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  1.  2
    Using Values as Evidence When There’s Evidence for Your Values.Sharyn Clough - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):5-37.
    I have argued that political values are beliefs informed, more or less well, by the evidence of experience and that, where relevant and well-supported by evidence, the inclusion of political values in scientific theorizing can increase the objectivity of research. The position I endorse has been called the “values-as-evidence” approach. In this essay I respond to three kinds of resistance to this approach, using examples of feminist political values. Solomon questions whether values are beliefs that can be tested, Alcoff argues (...)
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  2.  1
    Rethinking Belonging in a Globalized World.Grace Goh - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):127-137.
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  3.  1
    Covid 19, Disability, and the Ethics of Distributing Scarce Resources.James B. Gould - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):38-68.
    The Covid-19 pandemic provides a real-world context for evaluating the fairness of disability-based rationing of scarce medical resources. I discuss three situations clinicians may face: rationing based on disability itself; rationing based on inevitable disability-related comorbidities; and rationing based on preventable disability-related comorbidities. I defend three conclusions. First, in a just distribution, extraneous factors do not influence a person’s share. This rules out rationing based on disability alone, where no comorbidities decrease a person’s capacity to benefit from treatment. Second, in (...)
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  4.  52
    iZombie Cyborg Dancers: Rechoreographing Smartphone Abusers.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):105-126.
    Compulsive smartphone users’ psyches, today, are increasingly directed away from their bodies and onto their devices. This phenomenon has now entered our global vocabulary as “smartphone zombies,” or what I will call “iZombies.” Given the importance of mind to virtually all conceptions of human identity, these compulsive users could thus be productively understood as a kind of human-machine hybrid entity, the cyborg. Assuming for the sake of argument that this hybridization is at worst axiologically neutral, I will construct a kind (...)
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  5.  2
    Insatiable: Why Everything is Not Enough.Charles Harvey - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):69-89.
    In this essay, I argue that the deepest roots of Homo sapiens’ propensity towards excessive consumption lie in the emptiness of human awareness, itself possibly rooted in brain plasticity. I attempt to demonstrate how this insight emerged and appeared repeatedly throughout the history of philosophy and religious thought and how industrialized capitalism and consumer culture led to the current domination and envelopment of our lives by the “commodity canopy.” In the final section of the paper, I envision one way that (...)
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  6.  2
    George Yancy. Across Black Spaces: Essays and Interviews From an American Philosopher (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2020). Kindle Edition.Brian Hisao Onishi - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):138-148.
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  7.  3
    Should A.I. Be Your Therapist?Lawrence Quill - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):90-104.
    Recent advances in Artificial Intelligence and their application within the field of mental health provision raise issues that cross social, economic, and philosophical boundaries. While Therapeutic A.I. promises to disrupt the current provision of mental health services to reach populations without access to adequate mental health care there are risks. This paper addresses the philosophical problems posed by Therapeutic A.I. I suggest that in the absence of legal guidelines there is a need for philosophical guidance that prioritizes the dignity of (...)
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