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  1.  2
    Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas on What is “Better-Known” in Natural Science.John H. Boyer & Daniel C. Wagner - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93:199-225.
    Aristotelian commenters have long noted an apparent contradiction between what Aristotle says in Posterior Analytics I.2 and Physics I.1 about how we obtain first principles of a science. At Posterior 71b35–72a6, Aristotle states that what is most universal (καθόλου) is better-known by nature and initially less-known to us, while the particular (καθ’ ἕκαστον) is initially better-known to us, but less-known by nature. At Physics 184a21-30, however, Aristotle states that we move from what is better-known to us, which is universal (καθόλου), (...)
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  2.  40
    Perennial Symmetry Arguments: Aristotle’s Heavenly Cosmology and Noether’s First Theorem.Ryan Michael Miller - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93.
    Attempts to find perennial elements in Aristotle’s cosmology are doomed to failure because his distinction of sub- and supra-lunary realms no longer holds. More fruitful approaches to the contemporary importance of Aristotelian cosmology must focus on parities of reasoning rather than content. This paper highlights the striking parallels between Aristotle’s use of symmetry arguments in cosmology and instances of Noether’s First Theorem in contemporary physics. Both observe simple motion, find symmetries in that motion, argue from those symmetries to notions of (...)
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  3.  70
    “In as Many Ways as Something is Predicated ... In That Many Ways is Something Signified to Be”: The Logic Behind Thomas Aquinas’s Predication Thesis, Esse Substantiale, and Esse in Rerum Natura.Elliot Polsky - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93:263-292.
    Thomistic commentators agree that Thomas Aquinas at least nominally allows for 'to be' (esse) to signify not only an act contrasted with essence in creatures, but also the essence itself of those creatures. Nevertheless, it is almost unheard of for any author to interpret Thomas's use of the word 'esse' as referring to essence. Against this tendency, this paper argues that Thomas's In V Metaphysics argument that every predication signifies esse provides an important instance of Thomas using esse to signify (...)
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