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  1.  1
    Narrative Research and Service User/Survivor Stories: A New Frontier for Research Ethics?Sarah Carr - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):233-236.
    Russo suggests that the personal narratives of those who have experienced mental and emotional distress now constitute a diverse and dispersed, nonetheless considerable, body of knowledge that is of interest to non–user/survivor researchers. The issues she raises about the potential use of that knowledge pose practical and ethical challenges to both user/survivor researchers and those from other research traditions. On reading this paper, I became conscious of my own work, where I have explored my personal experiences in the context of (...)
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  2. Othering and its Guises.Molly Carroll - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):253-256.
    Flick Grey discusses three main processes of benevolent othering: Claims to ownership of territory, claims to superiority, and claims to authorship. The claim to ownership of territory is explored partly through the concept of ‘domestication’ within co-production and a benevolence contingent upon the harmlessness and usefulness of the other. This claim supports the claim to superiority, the ‘giving being’ who is in a position to ‘give’ opportunities for ‘rehabilitative identities’ within a stigmaphobic, normative world view claiming others as external and (...)
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  3. The Psychiatric Hegemon and the Limits of Resistance.Bruce M. Z. Cohen - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):301-303.
    To consider power as not only the direct physical oppression of others, but as a production of authority through discursive knowledge and a claimed ‘expertise’ of the world, has been one of Foucault’s great legacies to critical work on mental health and illness. As arbiters of the ‘truth’ on what is and what is not mental pathology, I agree with Swerdfager that the privileged knowledge of the mental health professions and the consequential marginalization of other forms of knowledge on distress (...)
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  4.  1
    Can We Co-Produce Reality, Normality, and a World That has Meaning for All?David Crepaz-Keay - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):313-321.
    The world of mental health and madness explored in this issue can read like a series of conflicts, of stark choices between alternatives which appear mutually exclusive and often imply, “I am right, you are wrong” : Ill/well, mad/sane, biomedical/psychosocial, local/global, expert/patient, individual/collective, science/anecdote, stigmaphobic/stigmaphilic, insight/delusion, normal/abnormal, privileged/marginalized, and plenty more besides. When those of us who have been diagnosed mentally ill fall on the wrong side of most of those divides and our experience and knowledge is invalidated, psychiatry’s expertise (...)
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  5. Ethical and Political Implications of the Turn to Stories in Suicide Prevention.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):265-276.
    One of the distinguishing features of the ‘narrative turn’ in bioethics has been the question of authorship. For bioethicists and clinicians worried about the distorting and diminishing effects of an increasingly objective, dualistic, and value-free medicine, narrative has played a leading role in establishing the importance of patients’ stories to the therapeutic endeavor while calling attention to the inadequacies of biomedicine. Narrative is seen as a way of ceding patients the moral authority to tell their stories, while at the same (...)
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  6.  1
    Stories of Suicide and Social Justice.Scott J. Fitzpatrick - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):285-287.
    R. Srivatsan’s view of suicide as a historically specific event enfolded with meaning and Clare Shaw’s thoughtful elucidation of the transformative power of personal stories attest to the complexity and challenge of conducting research into the meanings and functions of narratives of suicide both methodologically and ethically. Because one of the aims of my original article was to bring narrative theories and methods to bear on issues relating to the ethical and political aspects of personal narrative within the practice of (...)
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  7.  1
    Fanon, Photography, and the Limits of Social Marketing Campaigns.Errol Francis - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):257-260.
    Flick Grey interrogates the mental health discourse around anti-stigma, recovery, consumer participation, and co-production in relation to a larger discursive context around othering and seeks to question how much they challenge existing power relations. Grey approaches this question through an analysis of a billboard campaign that was mounted in 2008 by Mind in Australia, and asks us to look beyond the apparently positive representations of mental health service users and modes of involving them and to situate such strategies within a (...)
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  8.  1
    Benevolent Othering: Speaking Positively About Mental Health Service Users.Flick Grey - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):241-251.
    For a period of several weeks in 2008, Mind Australia, a large government-funded, community-managed mental health organization, displayed massive banners and billboards, saturating the advertising spaces of Southern Cross Station, the main interstate and regional train and bus interchange in Melbourne. During this period, I passed through Southern Cross Station a number of times on my way to visit a friend in the country; whether I wanted to engage with these texts or not, I was unable to avoid them.On the (...)
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  9. Dialogue with Others.Flick Grey - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):261-264.
    Before engaging with the content of the responses from Carroll and Francis, I want to acknowledge what a pleasure it is to be in dialogue with others who are engaged both politically and intellectually in this domain. I understand robust dialogue to be part of what is needed to humanize our collective responses to emotional distress, beyond benevolent othering. Dialogic spaces—in which dialogue is generated and encouraged, and otherness is respected, without conditions —offer an alternative beyond benevolent othering. Examples of (...)
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  10.  1
    Cross-Cultural Psychiatry and the User/Survivor Movement in the Context of Global Mental Health.Sumeet Jain - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):305-308.
    In ‘Theorizing resistance: Foucault, cross-cultural psychiatry and the user/survivor movement,’ Swerdfager develops a rich argument about the relationship between user/survivor voices, cross-cultural psychiatry, and the emerging discipline of global mental health. The paper questions the future directions of cross-cultural psychiatry in the era of GMH, and discusses the implications for user/survivor voices. This commentary engages with Swerdfager, focusing on the historical development of cross-cultural psychiatry and the discipline’s evolving relationship with GMH, concluding with a brief discussion of recent developments with (...)
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  11. Unsettling Disciplines: Madness, Identity, Research, Knowledge.Jayasree Kalathil & Nev Jones - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):183-188.
    When invited to edit a special issue of Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology on the theme ‘critical underpinnings of user/survivor research and co-production,’ our initial goal was to foreground explicit discussions of the philosophical and critical theory claims that undergird intellectual and political interventions into research and knowledge production led by, involving, or, in one way or another, ‘featuring’ the work of mental health service users and survivors. From our specific locations and backgrounds, we were aware of, engaged with and contributed (...)
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  12. Heterogeneities of Experience, Positionality, and Method in User/Survivor Research.Timothy Kelly - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):229-232.
    Jasna Russo argues powerfully for survivor-controlled narrative research as a counterpoint to ‘conventional narrative research,’ in which a clear dichotomy obtains between the researcher who interprets and the participant whose narrative is interpreted. Russo calls us to an ethic of engagement and a focus on dialogic relationships within the research process as a way to disrupt the potential for ‘epistemic violence’ in conventional narrative research, and toward the development of a survivor owned ‘model of madness.’ Herein I extend the discussion (...)
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  13. Experience as 'Expert' Knowledge: A Critical Understanding of Survivor Research in Mental Health.Bindhulakshmi Pattadath - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):203-205.
    Voronka critically analyzes the risk of strategic essentialism while considering ‘lived experience’ as expert knowledge. Although strategic essentialism seems to be a useful category to create political solidarity among a marginalized group, it also holds the risk of essentializing experiences, and thus works against the same premises from where critical questions against dominant knowledge systems begin. While recognizing this risk, Voronka also discusses its contextual usage while dealing with a constituency—the survivors of the mental health system—that is fragile. In this (...)
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  14. Experience, Madness Theory, and Politics.Rose Diana - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):207-210.
    In this commentary, I would like to do three things: First, reflect on Voronka’s engagement with the critique of experience as a foundational concept and her answers to this; second, comment on how we, as both activists and user/survivor researchers, engage with other critical discourses emerging from excluded groups; and finally, offer some of my own perspectives and history as a user/survivor researcher and activist in the United Kingdom to illustrate the first two points.I agree with much of what Voronka (...)
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  15. In Dialogue with Conventional Narrative Research in Psychiatry and Mental Health.Jasna Russo - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):215-228.
    First-person accounts of people labeled mad have become an object of increasing interest for nonsurvivor scholars with backgrounds in psychology and psychiatry. In the early stages of my PhD research, I set out to gain a deeper understanding of this expanding body of academic work in the hope of better situating my own project. My PhD explores the possibility of a model of madness collectively developed by the direct owners of the experiences in question. Although a detailed description of that (...)
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  16. Establishing First-Person Knowledge of Madness: Must This Undertaking Elide Our Differences?Jasna Russo - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):237-240.
    It is encouraging that, in their commentaries, Sarah Carr and Timothy Kelly do not bring the discussion back to the conventional treatment of personal narratives in psychiatry and mental health, but rather take the ideas presented in my paper forward. We seem to agree about the need to disrupt the ultimate interpretative authority of the researcher. This is the point from which both commentaries depart, taking off in their own directions through the thorny questions of how—and indeed whether—any of this (...)
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  17. Telling Stories.Clare Shaw - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):277-279.
    I am a writer and an educationalist: a poet, an author, a trainer, and an activist. For the last 15 years, I have authored papers and books, delivered training c ourses, and spoken to staff and service users in services from prisons to community projects. Although my work is informed by many sources of knowledge, my own experiences of suicidality and self-injury are at its core.The invitation to respond to Fitzpatrick’s article included the specification that it must be ‘academically rigorous.’ (...)
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  18. Responding to Suicide.R. Srivatsan - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):281-284.
    Scott Fitzpatrick covers the terrain spanning suicide prevention efforts and survivor narratives. He sets up a binary with one pole as biomedical perspectives on suicide, immediately judged as inadequate, and then seeks to examine at the opposite pole, the texture, history, and policy drivers of the current turn toward survivor narratives. He argues that privileging one specific type of recovery narrative, that is, self- formation, aligns the discourse of suicide narratives to an overall liberal policy orientation of suicide prevention and (...)
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  19. Theorizing Resistance: Foucault, Cross-Cultural Psychiatry, and the User/Survivor Movement.Thomas Swerdfager - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):289-299.
    This paper draws from the work of Michel Foucault to understand how the user/survivor movement exists within the context of a political mental health services apparatus. Such an analysis puts power at the center of mental health, and highlights the way in which specific relations of power—between the psychiatrist and patient,1 for example—work to produce discourse, which in turn works to reproduce these same relations of power. The first section of the paper briefly discusses how, for Foucault, psychiatry is a (...)
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  20. Politics and Mental Health.Thomas Swerdfager - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):309-311.
    In response to my positioning of both cross-cultural psychiatry and the user/survivor movement as alternatives to dominant mental health discourses, Cohen importantly points out that, although such resistance to psychiatric knowledge has both spread and increased, it should be acknowledged that:[W]ith the proliferation in categories of mental illness and the further infiltration of the psychiatric discourse into everyday life, the hegemony of psychiatric knowledge is probably more powerful and pervasive currently than at any previous point in the profession’s history.Elaborating on (...)
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  21. Disciplines, Difference, and Representational Authority: Making Moves Through Inclusionary Practices.Voronka Jijian - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):211-214.
    Pattadath and Rose, in their thoughtful responses, create room for textual dialogue by making connections and thinking about madness, lived experience, and research and knowledge production in other contexts. I am grateful for this engagement, and the opportunity to clarify my own thoughts, as well as generate new ones.Rose makes crucial points about the relative silence in many critical fields outside of Disability and Mad Studies and their “probably unknowing refusal to see madness as political”. This is often the case, (...)
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  22.  2
    The Politics of 'People with Lived Experience' Experiential Authority and the Risks of Strategic Essentialism.Jijian Voronka - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (3):189-201.
    This paper explores the implications that arise when those of us with experiences of distress/mental health system encounters deploy lived experience as expertise to produce research. In recent years, some mental health service and research systems have conceded to disability rights demands of ‘nothing about us without us,’ and slowly, select people with direct contact with psychiatric systems and experiences of distress have been incorporated as experts by experience into mental health assemblages. In my own professional encounters, I have largely (...)
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