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  1.  4
    Narcissism A Focal Point for Examining the Interrelatedness of Psychology and Philosophy.Lydia Amir - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):169-172.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Narcissism A Focal Point for Examining the Interrelatedness of Psychology and PhilosophyLydia Amir, PhD (bio)In a groundbreaking article, Aleksandar Fatic challenges the view that mental health is to be dissociated from morality or ethics. His argument targets cluster B personality disorders, such as Borderline and Narcissistic Personality Disorders, but focuses mainly on narcissistic disorders, whether diagnosed or not. Although these persons are not exempt of moral and legal responsibility, (...)
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  2.  5
    Critical Psychiatry, Mental Health, and Collective Liberation.Robert Chapman - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):129-131.
    In each of their respective commentaries Dr. Steingard (2023) and Dr. Jones (2023) largely agree with the core argument I outline in ‘A Critique of Critical Psychiatry.’ In that critique, I sought to show how and why Szaszian critical psychiatry or psychology will always be incompatible with collective liberation. I am heartened by their agreement, not least because both Steingard and Jones have been prominent critics of psychiatry themselves. I am also grateful that they each raise important questions that draw (...)
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  3.  26
    A Critique of Critical Psychiatry.Robert Chapman - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):103-119.
    The contemporary form of critical psychiatry and psychology focused on here follows Thomas Szasz in arguing that many of the concepts and practices of psychiatry are unscientific, value-laden, and epistemically violent. These claims are based on what I call the ‘comparativist’ critique, referred to as such since the argument relies on comparing psychiatry to what is taken to be a comparatively objective and useful somatic medicine. Here I adopt a Sedgwickian constructivist approach to illness and disability more generally to argue (...)
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  4.  11
    Narcissism as a Moral Incompetence.Aleksandar Fatic - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):159-167.
    Abstract:In this paper, I suggest that the moral incompetence in narcissism is associated with a particular type of emotional incompetence, namely the incompetence to experience the moral emotions, such as empathy, solidarity, loyalty, or love. I then move on to discussing the ethical ramifications of this incompetence, primarily from the point of view of sentimentalist ethics, and conclude that emotional incompetence does not in fact reduce the moral responsibility of a narcissist person, whether diagnosed with Narcissistic Personality Disorder or not. (...)
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  5.  5
    Why Narcissists Are Morally Responsible.Aleksandar Fatic - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):177-180.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Why Narcissists Are Morally ResponsibleAleksandar Fatic, PhDIn his insightful commentary of ‘Narcissism as a moral incompetence,’ Professor Pies proposes several principal objections to my line of argument. First, Pies mentions that I embrace a Platonic essentialism and a ‘binary’ view of narcissism, whilst in fact narcissistic traits present themselves in degrees, within a continuum of pathology.Let us clarify the meaning of essentialism. When applied to the phenomenology of narcissism, (...)
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  6. Epistemic style in OCD.Carolina Flores - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):147-150.
    Commentary on Pablo Hubacher Haerle’s paper “Is OCD Epistemically Irrational?”. I argue for expanding our assessment of rationality in OCD by considering a wider range of epistemic parameters and how they fit together.
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  7. Is OCD Epistemically Irrational?Pablo Hubacher Haerle - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):133-146.
    It’s a common assumption in psychiatry and psychotherapy that mental health conditions are marked out by some form of epistemic irrationality. With respect to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the mainstream view is that OCD causes irrational beliefs. Recently, however, this ‘doxastic view’ has been criticized from a theoretical and empirical perspective. Instead a more promising ‘zetetic view’ has been proposed which locates the epistemic irrationality of OCD not in irrational beliefs, but in the senseless inquiries it prompts. Yet, in this paper (...)
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  8.  78
    The Rational and the Sane.Pablo Hubacher Haerle - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):155-158.
    “But surely if it's not irrational, it can’t be OCD!” my friend exclaimed, when I told them about the paper Carolina Flores and Brent Kious provided their excellent comments for. In all fairness, my friend is not working in philosophy, or psychiatry, or in psychology. Still, I take their sentiment to be expressive of a widely held view: if you have a certain mental illness, then you must be irrational. Conversely, rationality guarantees mental health; the sane life is the rational (...)
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  9.  3
    Making a New World: Chapman on What We're Doing and Who is Included in the Project.Nev Jones - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):125-127.
    For at least some of us, Chapman’s Critique of Critical Psychiatry represents an in fact long overdue articulation of the moral and ethical risks (and in harm) of the Szaszian legacy in critical psychiatry. Namely, a binary framework that bluntly differentiates “somatic” from “psychological” (or, for some, socially manufactured) conditions. Chapman articulates these risks in important ways—unpacking, for example, implications vis-à-vis broader disability groups, identities tied to neurodiversity, and the transgender community, among others.Implied, but less explicitly stated, are the ways (...)
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  10. Rationality, Irrationality, and Depathologizing OCD.Brent Kious - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):151-153.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Rationality, Irrationality, and Depathologizing OCDBrent Kious, MD, PhD (bio)Pablo Hubacher argues that some persons with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) do not, in virtue of OCD itself, exhibit what he calls “epistemic irrationality,” which is a matter of violating rational norms related to belief and inquiry (Hubacher, 2023). The argument is complex and meticulous, but ultimately not persuasive. I outline the argument, show how it is unsound, and articulate its most (...)
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  11.  7
    Narcissism, Empathy and Moral Responsibility.Ronald W. Pies - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):173-176.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Narcissism, Empathy and Moral ResponsibilityRonald W. Pies, MD (bio)Professor Fatic’s timely and wide-ranging essay demonstrates how the topic of narcissism has undergone a resurgence of interest in recent decades. This may owe, in part, to the controversial claim that narcissism is on the rise in the United States, at least among American college students (Twenge & Foster, 2010). As I discuss presently, the term “narcissism” is open to many (...)
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  12. Four Ways of Going "Right" Functions in Mental Disorder.Anya Plutynski - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):181-191.
    Abstract:In this paper, I distinguish four ways in which aspects or features of mental illness may be said to be functional. I contend that discussion of teleological perspectives on mental illness has unfortunately tended to conflate these senses. The latter two senses have played important practical roles both in predicting and explaining patterns of behavior, cognition, and affective response, atnd relatedly, in developing successful interventions. I further argue that functional talk in this context is neither inconsistent with viewing some disorders (...)
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  13.  4
    Critical Psychiatry in the Context of Critical Medicine.Sandra Steingard - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):121-123.
    In “A Critique of Critical Psychiatry,” Chapman asserts that a dominant philosophical premise among many “criticals” (the label used in that paper, which I adopt here) is adherence to a Szaszian distinction between psychiatry and other branches of medicine. Chapman eloquently summarizes the problems with this perspective. Their elucidation of the complexity of non-psychiatric conditions, which are not nearly as well delineated as Szasz and his followers would have one believe, is clear and compelling. The notion of comparativist critique, that (...)
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  14.  8
    The Future Is Political and Transdisciplinary.Awais Aftab - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):5-6.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Future Is Political and TransdisciplinaryAwais Aftab (bio)Philosophy, psychiatry, & psychology (PPP) is a transdisciplinary oasis, one of the few journals in mental health care that facilitate a meaningful dialogue between philosophers, psychiatrists, psychologists, and scholars from related disciplines. The fact that PPP successfully provides such a space is of no small importance, especially from my perspective as a psychiatrist. The multidisciplinary nature of the undertaking has been a (...)
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  15.  13
    Narrative Formulation Revisited: On Seeing the Person in Mental Health Recovery.Anna Bergqvist - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):7-8.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Narrative Formulation RevisitedOn Seeing the Person in Mental Health RecoveryAnna Bergqvist (bio)The use of narrative in mental health contexts models consciousness as something necessarily embodied, as already part of the world, in an inherently value-laden and perspectival way. As such narrative presents a powerful tool for critical reassessment and reevaluation of preconceived ideas in relating to difficult concepts in clinical interactions.Narrative structures can reveal psychological differences between persons in (...)
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  16.  17
    Vulnerabilization and De-pathologization: Two Philosophical Suggestions.Havi Carel - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):73-76.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Vulnerabilization and De-pathologizationTwo Philosophical SuggestionsHavi Carel, PhD (bio)Alastair Morgan raises useful and interesting philosophical critiques of the 'power-threat-meaning' framework proposed by Johnstone et al. (2018). In what follows I make two suggestions that may clarify some aspects of the debate. First, to broaden the notion of threat: we can think more broadly about adverse life events as the source of mental suffering by broadening the notion of threat to (...)
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  17.  27
    What Makes a Disorder 'Mental'? A Practical Treatment of Psychiatric Disorder.Joseph Gough - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):15-35.
    Abstract:The titular question, of what makes a disorder 'mental,' has an obvious answer: mental disorders are disorders of the mind. I argue that this is not so, before proposing a positive theory of what makes a disorder 'mental,' that what makes a disorder 'mental' is its relationship to psychiatry. The overall thrust of my argument is that mental disorder is mental in name only—to have a mental disorder is not to have a disorder of the mind. Instead, mental disorder is (...)
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  18.  7
    The Debate about Assisted Dying for Persons with Mental Disorders: An Essential Role for Philosophy.Mona Gupta - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):9-10.
    In 20141 and 2016,2 respectively, Québec and Canada adopted legislation permitting medical assistance in dying (MAID). In this context, the question of whether persons with mental disorders should be able to access MAID has received considerable scrutiny.Over the last 5 years, I have been involved in the academic and policy debates about assisted dying for persons with mental disorders. Policymakers and clinicians alike demand that public policy be based on 'evidence' by which they tend to mean empirical, usually quantitative, data. (...)
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  19.  8
    From Clinical Encounter to Knowledge Claims: Epistemological Guidelines for Case Studies in Psychotherapy.Greta Kaluzeviciute & Joshua Moreton - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):79-98.
    Abstract:In the fields of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy, case study researchers rarely justify their knowledge claims on formal epistemological grounds. This poses several issues to the case study method. First, without articulating the standards by which our knowledge is being justified, we are potentially enabling the criticism that case studies are mere anecdotal reports and should not be treated as forms of evidence. Second, without the guidance of wider epistemological standards for case study research, we risk falling into arbitrary justifications of (...)
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  20.  66
    Power, Threat, Meaning Framework: A Philosophical Critique.Alastair Morgan - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):53-67.
    Abstract:In this paper, I offer a philosophical critique of the Power Threat Meaning Framework (PTMF). This framework was launched in the UK in January 2018 as a non-pathologizing way of understanding mental distress. It argues that those experiences diagnosed as mental illnesses are better understood as meaning-based threat responses to the negative operation of power. My critique consists of three parts. First, the PTMF argues that it is opposed to a concept of mental distress as illness. However, the PTMF unfolds (...)
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  21.  5
    The Remnants of Sense.Alastair Morgan - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):77-78.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Remnants of SenseAlastair Morgan, PhD (bio)In an interview outlining her approach to understanding mental distress, Lucy Johnstone states that when faced with ostensibly bizarre, irrational or distressing experiences:[T]he guiding principle of "At some level it all makes sense" applies. In fact, I can't immediately think of anyone I've worked with for whom it did not, in the end, turn out to be true.1The two commentaries on my paper (...)
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  22.  21
    The 'Power Threat Meaning Framework': Yet Another Master Narrative?Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):69-72.
    Proposing narratives that reflect our values and address what we believe to be, and what in fact in this case are, valid concerns is no doubt an attractive venture. But good intentions are not enough, and often it is careful analysis that shows why this is the case. Alastair Morgan's (2023) essay Power, Threat, Meaning Framework: A Philosophical Critique is a bright example of philosophy-in-action; it demonstrates, to use a popular expression, that the road to hell is paved with good (...)
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  23.  5
    Introduction to the 30th Anniversary Issue of Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology.John Z. Sadler - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):1-2.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Introduction to the 30th Anniversary Issue of Philosophy, Psychiatry, & PsychologyJohn Z. Sadler (bio)This issue marks the 30th anniversary of Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology (PPP). All of us at the journal are grateful to our authors, readers, editors, and publishers for enabling this landmark. To commemorate this event, I invited our Founding Editor and Chair of the Advisory Board, K.W.M. "Bill" Fulford to write a brief essay, along with (...)
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  24.  9
    Compelling Reasons.Tim Thornton - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):11-12.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Compelling ReasonsTim Thornton, MA, MPhil, PhD, DLitt (bio)There are many compelling reasons to have an interest in the philosophy of/and psychiatry. In 1994, when persuaded by Bill Fulford to walk down the corridor at Warwick University to join in his teaching of what seemed a newly developing subject—against my protestations that I knew nothing about mental health care—my main interest was in the irreducibility of meaning to the 'realm (...)
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  25.  10
    Hermeneutics, Neuroscience and Psychiatry.Michael T. H. Wong - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (1):13-14.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Hermeneutics, Neuroscience and PsychiatryMichael T. H. Wong, MBBS, MD, MA, MDiv, PhD, FRCPsych, FRANZCP, FHKAM (bio)Hermeneutic practice in mental health has been a theme in Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology (PPP) since its very beginnings. In this essay I argue that hermeneutics, the theory and practice of interpretation, promotes therapeutic interaction between mental health professionals, patients and their family.Why does this patient present in such a way at this particular (...)
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