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  1.  2
    From the Dialectics of Recognition to Common Humanity.Konrad Banicki - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):19-21.
    Among the many strengths of the article by Lorenzo Gilardi and Giovanni Stanghellini one can find its open-ended character most directly reflected by the fact that these are "questions for further research," rather than a set of definitive theses, that are provided as concluding remarks. But it is not the mere occurrence of such a setting that is crucial. After all, even if somewhat atypical, the latter does happen to be used in scholarly literature. What makes the open-endedness of the (...)
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  2.  3
    Schizophrenia as a Transformative Evaluative Concept: Perspectives on the Psychiatric Significance of the Personal Self in the Ethics of Recognition.Anna Bergqvist - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):23-26.
    Psychiatric diagnosis serves many functions in the struggle for recognition, such as access to public mental health systems and legal compensation, but it is not necessarily well-equipped for the task of self-understanding and reconfiguration of personal values in the recovery process – and the likelihood of optimal outcome that is geared to the individual person's quality of life. Call this the transformative dimension of recognition in the complex journey from diagnosis to therapeutic empathy in the doctor–patient relationship.Patients who are diagnosed (...)
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  3.  5
    From Diagnosis to Therapeutic Empathy: A Journey Into Recognition.Francesca Brencio - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):11-13.
    Conceptually, recognition claims a cardinal role in many prominent philosophical theories. Kant, in the Critique of Pure Reason, uses the German word Rekognition—a term that in many ways has no antecedent in prior tradition—to signify the identification, the grasping of, a unified meaning through thought. However, it is through Hegel that a substantial step in practical philosophy is taken, and recognition is put into dialogue with self-consciousness and freedom. Hegel uses the German word Anerkennung, in the period of Jena Realphilosophie, (...)
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  4.  1
    The Human Need for Recognition.Elizabeth Flanagan - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):27-29.
    How lovely to see an article co-authored by a person with schizophrenia and his psychiatrist! For hundreds of years, the perspectives of people receiving services was never published in medical/psychiatric journals. Then, some journals had a special section for "voices of lived experience" where people receiving services could write short, personal pieces—often they told dark and negative stories about all the pain they have experienced. Later, people with lived experience were on research teams and people with mental health challenges would (...)
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  5.  2
    Curing Psychiatry's Schizophrenia: A Commentary in Values-Based PHD Mental Health Practice.K. W. M. Fulford - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):15-17.
    From the perspective of values-based practice, there is much of interest in Lorenzo Gilardi and Giovanni Stanghellini's "I am a Schizophrenic." Their dialogue exhibits many of the key elements of VBP, it exemplifies the particular challenges presented by VBP in mental health, it illustrates the power of phenomenology in meeting these challenges, and it points by extension to an insight into contemporary psychiatry's professional identity as a medical profession.VBP is a resource for working with values—with what matters or is important (...)
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  6.  1
    I Am Schizophrenic, Believe It or Not! A Dialogue About the Importance of Recognition.Lorenzo Gilardi & Giovanni Stanghellini - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):1-10.
    We are glad to acknowledge the wide spectrum of topics posited by our commentators and at the same time the recognition of the thematic issue of our project: that the mentally ill is still a person, and that this humane dimension of his existence must be brought to the fore in psychopathological studies and kept always in the fore in the therapeutic process.We are also glad to have encountered appreciation for the fact that long gone is the time when the (...)
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  7.  4
    Anorexia: That Body I Am-With.Drew Leder - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):59-61.
    Lucy Osler's piece, "Controlling the noise: A phenomenological account of Anorexia Nervosa and the threatening body," lays out an important new interpretation of anorexia. Anorexia Nervosa is no longer viewed as primarily a perceptual distortion of body-image, an obsession with thinness, or an attempt to dematerialize—to free the subject from its inert thing-like body. Rather, the body itself, and the visceral body in particular, takes on a "voice" which the anorexic experiences as demanding and threatening. Anorexic monitoring and self-starvation beckons (...)
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  8.  3
    Anorexia Nervosa, the Visceral Body, and the Sense of Ownership.Michelle Maiese - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):63-65.
    In this insightful and well-argued article, Osler aims to provide a more fine-grained, phenomenological account of anorectic bodily experience. She notes that although anorexia nervosa often is understood in terms of a distorted body image, this approach does not exhaustively or accurately reflect many subjects' bodily experiences, and also unduly privileges a third-person perspective over first-person accounts. In addition, focusing primarily on body image gives rise to the impression that AN is a form of radical dieting gone wrong as a (...)
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  9.  5
    Key Concept: Loneliness.Valeria Motta - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):71-81.
  10.  1
    Madness, Moral Agency, and Recovery.Neely Myers - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):31-34.
    All the world's a stage,/And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts.This piece, co-authored by a doctor and patient in dialogue with one another, points to the promise of prioritizing moral agency in clinical interactions and how this can promote recovery. This response will consider the broader social, philosophical and clinical context of madness in the United States. It will also signal the relevance of this (...)
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  11. Controlling the Noise: A Phenomenological Account of Anorexia Nervosa and the Threatening Body.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):41-58.
    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a complex disorder characterised by self-starvation, an act of self-destruction. It is often described as a disorder marked by paradoxes and, despite extensive research attention, is still not well understood. Much AN research focuses upon the distorted body image that individuals with AN supposedly experience. However, based upon reports from individuals describing their own experience of AN, I argue that their bodily experience is much more complex than this focus might lead us to believe. Such research (...)
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  12.  48
    (Un)Wanted Feelings in Anorexia Nervosa: Making the Visceral Body Mine Again.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (1):67-69.
    In my article "Controlling the noise," I present a phenomenological investigation of bodily experience in anorexia nervosa. Turning to descriptions of those who have suffered from AN, which repeatedly detail the experience of finding their bodies threatening, out of control and noisy, I suggest that the phenomenological conceptions of body-as-object, body-as-subject and visceral body can help us unpack the complex bodily experience of AN throughout its various stages. My claim is that self-starvation is enacted by a bodily-subject who wishes to (...)
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