Aristotelica

ISSNs: 2785-4515, 2785-4515

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  1.  7
    Editorial. Aristotle across Boundaries.Silvia Fazzo, Marco Ghione & Jill Kraye - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):1-2.
    In June 2023, a group of ‘Aristotelians without Borders’ met in the splendid Villa San Remigio in Verbania, one of the beautiful premises of the University of Eastern Piedmont. Following in the footsteps of Aristotelians over the centuries, the participants were committed to the belief that engaging in dialogue has a value in itself. Our Aristotelian predecessors have collectively bequeathed to us a common language, a shared form of rationality and a grammar of thought which allow us to engage in (...)
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  2.  8
    Aristotele sull’analogia tra le facoltà cognitive degli esseri umani e degli altri animali / Aristotle on the Analogy between the Cognitive Faculties of Human Beings and Other Animals.Giuseppe Feola - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):79-108.
    In _Historia animalium_ VIII 1.588a18 ff., Aristotle describes the cognitive powers of non-human animals as sketches of human cognitive powers. According to the wording he chooses here, the cognitive powers of non-human animals are “traces” or “footprints” (ἴχνη, 588a19) of human ones. In this paper I explore the conceptual framework that lays behind this image, in order to show that it is much more than a rhetorical figure, and that Aristotle’s wording encompasses a whole articulated theory, whose details are set (...)
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  3.  4
    Aristotle on Continuity: Continuous Connection in Phys. V 3, and the Mathematical Account of Motion and Time in Phys. VI.Gottfried Heinemann - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):5-34.
    Wholes have parts, and wholes are prior to parts according to Aristotle. Aristotle’s accounts of continuity, in _Phys_. V 3 (plus sections in Metaph. Δ 6 and Ι 1) on the one hand and in _Phys_. VI on the other, are specified in terms of ways in which wholes are related to parts. The synthesis account in Phys. V 3 etc. applies primarily to bodies (in, e.g., anatomy). It indicates a variety of ways in which parts of a body are (...)
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  4.  4
    Argumentaire : Aristote au-delà des frontières / Talking Point: Aristotle across Boundaries.Jean-Marc Narbonne - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):3-4.
    Aucun auteur de l’Antiquité, peut-être, n’a permis autant qu’Aristote de mettre en contact les êtres humains entre eux malgré les frontières du temps et de l’espace, à travers les barrières des langues et de leurs traductions, des cultures, des religions et des idéologies diverses. Aucun philosophe n’aura entretenu des visées aussi universalisantes et sans frontières. C’est le cas, notamment, dans le domaine de la métaphysique, de la logique, du politique ou de la poétique. En métaphysique, le questionnement poursuivi sur l’étant (...)
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  5.  6
    Natural Selection Shadowed Forth: Aristotle’s De partibus animalium after Darwin.Peter Swallow - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):109-126.
    Until the last years of his life, Charles Darwin had actually never read Aristotle. The sole reference he makes to his naturalist forebear in _On the Origin of Species_ came in an addition to the fourth edition, published in 1866, in which he mistakenly refers to Aristotle’s summation of Empedocles’ position at _Physica_ II 8, as Aristotle’s own, and notes that ‘we see here the principle of natural selection shadowed forth’ (while disputing the specific scientific point Aristotle – though actually (...)
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  6.  6
    Discussing Natural Motion: Definition of Time and Verbal Usage in Aristotle.Monica Ugaglia - 2023 - Aristotelica 4 (4):35-78.
    Aristotle posits that time, as defined by the “number of motion in respect of before and after” (_Physics_ IV 11.219b1-2), is an inherent property of motion itself rather than a prerequisite. This implies the possibility of identifying time-independent properties of natural motions. One such critical feature, crucial to understanding the basic meaning of time, is the presence of an inherent order of before and after within motion, regardless of time. The concept of a non-temporal before and after within motion is (...)
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