Year:

  1.  4
    When Humour Questions Taboo.Philipp Heidepeter & Ursula Reutner - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):138-166.
    The article examines the ways in which humour twists regular euphemism use. Based on the classical fields of euphemisms anchored in religion, aesthetics, social politics, and amorality, it identifies the characteristics of their twisted variants with a humorous component: playing-with-fire euphemisms that jocosely provoke supernatural forces, innuendo euphemisms that entertain, mocking euphemisms that make fun of others in a teasing or demeaning way, and idealistic euphemisms that uncover obfuscating language and negative realities. Using English, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish (...)
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  2.  1
    Circumnavigating Taboos.Melanie Keller, Philipp Striedl, Daniel Biro, Johanna Holzer & Kate Burridge - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):5-24.
    This article elaborates on Wolfgang Schulze’s keynote speech of the same title at the 26th LIPP Symposium in Munich in 2019. It is based on the slides from his talk and various teaching materials, of which some figures have been translated from German to English before their inclusion in this article. While this article’s foundation rests on Schulze’s theories and research, we have done our best to build upon his work; direct quotes and key concepts of his will be cited (...)
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  3.  1
    Sex, Death & Politics – Taboos in Language.Melanie Keller, Philipp Striedl, Daniel Biro, Johanna Holzer & Benjamin Weber - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):1-4.
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  4.  6
    The Sound of Taboo.Robin Vallery & Maarten Lemmens - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):87-137.
    Swear words of English and French, both real and fictional ones, significantly tend to contain the least sonorous consonants, compared to the rest of the lexicon. What can explain the overrepresentation of such sounds among swear words? This might be a case of sound symbolism, when sounds are unconsciously associated with a meaning. We examine the pragmatic vs. semantic nature of the meaning involved, as well as two explanations in terms of iconicity. This unusual sound-meaning pairing would involve an emotional-contextual, (...)
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  5.  2
    Borrowing and the Historical LGBTQ Lexicon.Nicholas Lo Vecchio - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):167-192.
    Unlike most areas involving taboo, where language-internal innovations tend to dominate, homosexuality is characterized by a basic international vocabulary shared across multiple languages, notably English, French, Italian, Spanish and German. Historically, the lexis of nonnormative gender identity has shared space with that of sexual orientation. This lexicon includes the following series of internationalisms: sodomite, bugger, bardash, berdache, tribade, pederast, sapphist, lesbian, uranist, invert, homosexual, bisexual, trans, gay, queer. This common terminology has resulted from language contact in a broad sense, and (...)
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  6.  2
    Tongan Honorifics and Their Underlying Concepts of Mana and Tapu.Svenja Völkel - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):25-56.
    The Tongan language has honorific registers, called a ‘language of respect’. These are two limited sets of lexemes used to refer to people of chiefly and kingly rank and thus honour the societal stratification. Anthropological-linguistic research reveals that these honorifics are a tapu-motivated linguistic practice. The Polynesian concept of tapu means that entities with more mana such as persons of higher rank and their personal belongings are ‘sacred’, and it is ‘forbidden’ to get in physical touch with them. The respectful (...)
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