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  1.  3
    Differences in Becoming.Emmanuel Alloa & Judith Michalet - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):475-502.
    For a long time, Gilbert Simondon’s work was known only as either a philosophy restricted to the problem of technology or as an inspirational source for Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy of difference. As Simondon’s thinking is now finally in the process of being recognized in its own right as one of the most original philosophies of the twentieth century, this also entails that some critical work needs to be done to disentangle it from an all too hasty identification with Deleuzian categories. (...)
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  2.  2
    Organicism and Perspectivism From Leibniz to Hegel.Paolo Diego Bubbio - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):785-791.
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  3.  3
    Italian New Realism and Transcendental Philosophy.Michele Cardani & Marco Tamborini - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):539-554.
    By recognizing Immanuel Kant as the founder of the so-called being-knowing fallacy, the Italian new realism proposed and defended by Maurizio Ferraris argues for the autonomy of ontology from epistemology. The dependence of reality on our conceptual framework would in fact transform our world in a system of beliefs that loses its connection with the “hardness” of the given data. This paper discusses Ferraris’s claims by maintaining that they are based upon an insufficient reading of history of philosophy, particularly, upon (...)
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  4. From Eyesight to Insight.Stuart Dalton - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):633-653.
    Descartes’s work as a philosopher was inspired by three dreams he had on November 10, 1619, and yet the philosophy that Descartes produced in response to this inspiration included an argument that all dreams are deceptive. This particular incongruity is indicative of a more general ambivalence and anxiety in Descartes’s thought concerning images, which creates a tension that is never fully resolved. In this essay I focus primarily on one side of that tension: the part of Descartes’s philosophy that is (...)
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  5. Responsibility and the Physical Body.Geoffrey Dierckxsens - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):573-593.
    This article examines Paul Ricoeur’s discussion of analytical philosophy of language. I argue that Ricoeur’s idea of responsibility is exemplary for understanding this discussion and for understanding how Ricoeur conceives of the task of phenomenological hermeneutics in relation to analytical philosophy and cognitive science. According to Ricoeur, analytical philosophy of language explains how we use ordinary language for ascribing responsibility to the actions of agents. I argue that Ricoeur shows that the task of cognitive science is similar: explaining the causal (...)
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  6. Logics of Scission.Dominik Finkelde - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):595-618.
    Badiou and Wittgenstein focus in their works on potentialities of innovation in the realm of thought as well as in the realm of politics. These innovations manifest themselves especially when two seemingly contrasting jurisdictions of thought—present in politics and logic—meet and merge. For Badiou a set-theoretical process of enforcement may change pre-established templates of a political doxa. For Wittgenstein it is the spontaneity of concept-formations that crisscross referential relations within the “space of reasons” and through performative enactments make visible unexpected (...)
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  7.  2
    Does Leibniz Have Any Place in a History of Racism?John Harfouch - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):737-755.
    I claim that a genealogy of the philological racism known as ‘orientalism’ should include Leibniz as a founding figure. This argument is framed and motivated by recent publications that seek to exclude Leibniz from the history of race and racism by arguing that he insists on a linguistic, rather than ‘racial,’ schematic of human diversity. A survey of nineteenth-century race theory reveals that this distinction is not only specious, but these recent defenses only further implicate Leibniz in the linguistic tradition (...)
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  8. Understandings and Standings Under.Helenius Timo - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):555-572.
    Scholars—philosophers and scientists alike—have recently reintroduced the New Realism movement, which has its roots in the soil of early twentieth-century philosophy, as a challenge to continental philosophy. This essay will propose a “BLT correction” in order to criticize, instead of support, the current tendency to underestimate the insightfulness of phenomenological and hermeneutical philosophy. The paper will discuss a hermeneutic of Idols proposed by Francis Bacon, and will conclude by proposing Paul Ricoeur’s correlating inclusion of objectifying explanation as a necessary phase (...)
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  9. Humans and Animals.John Lechte - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):655-678.
    This article is a further philosophical engagement with the human-animal relation. The argument presented is that neither animals nor humans can be reduced to a biological essence characterised as ‘bare life,’ but live according to the call of a way of life. Heidegger’s thinking on the polis in terms of the animal-human relation is addressed in order to show how he reduces animality to a biological sub-stratum, while the human becomes the privileged bearer of the word. Heidegger’s deep-seated humanism is (...)
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  10. Neither Ghost Nor Machine.Jennifer Mensch - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):811-814.
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  11. The Critical Function of the Epigenesis of Reason and Its Relation to Post-Kantian Intellectual Intuition.Dalia Nassar - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):801-809.
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  12. The Metaphysics of the Epigenesis of Reason.Michael J. Olson - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):793-799.
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  13.  1
    Richard A. Lee Jr., The Thought of Matter: Materialism, Conceptuality, and the Transcendence of Immanence.Daniel P. Pepe - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):775-784.
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  14. Race, Reason, and Cultural Difference in the Work of Emmanuel Eze.Franklin Perkins - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):757-774.
    This article argues for the importance of the work of Emmanuel Eze as a resource for confronting the relationship between philosophy and cultural difference. Eze is one of few philosophers to have contributed important research in the three main areas relevant to the relationship between philosophy and cultural difference: 1) analysis of the formation of philosophy as exclusively European, through his work on race and the Enlightenment; 2) engagement with the philosophies of other cultures, through his work in African philosophy; (...)
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  15.  1
    Lacan and the Philosophical Soul.Ruth Ronen - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):619-632.
    By closely reading Lacan’s references to the way philosophers use the notion of the “soul,” this paper suggests that the soul represents whatever in the body is unattainable to thought. The paper aims to reveal the philosophical moment in which a soul distinguishes itself from both mind and body and to show that this moment, in which a soul is summoned by philosophers, is needed in order to overcome the fundamental alienation of the body with regard to thought. Lacan’s way (...)
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  16.  1
    An Arendtian Recognitive Politics.Yasemin Sari - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):709-735.
    Working with Hannah Arendt’s implicit argument about place and visibility, this article develops an account of recognition in order to rethink the nature of community. I argue for an Arendtian recognitive politics, a two-tiered account of recognition, which takes into account social identities as the condition of possibility for the free political action that so animated Arendt. If we require a place to act freely, in other words, we are visible to another in that place. Claims such as Arendt’s “right (...)
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  17. Camus and the Virtues.Matthew Sharpe - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):679-708.
    Albert Camus can be meaningfully read as an agent-focussed virtue ethicist, as David Sherman has suggested. Yet moving far beyond Sherman’s version of this claim, we show here how Camus accepts what are four definitive parameters of the classical authors’ conception of the virtues—the last of which takes him beyond today’s recognised “virtue ethicists.” Firstly, he understands the virtues as lasting, beneficent dispositions to think, feel, and act in certain ways. Secondly, he conceives the virtues as mastering the untethered passions: (...)
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  18.  1
    Some Ways to Speculative Aesthetics.Sparrow Tom - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):523-537.
    Continental philosophy is witnessing a global renaissance of speculative philosophy. And while some corners of this movement are gaining traction in art- and architecture-theoretical circles, its application to philosophical aesthetics has been forestalled in favor of metaphysical and, secondarily, epistemological inquiry. This essay tracks some of the ways that speculative aesthetics is emerging, and opening new pathways, within the renaissance. It accomplishes three primary tasks. First, it enumerates several of the ways that the name “speculative aesthetics” has been mobilized in (...)
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  19.  1
    The Education of Philosophy.Samuel Talcott - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):503-521.
    This paper questions the widespread assumption that education can and should mold students to socially desirable ends. It proceeds by sketching an important part of the intellectual history informing Foucault’s genealogy of this assumption’s emergence in a disciplinary society. This history involves Georges Canguilhem, Foucault’s elective master. And in the relation between the writings of master and student, we find a different exemplification of education, namely, as a thoroughly dialogical and philosophical activity undertaken for the sake of freedom. Examining this (...)
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  20.  4
    Richard Rorty.Barry Allen - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):315-318.
    A memoir of Richard Rorty as a teacher, a philosopher, an intellectual, and a man of letters, by a former student.
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  21.  2
    The Rub of the Negative.Jennifer Ann Bates - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):439-450.
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  22.  3
    The Ends of Negation.Andrew Benjamin - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):451-460.
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  23.  2
    Learning How to See.Judith Butler & Gayle Salamon - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):319-337.
    In this interview, Judith Butler remembers her teacher, the phenomenologist Maurice Natanson. Natanson observed that learning how to see is central to both teaching and learning, and Professor Butler reflects on Natanson’s views of the relation between perception, pedagogy, and world-making. She discusses the possibilities and limits of phenomenology, and its engagements with intentionality, reason, and faith. Professor Butler also reflects on the influence of phenomenology on her theory of gender performativity as well as her recent work on bodies in (...)
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  24. Teaching and Learning at the Autonomous University During Barcelona’s Seventies.Jaume Casals - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):305-313.
    The memories of the teaching we had during the seventies at the Autonomous University of Barcelona show, forty years later, that this teaching was not a matter of a premeditated learning program. However, the diversity of the teachers we knew, their characters and examples, project a certain shadow of a philosophical experience that has been shared by several generations of contemporary Catalan philosophers.
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  25. A Dialectic of Dissatisfaction.Simon Critchley & Alexander Kardjian Elnabli - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):291-303.
    Simon Critchley discusses his views on education and philosophy, reflecting on his experiences as a student from childhood to the present, his anxieties about teaching, and what philosophical writing he wants from his students. By discussing his relationships with influential teachers in his life, Dr. Critchley explores the problem of teachers as masters; the need to develop philosophy’s approach to tradition while engaging problems posed to it by work on race and gender; his experience conducting online, public philosophy through The (...)
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  26. Hamlet’s Potentiality.Andrew Cutrofello - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):461-473.
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  27.  1
    Today's Psychotic Academy.Creston Davis - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):379-387.
    This essay examines Slavoj Žižek’s radical pedagogy by drawing on his concepts of parallax and his gloss on objet petit a.
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  28.  1
    Philosophy and Its Relation to Other Disciplines in Derrida’s Writings on Education.Samir Haddad - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):365-377.
    In this essay I examine Derrida’s attempts to transform how philosophy is conceived, specifically as this occurs in his writings on education. In these writings Derrida challenges two understandings of philosophy—in his interventions into debates on lycée education he targets philosophy in France, while in texts related to the founding of the Collège International de Philosophie at stake is philosophy understood as a broader European institution. I argue that in each case key in Derrida’s challenge is his rethinking of philosophy’s (...)
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  29. Care of Death.C. Long - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):351-363.
    A homage in the guise of an essay, this is the story of the last course Reiner Schürmann taught. As a text, it attempts to describe, situate, and come to terms with the power of Schürmann’s teaching in the context of his last lectures on Heidegger’s Being and Time. But if it is to be true to the deepest lessons of Schürmann’s thinking, it will also need to be heard as an invitation to interpret together the significance of his reading (...)
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  30. Complex Identities and Relational Freedoms.A. McLaren Margaret - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):399-408.
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  31.  2
    What’s Love Got To Do With It?Johanna Meehan - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):409-421.
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  32. Danto as Educator.Sandra Shapshay - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):339-349.
    This essay offers a discussion of how Arthur Danto educated me philosophically both through his personal example and through his work. Along the way, I detail what I take to be his most important lesson: to engage deeply and seriously with the subject of one’s philosophy, in his case predominantly art, and thus always to retain contact with the world outside of philosophy. Danto modeled a truly engaged philosopher of art, attending to history, actual practices and contemporary currents, without sacrificing (...)
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  33.  3
    Towards a Philosophical Education.Gianni Vattimo & Gabriel Serbu - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):281-290.
    The aim of this interview has been to rekindle the debate surrounding the meaning and purpose of education in today’s society. Is a humanistic education still relevant in a world obsessed with scientific proof and driven by a problem-solving mentality, or is it becoming obsolete, as some experts in education seem to suggest?. While recalling, often humorously, his own experience as both a student and an educator, Vattimo stresses the importance of freedom for the emergence of critical thinking—or, better, actual (...)
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  34. Identities and Freedom.Allison Weir - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):423-438.
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  35.  2
    Cosmic Cinema.Martin Woessner - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):389-398.
    It is well known that the American director Terrence Malick studied philosophy under Stanley Cavell and translated the work of Martin Heidegger. He eventually traded Harvard and Oxford for Hollywood, though. This essay traces Malick's evolution from budding academic philosopher to cinematic innovator. It suggests that Malick's cinematic career should be viewed as both a rejection of academic philosophy and a celebration of the examined life.
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  36.  1
    Introduction to the Special Issue: On Philosophical Education.Santiago Zabala - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (2):267-280.
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  37.  5
    The Cogito and the Gift.Gabriel Andrus - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):211-232.
    Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenology has received much attention recently, both critical and constructive, but much less work has been done looking at the relationship between Marion’s work on Descartes and his phenomenological project. The present article begins by making a point of clarifying Marion’s understanding of the meaning of Descartes’s cogito, and contrasting it with the standard understanding as found in Leibniz, Kant, and Heidegger. Following the discussion of these various interpretations of the cogito, we examine some of the similarities between (...)
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  38.  1
    Life and Art.Walter Brogan - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):65-72.
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  39.  2
    Translation ~ Politics.Katharina Clausius - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):249-266.
    The concept of intellectual equality dominates Jacques Rancière’s prolific bibliography and remains fundamental to his aesthetic philosophy. Whereas equality’s relationship to Rancièrean pedagogy, politics, and literature has been discussed at length in recent years, however, I argue that translation represents a sustained and specific focus in Rancière’s political-aesthetic framework, one that scholarship has so far overlooked. This article considers the important but rarely-cited essay “Politics, Identification, and Subjectivization” alongside several of Rancière’s more canonical works in order to trace the role (...)
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  40.  2
    Derrida—De-Distancing—Heidegger.D. J. S. Cross - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):117-134.
    This paper has three interwoven aims: to demonstrate the constitutive role of style in deconstruction, which, when not entirely misconstrued, has yet to be rigorously appreciated; to develop the notion of ‘de-distancing’ as a necessary but overlooked notion for understanding not only the ontological stakes of Dasein in Being in Time but also Derrida’s intervention in the relation between Heidegger, Nietzsche, and the limits of metaphysics; to demonstrate that Derrida’s recourse to de-distancing as the spatiality of woman in Spurs punctures (...)
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  41.  1
    A Dog Does Not Exist but Merely Lives.Antonino Firenze - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):135-154.
    The objective of this paper is to critically revise the anthropocentric perspective that conditions the Heideggerian philosophy of animality. I shall criticize this theoretical assumption as shared by Heidegger in The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude and in some of Heidegger’s later reflections on animality following the Kehre, such as the Letter on Humanism and the Zollikon Seminars. Hence, the main issue I am raising here is that Heidegger’s reflection on animality is revealed as a theoretical strategy aimed (...)
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  42.  1
    Notizen Zu Klee / Notes on Klee.Martin Heidegger, María del Rosario Acosta López, Tobias Keiling, Ian Alexander Moore & Yuliya Aleksandrovna Tsutserova - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):7-17.
    This document gathers together and translates Heidegger’s notes on Paul Klee that have been published up to now.
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  43.  4
    Art and Thinking.Martin Heidegger, Carolyn Culbertson & Tobias Keiling - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):47-51.
    On May 18, 1958, Martin Heidegger led a one-day colloquium in Freiburg on the topic of “Art and Thinking” together with Shin’ichi Hisamatsu, the Japanese philosopher and Buddhist scholar. The protocol of the colloquium, published in volume 16 of Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe, presents a conversation among the colloquium participants about art in the East Asian world. In this conversation, Heidegger is particularly interested in hearing from Hisamatsu about the conception of art present in the East Asian world prior to the introduction (...)
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  44.  3
    Reciprocal Mirroring.Martin Heidegger, Carolyn Culbertson & Tobias Keiling - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):53-57.
    On May 19th, 1958, the day after Martin Heidegger and Shin’ichi Hisamatsu led a one-day colloquium in Freiburg on the topic of “Art and Thinking,” the two men came together to discuss the success of the colloquium. The conversation soon turned to the work of Paul Klee, the Swiss artist, and from there to the newest developments in Heidegger’s thinking about language. Heidegger had just presented some of this new thinking during his lecture on Stefan George’s poem “Das Wort” in (...)
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  45.  2
    Spaces of the Self.Robert S. Leib - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):189-210.
    This article argues that the works of Michel Foucault and Erving Goffman are complementary, specifically in their analyses of disciplinary power. This analysis would be what Foucault calls a ‘micro-physics’ of power. Micro-physics is an important concept even in Foucault’s later lectures, but it remains a sub-discipline of genealogy Foucault himself never pursues. Goffman’s works, which rely upon notions of social performance, personal spaces, and the construction of the self through these, fulfill the conditions of micro-physical analysis well. Using Goffman’s (...)
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  46.  1
    The First Person Singular.Alphonso Lingis - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):85-97.
    How is anxiety the source of knowledge? How can Heidegger identify death as nothingness? How does anxiety engender resoluteness?
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  47. The Fear of the Dog.Katharine Loevy - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):155-173.
    Levinas rarely speaks about non-human animals directly, but his texts and his interviews are saturated with animal rhetoric. Levinas’s most ubiquitous gesture is to cast non-human animals as beings whose striving to live is a form of violence. These images constitute violence as endemic to nature, and provide the essential contrast to what Levinas regards as the strictly human event of ethics. In order to sufficiently interrogate the fate of non-human animals in Levinas’s philosophy, we must address the manner in (...)
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  48.  2
    Agency, Ownness, and Otherness From Stein to Merleau-Ponty.Timothy Mooney - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):175-187.
    My aim in this essay is to show that Edith Stein’s influence on Merleau-Ponty in Phenomenology of Perception is predominantly through her early work On the Problem of Empathy. Though he does not give Stein due acknowledgement, Merleau-Ponty is closer to her philosophically than to her near contemporary Max Scheler, who receives much more attention. Whilst Stein’s influence is in the main difficult to disentangle from that of Husserl, some of her reformulations of and additions to the latter’s ideas are (...)
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  49. General Introduction.Moore Ian Alexander - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):1-2.
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  50.  1
    Crossings of Word and Image.John Sallis - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):59-64.
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  51. On the Ethopoetic Possibilities of the Work of Art.J. Schmidt Dennis - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):73-84.
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  52.  1
    Introduction to Heidegger's "Notes on Klee".Dennis J. Schmidt - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):3-6.
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  53.  1
    Heidegger's Notes on Klee in the Nachlass.Günter Seubold, María del Rosario Acosta López, Tobias Keiling, Ian Alexander Moore & Yulia Aleksandrovna Tsutserova - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):19-28.
    This article gives an account of the material on the art of Paul Klee found in the Nachlass of Martin Heidegger and indicates ideas central to Heidegger’s encounter with Klee.
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  54.  4
    The "Protofigural" and the "Event".Günter Seubold, María del Rosario Acosta López, Tobias Keiling, Ian Alexander Moore & Yuliya Aleksandrovna Tsutserova - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):29-45.
    This article is a translation of the third chapter of Part Four of Günter Seubold’s Kunst als Enteignis, 2nd ed.. It discusses Martin Heidegger’s notes on Paul Klee.
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  55. The Image That Was in the Blood.Beau Shaw - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):233-248.
    This paper critiques Adorno’s interpretation of Paul Celan’s poetry, as well as some of the philosophical ideas that motivate it. For Adorno, Celan’s poetry is “hermetic”—it refuses aesthetic representation; and, by virtue of this hermeticism, it expresses the horror of the Holocaust—a horror whose content is that it refuses aesthetic representation. I give a reading of Celan’s “Tenebrae,” from his 1959 collection Sprachgitter, and show that it uses aesthetic representation; that this use expresses the horror of the Holocaust; and that, (...)
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  56.  9
    Ecological Trust: An Object-Oriented Perspective.Sparrow Tom - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (1):99-115.
    This essay conceives ecological life as radically dependent, vulnerable, and horrific. Epistemologically speaking, we are quite ignorant of the web of dependency that sustains our lives. Our ecological condition often prevents us from locating and identifying our dependencies and the many ways our actions impact the environment. This is the terror and danger that plagues the Anthropocene. Our ignorance bears an ontological weight that can be drawn out with the concept of trust. Trust, I argue, is not a choice. Trust (...)
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