. Alan Chan distinguishes six sorts of approaches to interpreting the Dao-de Jing : mythological, mystical, religious, (...)
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  17.  84
    A Taxonomy of Views About Time in Buddhist and Western Philosophy.Kristie Miller - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):763-782.
    We find the claim that time is not real in both western and eastern philosophical traditions. In what follows I will call the view that time does not exist temporal error theory. Temporal error theory was made famous in western analytic philosophy in the early 1900s by John McTaggart (1908) and, in much the same tradition, temporal error theory was subsequently defended by Gödel (1949). The idea that time is not real, however, stretches back much further than that. It is (...)
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  18.  2
    Hundun's Mistake: Satire and Sanity in the Zhuangzi.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):783-800.
    The narrative of the Death of Emperor Hundun 混沌, who finally perishes from the seventh hole that his two fellow Emperors have drilled into his formless body to do him the favor of supplying him with a face, famously concludes the seven Inner Chapters of the Zhuangzi 莊子.1 Perhaps the sudden demise of the story’s protagonist is meant to signal paradoxically to the reader that he or she, too, has, unwittingly, now come to an end and reached a stage of (...)
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  19.  1
    The Philosophical Challenge From China Ed. By Brian Bruya.Sydney Morrow - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):948-951.
    The Philosophical Challenge from China, edited by Brian Bruya, undoubtedly occupies an important place in the discourse about what practices and authorities are relevant to Philosophy as an academic discipline. Its confident reorientation of philosophical relevance in the context of Anglophone academics will hopefully speak meaningfully to any remaining skeptics of the usefulness of Chinese philosophy. The intended audience of this effort, however, is shrinking, or, more accurately, those willing to be convinced are increasingly few, and what remains is simply (...)
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  20.  1
    One and the Possibility of Many in Greek and Indian Philosophy: Plotinus and Rāmānuja.Daniel Regnier - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):825-840.
    Philosophers often devote their most painstaking work to distinguishing their own thought from that of philosophers with whom they, in fact, share a great affinity. One of the foremost challenges to Platonic thought has been to qualify its assertion that the One, although beyond being, is the ultimate principle of reality. For to assert the primacy of the One in certain philosophical contexts might seem to exclude the reality of multiplicity. Yet Platonic thought does not hold that multiplicity is simply (...)
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  21. Structural Relations and Analogies in Classical Chinese Logic.Jana S. Rošker - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):841-863.
    The present article aims to expose some aspects of the specific features of classical Chinese analogisms. First, it exposes the supposition that this type of analogism did not focus exclusively on forms without considering their content, that is, that it was linguistically and semantically determined. Second, it also aims to show that classical Chinese analogies are based on structural relations between the objects in question, which constitute the similarity of two types of things that share certain attributes. This article additionally (...)
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  22. Polyvalent Philosophy and Soteriology in Early Buddhism.Eviatar Shulman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):864-886.
    The ideas of a “Buddha” or of his “enlightenment” suggest a certain unity and coherence. In accord with the positivist and metaphysical realist attitudes of our times, many assume that a Buddha is defined by his awakening, which is conceived of as a definitive, clear-cut event with specific characteristics. Enlightenment is a “thing,” a recognizable state of mind or change of consciousness, or perhaps a similar kind of process, which may be beyond the grasp of words, but is nevertheless confidently (...)
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  23. Relational Self in Classical Confucianism: Lessons From Confucius' Analects.O. Thompson Kirill - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):887-907.
    One’s translating, reading, and understanding of texts from other eras and traditions are conditioned by tacit assumptions built into one’s own vocabulary and psycho-cultural understanding of self—of which one tends to be only intuitively aware. Thus, for example, when encountering the vocabulary in Classical Chinese for “I,” “me,” “mine,” “self,” et cetera, modern readers are inclined to import their own linguistic, cognitive, and cultural intuitions about these terms, unconsciously and without second thought. This has been particularly problematic for modern Western (...)
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  24.  5
    Philosophy: The Next Step.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):922-932.
    Comparative Philosophy without Borders, edited by Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber is an outstanding and groundbreaking anthology that is also a prolegomena to all future philosophy, not just comparative philosophy. The anthology sets forward an agenda that is arguably the next step for philosophy. Chakrabarti and Weber have a dream : Our dream is that future fusion philosophy will shed its local epithets, even the epithet “comparative.” All good philosophy should be unapologetically, and, eventually, unself-consciously, comparative and culturally hybrid....
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  25. Philosophizing and Power: East–West Encounter in the Formation of Modern East Asian Buddhist Philosophy.Jin Y. Park - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):801-824.
    Philosophy claims that its goal is to search for truth. The history of philosophy, however, demonstrates that this search for truth has not been free from the power dynamics of respective eras. In this article, I claim that the formation of modern East Asian philosophy is one occasion in which the power structure of the time was visibly reflected. The East–West power imbalance at the beginning of the modern period was both implicitly and explicitly imbedded in the formation of modern (...)
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  26. Zhijue as Appreciation and Realization in Zhu Xi: An Examination Through Hun and Po.Eiho Baba - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):301-317.
    In his commentary on the Mencius 6A : 15 passage "the organ of the heartmind is thinking," Zhu Xi writes: "The heart-mind is capable of thinking and this thinking is its functional role ".1 The heart-mind is also said to "possess a multitude of li and respond to ten-thousand events ". Zhu Xi regularly associates this heart-mind as "thinking" that "responds to ten-thousand events" with a special process he refers to as "zhijue" 知覺. For instance, he explains that "the heart-mind (...)
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  27.  3
    Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family, and Religion by Henry Rosemont Jr.Daniel A. Bell - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):565-568.
    Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family, and Religion by Henry Rosemont Jr. is an important challenge to the dominant individualistic ethos of our age. It is not merely a critique of the idea of the rights-claiming, free and autonomous individual: Rosemont also puts forward a strong defense of an alternative idea of the relational person as role-bearing, interrelated, and necessarily responsible to other persons. I am generally sympathetic to Rosemont's view, but I think he (...)
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  28.  6
    The Self, Agency, and Responsibility: A Reply to Mark Siderits.Benovsky Jiri - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):558-564.
    Mark Siderits has raised a number of interesting issues and objections concerning the "pluralist view" of the self I put forward in "Buddhist Philosophy and the No-Self View." In this short reply, I am going to focus on two main points he made, in the reverse order in which he made them.Here is a "metaphysical difficulty" that Siderits raises in the case of the pluralist view. It is useful to formulate the case from the first-person point of view, so let's (...)
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  29.  18
    Buddhist Philosophy and the No-Self View.Jiri Benovsky - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):545-553.
    A widespread interpretation of Buddhist thought concerning the self makes a prominent place for the claim that there is no self. The idea is that this piece of Buddhist philosophy is best understood as being an eliminativist view about the self, sometimes called the "no-self view" or "non-self view". This claim is motivated, in Buddhist philosophy, by the idea that if there were a self, it would have to be a permanent entity that would be a "bearer" of individual psychological (...)
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  30.  3
    The Self-Chariots of Liberation: Plato's Phaedrus, the Upaniṣads, and the Mahābhārata in Search of Eternal Being.Nina Budziszewska - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):318-351.
    The ancient philosophies, both Eastern and Western, expound a way of liberation from the fleeting and sensual world of ever-changing experience and toward the reality of true being, free from death and untruth. For this soteriological purpose, the perfect conception of self-control is offered as the perfect means of liberation. The connection between the two realms of the empirical world and the reality of true being is fixed in a human being, which is viewed as a complex corporeal, mental, and (...)
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  31. Confucianism as Religion: Controversies and Consequences by Yong Chen.Clemens Büttner - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):569-571.
    In Confucianism as Religion: Controversies and Consequences, Yong Chen takes an interesting approach to the subject of Confucian religiosity: he concentrates on analyzing the intellectual and academic debate about the question of whether Confucianism is a religion and highlights its cultural as well as socio-political implications for contemporary China, assuming that this debate coincided with a transition from the predominance of Confucian paradigms to those of modernity. Without this paradigmatic shift, argues Chen, the past and ongoing controversy about Confucian religiosity (...)
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  32.  2
    The Metaphysics and Unnamability of the Dao in the Daodejing and Wittgenstein.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):352-379.
    This essay is basically exegetical in nature, and its purpose is fourfold. First, I argue against the prevailing view that the dao 道 of the Daodejing 道德經 is metaphysically either a non-being or something transcending all senses by showing that it is a nonempty transforming unsummed totality.1 Dao is still metaphysical, but only as something that defies our ability to experience it as a totality or as any of its aspectual totalities.Second, I argue that in the Daodejing Laozi 老子 adopts (...)
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  33. Confucian Propriety and Ritual Learning: A Philosophical Interpretation by Geir Sigurðsson.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):571-575.
    In his most recent book, Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family, and Religion, Henry Rosemont defends against those who would call his reading of Confucianism—he sees it as a type of Role Ethics—a misinterpretation. Rosemont contends that Confucian Role Ethics is important for challenging individualism, even if it is somehow unfaithful to pre-Qin texts. He writes that he could "simply re-title" his book "Role Ethics: A Different Approach to Moral Philosophy Based on a Creative (...)
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  34.  2
    Solving for the Triad: Xunzi and Wendell Berry on Sustainable Agriculture as Ethical Practice.Matthew Duperon - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):380-398.
    The classical Confucian thinker Xunzi is often characterized as a hard-nosed realist, and stands out in the early Chinese canon for his uncompromising materialist cosmology. Xunzi sees the actions of Heaven in terms of natural material forces rather than supernatural theistic ones, and this view leads him to reject various forms of supernaturalism. Xunzi's cosmological concept of the Triad formed by Heaven, Earth, and Humans also places humans at the center of the cosmos, and as such makes his stance very (...)
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  35.  2
    Mīmāṃsānyāyasaṅgraha: A Compendium on the Principles of Mīmāṃsā by Mahādeva Vedāntin.Elisa Freschi - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):575-580.
    The Purpose of the Mīmāṃsānyāyasaṅgraha and Its TranslationSome of the criticism frequently seen in book reviews is due to the reviewer's desire to have read something else. Indeed, I do not wish to judge James Benson's Mīmāṃsānyāyasaṅgraha: A Compendium on the Principles of Mīmāṃsā from the standpoint of what I would have written if I had been in his place. And thus, I will start by outlining his work and the goals he had in mind.The central part of this extensive (...)
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  36.  2
    Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy by Jay L. Garfield.P. Hayes Richard - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):580-588.
    For as long as scholars have been presenting Asian thinkers to readers of European languages, efforts have been made to present the presumably less familiar Asian thinkers as having points of commonality with the presumably more familiar European thinkers. In presenting classical Indian Buddhist philosophers to his readers in the 1920s and 1930s, for example, Stcherbatsky portrayed them as anticipating important features of European philosophers. In his study of Madhyamaka, Nāgārjuna and Candrakīrti are depicted as adumbrating the philosophy of Kant (...)
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  37.  3
    Selected Works of D. T. Suzuki, Volume I: Zen Ed. By Richard M. Jaffe, And: Zen Dust: The History of the Koan and Koan Study in Rinzai Zen by Isshū Miura and Ruth Fuller Sasaki. [REVIEW]Heine Steven - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):588-591.
    The two fine books under review represent in different but complementary ways very successful efforts to revise and reprint what can be considered modern "classic" writings on Zen Buddhist thought, with a strong emphasis on the Rinzai sect, that were produced either by an eminent Japanese scholar or an American working in collaboration with a Japanese researcher and were initially circulated in the West through the 1960s. These writings had a remarkably influential impact on the course of Zen studies at (...)
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  38. Just This Is It: Dongshan and the Practice of Suchness by Taigen Dan Leighton.Christopher Ives - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):591-594.
    In Just This Is It: Dongshan and the Practice of Suchness, Taigen Dan Leighton has written a rich introduction to the teachings of Dongshan Liangjie, one of the Chinese founders of the Caodong branch of Chan/Zen Buddhism. Drawing on his expertise as both a scholar and a Zen teacher, Leighton analyzes Dongshan's Recorded Sayings, especially its encounter dialogues, the teaching poem "Jewel Mirror Samādhi," and the doctrine of the five degrees, while also taking up anecdotes about Dongshan that appear in (...)
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  39.  3
    The Ritual Methods of Comparative Philosophy.Leah Kalmanson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):399-418.
    Whoever writes in blood and aphorisms does not want to be read, but rather to be learned by heart.Here's what is necessary: one blow with a club, one scar; one slap on the face, a handful of blood. Your reading of what other people write should be just like this. Don't be lax!In several recent articles, Leigh Kathryn Jenco questions the use of Eurocentric methodologies in conducting cross-cultural research within and about Chinese traditions.3 As she says, "postcolonial and 'non-Western' societies (...)
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  40.  1
    The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary Ed. By Seyyed Hossein Nasr.Oliver Leaman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):594-596.
    The Study Quran: A New Translation and Commentary, almost two thousand pages of translation, commentary, and discussion of the Qur'an, is a very impressive product. It is very unusual also, since it is clearly meant to be a religious work, not a work about religion. And it is a book by believers not only for believers but also for anyone interested in the topic. It has some impressive merits, and the main one to my mind is the extensive use of (...)
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  41. On the Claim "All the People on the Street Are Sages".Li Puqun - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):419-440.
    The famous statement from the Neo-Confucian tradition, "All the people on the street are sages", is commonly believed to have first been made in a short poem by Zhu Xi about the famous Buddhist city of Quanzhou. In the poem, Zhu Xi writes: "This place has been called a Buddhist kingdom; all the people on the street are sages".1 However, the statement is more frequently attributed to another Neo-Confucian philosopher, Wang Yangming, and it is often alleged to be a typical (...)
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  42.  2
    Debating Vivekananda: A Reader Ed. By A. Raghuramaraju.Douglas T. McGetchin - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):596-599.
    The Bengali Swami Vivekananda is probably best known for his years of travels and lecturing as an Indian missionary to the United States and Europe, beginning with his address in 1893 to the World's Parliament of Religions in Chicago. He also founded, in 1897 in Calcutta, the Ramakrishna Mission, a Vedantic religious society named after his guru, an illiterate village priest who, his followers believed, had had ecstatic divine visions. Vivekananda's interests and life reflected important currents in the development of (...)
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  43.  1
    Doubts on Avicenna: A Study and Edition of Sharaf Al-Dīn Al-Mas'ūdī's Commentary on the Ishārāt. By Ayman Shihadeh.McGinnis Jon - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):599-601.
    While the little-known thinker Sharaf al-Dīn al-Mas'ūdī may have had doubts concerning the Ishārāt of the great Persian philosopher Avicenna, no one should have doubts concerning Ayman Shihadeh's brilliant Doubts on Avicenna: A Study and Edition of Sharaf al-Dīn al-Mas'ūdī's Commentary on the Ishārāt. Professor Shihadeh's volume is a rich study of Mas'ūdī's alMabāḥith wa-l-shukūk 'alā Kitāb al-Ishārāt, which additionally offers the first critical edition of that work. Doubts on Avicenna affords the reader a snapshot of the middle period of (...)
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  44.  38
    Values in China as Compared to Africa: Two Conceptions of Harmony.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):441-465.
    Given a 21st century context of sophisticated market economies and other Western influences such as Christianity, what similarities and differences are there between characteristic indigenous values of sub-Saharan Africa and China, and how do they continue to influence everyday life in these societies? Establishing that central to both non-Western, indigenous value systems are ideals of harmonious relationships, I compare and contrast traditional African and Chinese conceptions of harmony and analyze a number of respects in which an appeal to this value (...)
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  45. Ethics in Islam: Friendship in the Political Thought of Al-Tawhīdī and His Contemporaries. By Nuha A. Alshaar.Eric Ormsby - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):602-605.
    Of the many illustrious figures of the Buyid period none is perhaps as intriguing, or as enigmatic, as Abū Hayyān al-Tawhīdī. We know all too little of his biography. He was probably born between 310/922 and 932 but whether in Baghdad, Shiraz, or Nishapur remains uncertain. From his works we know that he studied in Baghdad under such renowned scholars as the jurist and qādī Abū Hāmid al-Marwazī. He tells us that he was in Mecca in 353/964 and, in 366/976, (...)
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  46.  3
    Method Mourning: Xunzi on Ritual Performance.Thomas Radice - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):466-493.
    Xunzi's 荀子 essay, "A Discussion of Rituals" is the earliest attempt in early China to theorize at length about the nature and importance of rituals. This essay is crucial to understanding the importance of ritual in Xunzi's philosophy of self-cultivation, of which there is no shortage of analysis.1 Most of this analysis centers on the notion of ritual in general, but Xunzi's essay also reveals his reaction to several criticisms to specific ritual practices, especially mourning rituals and ancestral sacrifices, that (...)
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  47.  1
    New Treatise on the Uniqueness of Consciousness by Xiong Shili.Jana S. Rošker - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):605-611.
    New Treatise on the Uniqueness of Consciousness is an annotated translation by John Makeham of Xiong Shili's major philosophical work Xin weishi lun 新唯識論, one of the most difficult and least understood of the crucial Chinese theoretical works of the twentieth century. In this work Xiong has integrated central concepts, problems, and themes from traditional Chinese philosophy with those representative of Sinitic Buddhist philosophy in order to create an ambitious philosophical syncretism.On the one hand, the book is a modern Confucian (...)
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  48. Plotinus and Buddhism.Theodore Sabo - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):494-505.
    Under the influence of the mysterious Ammonius Saccas, Plotinus conceived a desire to learn Persian and Indian philosophy firsthand. This led him to a romantic participation in the emperor Gordian's ill-fated Persian expedition. He managed to escape to Antioch and two years later began teaching in Rome.1 It is unlikely he was vouchsafed any contact with Hinduism or Buddhism,2 but the parallels between his thought and especially Buddhist philosophy are striking. The parallels with Buddhism are closer than with Hinduism since (...)
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  49. Psychological Solutions to Metaphysical Problems in the Pārāyaṇa-Vagga.Eviatar Shulman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):506-530.
    The understanding of early Buddhist philosophy oscillates between two binary opposed interpretations. On the one hand we find a metaphysical system that hinges on the doctrine of karma and the attempt to exit saṃsāra. Here the Buddha is thought to attain a transcendence that takes place in some indescribable existential or ontological realm. On the other hand we encounter an empirical approach that sees the Buddha as a thinker who denied the credibility of metaphysical speculation and who advocated the relinquishing (...)
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  50.  1
    The Importance of "My" Being Single: A Response to Jiri Benovsky.Siderits Mark - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):553-558.
    Given how much the issue of the self and diachronic personal identity has been discussed in recent decades, one might wonder why something like Benovsky's pluralist-self view has not already been proposed and critically examined. It does, after all, look promising as a way to negotiate a settlement between the partisans of self and of nonself. For it gives the first party what it says it wants—ontological commitment to selves—while also granting the nonself theorists their core claim that there is (...)
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  51.  2
    On the Concept of World Philosophy.Saranindranath Tagore - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):531-544.
    The question of possibility, as Kant well knew, turns on the pivot of skepticism. These remarks are designed to service the task of answering the question of how comparative philosophy is possible, given the pivot and the turn. I will first show how the idea of comparative philosophy can be challenged from two directions. Second, I will attempt to resolve the skeptical concerns by arguing for the concept of world philosophy as the pivot on which comparative philosophy turns, thereby addressing (...)
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