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  1.  7
    Bearing the Brunt of Structural Inequality: Ontological Labor in the Academy.Ruthanne Crapo, Ann J. Cahill & Melissa Jacquart - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1).
    Empirical data show that members of underrepresented and historically marginalized groups in academia undertake many forms of undervalued or unnoticed labor. While the data help to identify that this labor exists, they do not provide a thick description of what the experience is like, nor do they offer a framework for understanding the different kinds of invisible labor that are being undertaken. We identify and analyze a distinct, undervalued, and invisible labor that the data have left unnamed and unmeasured: ontological (...)
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  2.  5
    Care Workers on Strike.Hailey Huget - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1).
    This paper investigates a moral conflict that care workers, defined as workers who care for dependent others, confront when they go on strike. Care workers who confront decisions about whether to go on strike are, in my analysis, caught between impossible options: Should they prioritize the needs of those who are currently dependent upon them, and forego striking, or prioritize their long-term ability to provide the best possible care, and partake in strikes? I argue that care workers who confront these (...)
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  3.  3
    Women’s Work and Assets: Considering Property Ownership From a Transnational Feminist Perspective.Johanna C. Luttrell - 2020 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1).
    Development literature on global gender empowerment devotes much attention to employment, a code word for the inclusion of women’s labor in the global market. Recent work in transnational feminisms shows that the emphasis on employment over assets may not prevent exploitation of labor and perpetuity of poverty. This paper first highlights research on how women are increasingly taking on too much responsibility, working in a confluence of survival-oriented activities that undermine their own well-being. I also address how women are increasingly (...)
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