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  1.  2
    Eternity, From Afar Into Intimacy.Rosaria Caldarone - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):927-948.
    According to Heidegger’s philosophy, the essence of time is not chronological; for this reason, history is not a linear succession of facts but is opened up by an event: that is what Heidegger’s philosophy reveals at first glance and it’s also what we can’t consider suspect today. But it is less obvious that the ‘base’ from which time and history will disclose themselves is the phenomenon of love: love stands out in the letters of Heidegger to Hannah Arendt as a (...)
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  2. Terry Eagleton, Hope Without Optimism.Andrew Cooper - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):991-994.
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  3. The Hopeless.Alexander García Düttmann - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):851-858.
    This paper discusses hope and hopelessness in relation to history. It does so by turning to Benjamin’s famous statement that hope exists only for the hopeless, and to Derrida’s late thoughts on solitude and the world.
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  4.  3
    From Ideality to Historicity, What Happens?Juan Manuel Garrido - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):949-973.
    The problem of the origin of geometry is crucial for understanding the formation and development of Derrida’s early conception of historicity. Mathematical idealities offer the most powerful example of meanings that are fully transmissible through history. Against Husserl’s explanation of the particular, Derrida considers that the logic and progression of mathematical idealities can only be explained if they are referred to non-intentional and pre-subjective movements of production and development of significations: language itself, which is structured as non-phonetic writing. Historicity is, (...)
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  5.  2
    Richard F. Hassing, Cartesian Psychophysics and the Whole Nature of Man: On Descartes’s Passions of the Soul.James Griffith - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):989-991.
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  6.  13
    En-Counterings of Time.Werner Hamacher & Peter Hanly - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):839-849.
    The text tries to make plausible the necessity in every thought of time to think an un-time—a 'field' without the form of time that only allows for conceiving of time as a form.
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  7.  1
    Richard Grusin, Ed., The Nonhuman Turn; and Vicki Kirby, Quantum Anthropologies: Life at Large.Will Johncock - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):995-1001.
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  8.  5
    Natural History Today.Susanna Lindberg - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):975-988.
    This essay is a broad overview of philosophy’s capacity of facing the historicity of nature. It shows why classical philosophy of history, especially Hegel, left nature outside of history, and also in what sense this kind of philosophy is outdated. Then it shows how natural sciences discovered historical phenomena since the invention of biology at the very end of the eighteenth century and especially since Darwinism, although these did not examine the philosophical presuppositions of their theories. Assuming that the challenge (...)
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  9. The Apocalypse of Blanchot.Aïcha Liviana Messina & Lena Taub - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):877-892.
    The thoughts of apocalypse can either be intense and demanding, or lead to the risk of abandoning the present to a state of inertia and impotence. The apocalypse can be, in fact, the moment of the Last Judgment. In this case, justice is related to the revelation of truth. But the apocalypse can also be the revelation of the end of any truth, i.e. the revelation that the history doesn’t have any meaning, that the end is as endless as it (...)
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  10.  1
    Beni Vacanti.Nancy Jean-Luc & Hanly Peter - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):869-876.
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  11. History Improvised.Nancy Jean-Luc, Sá Cavalcante Schuback Marcia & Hanly Peter - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):827-838.
    In this text, a dialogue about the difficult task of seizing the sense of history today is presented. The point of departure is the difficulty of the times to begin and the necessity to rethink the difference between historiography and historicity, and further between events, the event and the advent. The dialogue proposes to revisit the meaning of beginning from out the experience of improvisation and to reflect upon the possibility of developing improvisation as a sense of history.
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  12. Facticity and Poietics in History.Tatsuya Nishiyama - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):893-910.
    Modern Japanese thinkers tried to understand “history” as processes of translation through which the Japanese culture/society/nation integrated itself into world history. This paper analyzes Miki Kiyoshi’s Philosophy of History [1932], a prominent example of such an approach to history. His understanding of history is deeply influenced by Martin Heidegger’s thoughts about facticity. The most essential part of Miki’s notion of “history” lies in his practico-poietic conception of history, which is elaborated through his own interpretation of Heidegger. This paper attempts to (...)
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  13.  2
    The Fragility of the Present and the Task of Thinking.Andrea Potestà & Donald Cross - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):911-925.
    This article analyzes Heidegger’s Paris lecture, “The End of Philosophy and the Task of Thinking,” in an attempt to understand the historical “task” that Heidegger seeks to examine when confronted with the agony of philosophy today. I attempt to valorize the understanding of time and history that Heidegger stages in his reading by demonstrating its entrance to be radical and novel with respect to other moments in Heidegger’s production: history here is not of “destiny”, that is, it does not coincide (...)
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  14.  4
    History, Today.Sá Cavalcante Schuback Marcia & Nancy Jean-Luc - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):823-826.
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  15.  1
    The Problem with Loving Whiteness.Alexis Shotwell - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):1003-1013.
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  16.  1
    I Love Myself When I Am... What?Shannon Sullivan - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):1023-1032.
  17.  1
    Comments on Shannon Sullivan’s Good White People: The Problem with Middle-Class White Anti-Racism.Ronald R. Sundstrom - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):1015-1021.
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  18. Fragments on the Philosophy of History.Peter Trawny, Ian Alexander Moore & Christoper Turner - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (4):859-868.
    Philosophy of History is in crisis. This crisis has a structural origin in separating a finitude of the one from an infinitude of the many. This difference seems to produce an aporia. Where could history be that would talk of both?
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  19. Gianni Vattimo.Stefano G. Azzarà - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):703-722.
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  20.  3
    Sex, Ethics, and Method.Ellen K. Feder - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):809-821.
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  21.  4
    On Machiavelli, as an Author, and Passages From His Writings.Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Ian Alexander Moore & Christopher Turner - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):761-788.
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  22.  1
    Hermeneutic Communism and/or Hermeneutic Anarchism.Dimitri Ginev - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):663-685.
  23.  3
    Making Sense of Making Sense of Intersex.Cressida J. Heyes - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):789-797.
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  24.  1
    Ellen Feder's Making Sense of Intersex and the Issue of Sexual Difference.Lisa Folkmarson Käll - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):799-807.
  25. Theses on Weak Ecology.Michael Marder - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):651-662.
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  26. Gianni Vattimo and the Challenge of Thought.Silvia Mazzini & Stephan Strunz - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):641-649.
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  27.  1
    Renewing Materialism.Jeffrey W. Robbins - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):687-702.
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  28.  2
    Essere Italiano.David Edward Rose - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):621-640.
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  29.  1
    Gianni Vattimo’s Media Philosophy and Its Relevance to Digital Media.Wolfgang Sützl - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):743-759.
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  30. Vattimo at 80.Robert T. Valgenti - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):615-620.
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  31.  4
    Being and Information.Ashley Woodward - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (3):723-741.
  32.  4
    Secularizing Kenosis.Mark Alznauer - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):609-614.
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  33.  2
    The Problem of Authority in Arendt and Aristotle.Andrew Benjamin - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):253-276.
    The aim of the paper is to examine the limits of Aristotle’s and Arendt’s contributions to a philosophical anthropology. By focusing on the concept of ‘potentiality’—and thus the ‘good life’ as a potentiality awaiting actualization—the limit emerges from the way Aristotle understands ‘life.’ His discussion of slavery is pivotal in this regard.
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  34. Note From the Editors.Peg Birmingham & Ian Alexander Moore - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):427-427.
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  35.  1
    Through the Fold.Sanja Dejanovic - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):325-345.
    In a short paper bearing the title “The Deleuzian Fold of Thought”, Jean-Luc Nancy engages a concept that has a prominent place in contemporary continental philosophy, the fold, so as to accentuate a shared tendency that nevertheless estranges his own thought from Gilles Deleuze’s. This shared tendency deals with the shifting conception of thinking through the fold itself, the unfolding and refolding of the fold, which in its discontinuity has transformed the image of what it means to think. I do (...)
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  36.  9
    Benjamin, Einstein, Nietzsche.Peter Fenves - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):537-543.
    The brief paper discusses the final sections of Miguel Vatter’s with particular attention to its use of popular science. Taking its point of departure from Vatter’s contention that Benjamin’s image of two counteracting forces in the so-called “Theological-Political Fragment” refers to Einstein’s inclusion of a cosmological constant in the equations of general relativity, the paper shows that this suggestion, while intriguing, is improbable. By contrasting Benjamin’s and Nietzsche’s use of popular science with Vatter’s, the paper concludes by asking whether the (...)
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  37. Adversity and Practices of Painting.Véronique M. Fóti - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):397-405.
    Merleau-Ponty’s abiding interest in the art and the enigmatic person of Paul Cézanne focuses importantly on both the pictorial expression of space, and on the freedom of artistic creation in the face of adversity. Examining these issues in relation to the art of Claude Monet, together with Monet’s status as a precursor of painterly abstraction, one can follow the Merleau-Pontyan “indirect logic of institution” to confront the work of Joan Mitchell, within the parameters of gestural abstraction, so as to consider (...)
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  38.  2
    National Socialism, Anti-Semitism, and Philosophy in Heidegger and Scheler.Johannes Fritsche - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):583-608.
    According to Trawny, Heidegger’s Black Notebooks show that he turned away from any National Socialism in 1938 and that his thinking could be “contaminated” by National Socialism and anti-Semitism only between 1931 and 1944/1945. However, in this paper it is argued that already in Being and Time Heidegger had made a case for National Socialism; that he discovered in 1938 the “true” National Socialism, and that Trawny’s main criterion regarding Heidegger’s anti-Semitism is false. Heidegger’s case is compared with Max Scheler, (...)
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  39.  3
    Absence of Soil, Historicity, and Goethe in Heidegger's Being and Time.Johannes Fritsche - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):429-445.
    In a paper entitled “Emmanuel Faye: The Introduction of Fraud into Philosophy?”, Thomas Sheehan accuses Faye of committing many blunders in Heidegger: The Introduction of Nazism into Philosophy. In this paper, I address what is according to Sheehan himself the most important part of his paper, namely his charges against Faye’s interpretation of Heidegger’s Being and Time. I show that they are all wholly unfounded. All the aspects of Being and Time that Sheehan addresses speak not only not against Faye (...)
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  40.  14
    Action and Forgetting: Bergson’s Theory of Memory.Messay Kebede - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):347–370.
    This paper is about the Bergsonian synchronization of the perpetual present or memory with the passing present or the body. It shows how forgetting narrows and focuses consciousness on the needs of action and how motor memory allows the imagining of the useful side of memory. The paper highlights the strength of Bergson’s analysis by respectively confronting classical theories of memory, the highly regarded perspective of the phenomenological school, Deleuze’s interpretation of Bergsonism, and Sartre’s theory of mental imagery.
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  41.  2
    Eternal Life and the Time of Death.Gil Morejón - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):553-564.
    In this paper I argue that Vatter’s proposed solution to the problem of thanatopolitics in the development of a concept of eternal life is inadequate. In the first section I situate Vatter’s project, sketching out Foucault’s concept of biopolitics and marking Vatter’s specific difference from others working to articulate an affirmative biopolitics in contemporary discussions. In the second section I argue, following Foucault and Mbembe, that the possibility of a thanatopolitics or necropolitics that institutes regimes of mass death by racist (...)
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  42. The Right of Reply to Professor Sheehan.Gaëtan Pégny - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):447-479.
    In this article, I address the anti-academic procedures by which Professor Thomas Sheehan affirms that I “continue” a “scam,” before presenting in a greater detail my work on the notion of being as a code name in Heidegger. In sections 3, 4, and 5, I analyze the way in which Sheehan authoritatively hollows out the state of the debate around the interpretation of Heidegger and the weakness of his philological interpretation. Finally, in the last section, I return to the necessity (...)
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  43. The Melancholic and Messianic Allure of Venice, or How Best to Access the Inaccessible.Frances Restuccia - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):371-395.
    This article engages Agamben’s view that philosophy and poetry need to remarry, to heal a fracture that springs from the origin of Western culture between knowing and having the object. While Agamben would like philosophy to wax more poetic and poetry to show more awareness of its philosophical implications, he also encourages direct interventions between these two arenas. This essay thus stages an interpenetration of poetic writing and philosophy. James’s embodiment of Agamben’s theory of melancholia in The Aspern Papers set (...)
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  44. Response to Miguel Vatter's The Republic of the Living: Biopollitics and the Critique of Civil Society.Alessia Ricciardi - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):545-552.
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  45. Ontology of Movement.Pierre Rodrigo - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):407-425.
    In addressing the fundamental issues of Merleau-Ponty’s last ontology, for which Being is an expressive movement, this paper focuses on Merleau-Ponty’s reflections on painting, sculpture and, mainly, cinema. Two reasons justify such a choice. The first one is that Merleau-Ponty’s reflections on films as artistic objects are starting to become better known, while an exclusive privilege has been too long given to his texts on painting, sculpture and literature. An enrichment of our reading of his aesthetics and ontology is thus (...)
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  46.  2
    L’Affaire Faye: Faut-Il Brûler Heidegger?Thomas Sheehan - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):481-535.
    L’affaire Faye: Johannes Fritsche’s bizarre Historical Destiny and National Socialism in Heidegger’s Being and Time mistranslates every key term in Sein und Zeit §74 and distorts the entire book. Gaëtan Pégny’s justification of Emmanuel Faye’s mistranslations of Heidegger is beyond irresponsible. François Rastier’s “Open Letter to Philosophy Today” lends uncritical support to Faye’s dubious “scholarship.”.
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  47. Ernst Bloch’s Laboratorium possibilis Salutis.Salomon J. Terreblanche - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):277-294.
    This article considers Ernst Bloch’s philosophy of hope in terms of its significance for debates in contemporary humanist thought. It is argued that Bloch achieves a commendable balance between, on the one hand, the maintenance of Utopian ideals, and, on the other hand, ethical vigilance towards the vulnerable position of the human individual. Bloch’s Utopian hermeneutics offers a corrective to the limitations and shortcomings of anti-totalitarian humanism. The potential for a constructive dialogue between an interpretation of Bloch’s work and anti-totalitarian (...)
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  48.  1
    From Bare Life to Eternal Life.Miguel Vatter - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):565-581.
    This response discusses the possibility of an affirmative biopolitics based on a materialist and atheist idea of eternal life in light of some of the challenges raised by the critiques of Morejón, Ricciardi, and Fenves. The first challenge concerns whether an affirmative biopolitics is at all possible given that biopolitics contains as an immanent possibility a racial politics that leads to a “necropolitics”. The second challenge concerns the political character of Italian theory, especially in Agamben, and its relation to communism (...)
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  49. Cosmopolitan Political Theology in Cohen and Rosenzweig.Miguel Vatter - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):295-324.
    This article discusses the relation between Judaism and political theology in the work of Hermann Cohen and Franz Rosenzweig. Both Cohen and Rosenzweig give an interpretation of Judaism that prioritizes the messianic ideal while maintaining the priority of philosophy over religion. With respect to political theology, this article argues that Cohen and Rosenzweig criticize the priority assigned to the national state in modern politics in favour of a politics that is both cosmopolitan and republican, in so far as it makes (...)
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  50. The Monstrosity of Matter in Motion.Andrea Bardin - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):25-43.
    Along the path opened by Galileo’s mechanics, early modern mechanical philosophy provided the metaphysical framework in which ‘matter in motion’ underwent a process of reduction to mathematical description and to physical explanation. The struggle against the monstrous contingency of matter in motion generated epistemological monsters in the domains of both the natural and civil science. In natural philosophy Descartes’s institution of Reason as a disembodied subject dominated the whole process. In political theory it was Hobbes who opposed the artificial unity (...)
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  51.  4
    Phenomenology, Meaning, and Measure.Steven Crowell - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):237-252.
    This paper responds to comments by Maxime Doyon and Thomas Sheehan on aspects of my book, Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger. Among the topics discussed are the relations between phenomenology and analytic philosophy, the difference between a Brentanian and an Husserlian approach to intentional content, the normative structure of the intentional content of noetic states such as thinking and imagining, the implications of taking a phenomenological approach to Heidegger’s concept of “being,” Heidegger’s “correlationism,” and the normative character of (...)
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  52. The Power of the Monstrous.Filippo De Lucchese & Caroline A. Williams - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):1-6.
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  53.  6
    Intentionality and Normativity.Maxime Doyon - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):207-221.
    The paper is organized around two ideas that come out in Steve Crowell’s Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger and that I discuss critically in turn. The first concerns the reach of Crowell’s claim according to which the connection between intentionality, meaning and normativity is necessary in all forms of intentional experience. I make my point by considering the case of imagining experiences, which are—I argue—meaningful, intentional, but not necessarily normative in any relevant sense. The second question is about (...)
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  54. A Pragmatics of Political Judgment.Oliver Feltham - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):45-70.
    The question of political judgement is usually addressed within a normative or epistemological framework. In contrast in this paper the approach is that of a pragmatics of judgement. The leading questions are what does political judgement do and how does it operate? This enquiry, carried out through an examination of political judgement in Thomas Hobbes and Baruch Spinoza, is shown to ineluctably lead to an ontology of action. These philosophers’ contrasting ontologies give rise to two different frameworks for political judgement (...)
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  55.  3
    Absolute and Relative Perfection of the "Monsters". Politics and History in Giacomo Leopardi.Fabio Frosini - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):107-123.
    In Leopardi’s writings the idea of the monster/monstrous means a deviation from nature or a consequence of something that is considered monstrous because it belongs to, or reflects a taste or a set of criteria of evaluation belonging to another time or place. There is therefore both an absolute and a relative meaning of monster/monstrous, according to whether it refers to the real history of mankind, which progressively diverged from nature, or to the imaginary foundation of taste and judgement. Nonetheless, (...)
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  56. Diderot’s Monsters, Between Physiology and Politics.Annie Ibrahim - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):125-138.
    The monstrous power of the blind in Diderot’s 1949 Letter is not due to its ability to make people laugh or afraid, as its most common etymology would indicate: monstrum, monstrare, to point to an abnormal fact. The monstrous power of Diderot’s monster is that of one who shows: monere, monitor, in the manner of a guide or pathfinder. It shows us that everything that lives, and especially the human being, is a hybrid. It takes the idea of a possible (...)
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  57. Ubu-Esque Sovereign, Monstrous Individual.Ege Selin Islekel - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):175-191.
    Foucault characterizes the defining feature of modern politics in terms of a new form of power concerned with maximizing life, biopolitics, as opposed to the sovereign right to kill. This characterization becomes problematic, especially when the overwhelming frequency of death and massacres in the twentieth century is considered. The question of how so much death is produced in an economy of power concerned with the maximization of life has stirred considerable debate. This paper argues that there is a death-function internal (...)
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  58. Monsters of Biopower.A. Kiarina Kordela - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):193-205.
    This paper argues that today the true source of terror in the economico-biopolitically advanced countries of global capitalism lies in biopower’s own constitution as a normative field that presupposes its exception as its own precondition. At the two extreme poles of this exception we find “terrorism,” and particularly suicide bombing, and unmanned aerial vehicles, as the pair revealing the core of biopower. However, of the two only “terrorism” is discursively constructed in the “West” as a monstrous act that should incite (...)
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  59.  1
    The Beast and the Sovereign According to Hobbes.Arnaud Milanese - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):71-88.
    Hobbes obviously thought politics with metaphors relating politics to bestiality and monstrosity: in De Cive, a man is a wolf to a man, and two of his major political books are entitled with the name of a biblical monster, Leviathan and Behemoth. Did Hobbes mean that political problems emerge from a natural violence of men and that the political solution to these problems must be found in sovereign violence? This contribution tries to demonstrate that these references do not outline any (...)
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  60.  3
    Lucretius and Monsters.Vittorio Morfino - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):139-151.
    In this paper, I analyse the problem of monstrosity as a key point of Lucretius’s theory through the opposite interpretations of Bergson and Canguilhem. According to Canguilhem, Lucretius’s philosophy can be described as follows: before the constitution of the ‘pacts of the nature,’ forms proliferate in the kingdom of Chaos. Following the pacts, the Kingdom of the form and of the Cosmos is established. Following Bergson, on the contrary, Lucretius’s pacts of nature represent the ‘kingdom of necessity’ and the ‘eternal (...)
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  61. Governed as It Were by Chance.Susan Ruddick - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):89-105.
    In this paper I explore this question of the ways we might form enabling assemblages with non-human others, by returning to Spinoza’s theory of the composite individual. The challenge, as I see it, is less that of a need to move beyond a romanticized view of Nature as a harmonious whole, Nature as a perpetual threat, or Nature as motivated by a final cause. The problem that confronts us, rather, is a problem of composition—which Nature do we ally with, what (...)
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  62.  2
    Phenomenology Rediviva.Thomas Sheehan - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):223-235.
    Steven Crowell’s new book is a wake-up call for phenomenology in general and for Heidegger studies in particular. This article focuses on Crowell’s robust reinstatement of the phenomenological reduction and the transcendental reduction in Heidegger’s work.
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  63. Werewolves in the Immunitary Paradigm.Andrea Torrano - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):153-173.
    This article problematizes the political category of the monster in Hobbes’s thought from a biopolitical perspective. Even though political thought has been traditionally focused on Leviathan’s figure as a political monster, here we pay particular attention to the maxim homo homini lupus, which can be identified with the werewolf. This figure allows us on the one hand, to show how the wolf becomes man with the creation of the State, and on the other hand, to show how there is a (...)
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  64.  2
    From the Soul.Georgios Tsagdis - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):7-24.
    The essay examines the articulation of the figure of the beast in Plato’s thought on the city and soul, in the Republic and other dialogues. The constitutive correspondence or homology of the city and soul comprises Platonic psycho-politics, a space defined by the thērion: monster and animal at once. The thērion operates within the tripartite division of the soul and the tripartite division of the city. Its various figurations, from wolf to hydra, seem to constrict this figure to the margins (...)
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