Year:

  1.  4
    Kelly Agra (2015). The World as "Is" and the World as "Ought". Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):68-79.
    Within this working context, this paper exammes how philosophy is situated within the horizon of circulated knowledge. Using Alain Badiou's discussion about the fate of philosophy after Hegel, this paper highlights three distinct phenomena: the end of philosophy, the linguistic turn, and the suture of philosophy to other disciplines. This paper argues that these three signal a paradigm shift in philosophizing, namely, the shift of orientation from the metaphysical to the finite. After the discussion about contemporary philosophy, this paper argues (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  3
    Robin Byerly (2015). Eudaemonia, Well-Beings and the Pursuit of Sustainability. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):45-59.
    Human well-being is a core global issue and a challenge for individual citizens, governments, and intemational organizations world-wide. It is a future-oriented concept that cannot be narrowly defined. In this paper, it is argued that retrieving the wisdom of Aristotle provides a thmking way forward. His is a philosophy that can be meaningfully directed and usefully applied across multiple dimensions to our current world, its state of being, and the pursuit of human, psychological, and ecological well-bemg.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  4
    Burcu Gurkan & Taine Duncan (2015). Doing Philosophy in the Contemporary World. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):28-34.
    As a recent addition to the editorial board for the journal of Philosophy in the Contemporary World, I wanted to revisit a practice from past editions of the journal—interviewing philosophers who engage philosophical practice that reflects the mission of PCW. In this interview, a model for what I hope will continue to be a regular feature, I have a dialogue with the philosopher Burcu Gurkan. Professor Gurkan currently lives and works in Turkey while I live in work in the central (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  6
    Charles Harvey (2015). Sex Robots and Solipsism. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):80-93.
    "Sex Robots and Solipsism" presents and reflects upon rapidly evolving developments in human-robot relations. It argues that psychological, phenomenological and neuro-physiological evidence suggests that our new media-saturated environment is eroding the human capacity for deep and prolonged concentration, empathy and attachment. As machines become more human-like, humans become more machine-like. This sets the stage for diminished relations between humans - shallow relations that are increasingly capable of being replaced by relations with artificially intelligent machines.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  4
    Sergia Hay & Greg Hibbard (2015). Why Ignorance Fails to Excuse Climate Debt. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):60-67.
    The United States has rejected climate reparations requests from other nations by claiming historical ignorance of the global effects of anthropogenic climate change. This objection to climate reparations, called the epistemic objection in this paper, appeals to a concept of fairness concerning moral responsibility which can be traced back to Aristotle's distinction between voluntary and involuntary actions. However, on closer examination, the epistemic objection fails to fulfill Aristotle's criteria for excusable involuntary actions, and therefore the authors of this paper conclude (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  6
    Sanjay Lal (2015). On Widening The Moral Sphere. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):1-11.
    Considerations of justice and rights are assumed to present problems for the idea that we should do that which we take to be supererogatory. I argue that careful consideration of how we think of justice and rights lead to the conclusion that "supererogatory" actions are actually better grouped within the class of acts we identify as moral requirements. My argument is based on our common understanding of justice as being incompatible with free-riding. Additionally, I focus attention on our implicit assumption (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Christian Matlieis (2015). Hegel's Reproduction Issues. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):12-27.
    What if popular discourses of recognition and identity tend to rely, in whole or in part, on underlying conceptions of reproduction -- specifically, the desire to reproduce one's own self-consciousness in the beliefs and behaviors of others? I argue for the importance of diagnosing a recognition/reproduction paradigm in which foreground discourses of recognition obfuscate an underlying evangelical desire for reproduction of one's own self-image. To do so, I revisit G.W.F. Hegel's allegory of the lord/bondsman, arguably the decisive source of modem (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  2
    Landon W. Schurtz (2015). The Business of Complaining Ethically. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):35-44.
    Beginning from an analysis of what factors disqualify a person from complaining about a given moral breach, I show that the prima facie presumption that a complaint is justified in the face of non-moral offense in the context of a business transaction must be balanced against the potential consequences to the object of the complaint, especially given the particular realities of popular employment practices. In particular, I will identify three cases in which complamts are justified, presuming unjust employment arrangements, as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  2
    Joan Woolfrey (2015). The Infectiousness of Hope. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (2):94-103.
    Perhaps not wholly unrelatedly to the message of the first Obama presidential campaign, the concept of hope has been receiving increased philosophical attention in recent years. A good bit has been written on honing a definition of hope, and investigating the morally relevant territory. After a brief summary of that literature, I situate myself amongst those who advocate for hope—at its best—as a virtue, and I then suggest that hope seems to have a unique status amongst the virtues insofar as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  8
    Travis T. Anderson (2015). Artistic Freedom in Kant and Hegel. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):67-79.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  5
    Spencer Bradley (2015). The Face of Modern Art. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):80-90.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  8
    Gregory L. Burgin (2015). Danto's Error. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):37-49.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    Joshua M. Hall (2015). Apposite Bodies. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):19-36.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  4
    Joe Frank Jones Iii (2015). Being There. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):4-18.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  8
    Raymond Kolcaba (2015). Editor's Introduction. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):1-3.
  16.  5
    Raymond Kolcaba (2015). Finding Art in the World. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):91-103.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  8
    Stephen Snyder (2015). Danto's Narrative Philosophy of History and the End of Art. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 22 (1):50-66.
    This paper investigates Danto’s claims that the narrative of art is over. In this state, which Danto sees as ideal, art is free from any master narrative, and its direction cannot be predicted. The claim that art ought to remain in its current state—pluralistic, free and with no further historical development—is problematic. Danto is correct that late 20th c. art could not be explained through a single narrative, and the myriad forms art takes demonstrate its pluralism. But Danto’s claim that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues