Year:

  1.  2
    Norm Conflict Identification in Contracts.João Paulo Aires, Daniele Pinheiro, Vera Strube de Lima & Felipe Meneguzzi - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (4):397-428.
    The exchange of goods and services between individuals is often formalised by a contract in which the parties establish norms to define what is expected of each one. Norms use deontic statements of obligation, prohibition, and permission, which may be in conflict. The task of manually detecting norm conflicts can be time–consuming and error-prone since contracts can be vast and complex. To automate such tasks, we develop an approach to identify potential conflicts between norms. We show the effectiveness of our (...)
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  2.  9
    Ontology-Based Information Extraction for Juridical Events with Case Studies in Brazilian Legal Realm.Denis Andrei de Araujo, Sandro José Rigo & Jorge Luis Victória Barbosa - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (4):379-396.
    The number of available legal documents has presented an enormous growth in recent years, and the digital processing of such materials is prompting the necessity of systems that support the automatic relevant information extraction. This work presents a system for ontology-based information extraction from natural language texts, able to identify a set of legal events. The system is based on an innovative methodology based on domain ontology of legal events and a set of linguistic rules, integrated through inference mechanism, resulting (...)
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  3.  5
    Using Artificial Intelligence to Support Compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation.John Kingston - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (4):429-443.
    The General Data Protection Regulation is a European Union regulation that will replace the existing Data Protection Directive on 25 May 2018. The most significant change is a huge increase in the maximum fine that can be levied for breaches of the regulation. Yet fewer than half of UK companies are fully aware of GDPR—and a number of those who were preparing for it stopped doing so when the Brexit vote was announced. A last-minute rush to become compliant is therefore (...)
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  4.  5
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Machine Law.Bartosz Brożek, Jaap Hage & Bipin Indurkhya - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):251-253.
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  5.  14
    On the Legal Responsibility of Autonomous Machines.Bartosz Brożek & Marek Jakubiec - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):293-304.
    The paper concerns the problem of the legal responsibility of autonomous machines. In our opinion it boils down to the question of whether such machines can be seen as real agents through the prism of folk-psychology. We argue that autonomous machines cannot be granted the status of legal agents. Although this is quite possible from purely technical point of view, since the law is a conventional tool of regulating social interactions and as such can accommodate various legislative constructs, including legal (...)
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  6.  6
    Of, for, and by the People: The Legal Lacuna of Synthetic Persons.Joanna J. Bryson, Mihailis E. Diamantis & Thomas D. Grant - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):273-291.
    Conferring legal personhood on purely synthetic entities is a very real legal possibility, one under consideration presently by the European Union. We show here that such legislative action would be morally unnecessary and legally troublesome. While AI legal personhood may have some emotional or economic appeal, so do many superficially desirable hazards against which the law protects us. We review the utility and history of legal fictions of personhood, discussing salient precedents where such fictions resulted in abuse or incoherence. We (...)
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  7.  33
    The Ethical Knob: Ethically-Customisable Automated Vehicles and the Law.Giuseppe Contissa, Francesca Lagioia & Giovanni Sartor - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):365-378.
    Accidents involving autonomous vehicles raise difficult ethical dilemmas and legal issues. It has been argued that self-driving cars should be programmed to kill, that is, they should be equipped with pre-programmed approaches to the choice of what lives to sacrifice when losses are inevitable. Here we shall explore a different approach, namely, giving the user/passenger the task of deciding what ethical approach should be taken by AVs in unavoidable accident scenarios. We thus assume that AVs are equipped with what we (...)
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  8.  34
    Robot Sex and Consent: Is Consent to Sex Between a Robot and a Human Conceivable, Possible, and Desirable?Lily Frank & Sven Nyholm - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):305-323.
    The development of highly humanoid sex robots is on the technological horizon. If sex robots are integrated into the legal community as “electronic persons”, the issue of sexual consent arises, which is essential for legally and morally permissible sexual relations between human persons. This paper explores whether it is conceivable, possible, and desirable that humanoid robots should be designed such that they are capable of consenting to sex. We consider reasons for giving both “no” and “yes” answers to these three (...)
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  9.  13
    Theoretical Foundations for the Responsibility of Autonomous Agents.Jaap Hage - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):255-271.
    This article argues that it is possible to hold autonomous agents themselves, and not only their makers, users or owners, responsible for the acts of these agents. In this connection autonomous systems are computer programs that interact with the outside world without human interference. They include such systems as ‘intelligent’ weapons and self-driving cars. The argument is based on an analogy between human beings and autonomous agents and its main element asserts that if humans can be held responsible, so can, (...)
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  10.  4
    Do Androids Dream of Normative Endorsement? On the Fallibility of Artificial Moral Agents.Frodo Podschwadek - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):325-339.
    The more autonomous future artificial agents will become, the more important it seems to equip them with a capacity for moral reasoning and to make them autonomous moral agents. Some authors have even claimed that one of the aims of AI development should be to build morally praiseworthy agents. From the perspective of moral philosophy, praiseworthy moral agents, in any meaningful sense of the term, must be fully autonomous moral agents who endorse moral rules as action-guiding. They need to do (...)
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  11.  7
    On the Problem of Making Autonomous Vehicles Conform to Traffic Law.Henry Prakken - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (3):341-363.
    Autonomous vehicles are one of the most spectacular recent developments of Artificial Intelligence. Among the problems that still need to be solved before they can fully autonomously participate in traffic is the one of making their behaviour conform to the traffic laws. This paper discusses this problem by way of a case study of Dutch traffic law. First it is discussed to what extent Dutch traffic law exhibits features that are traditionally said to pose challenges for AI & Law models, (...)
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  12. HYPO's Legacy: Introduction to the Virtual Special Issue.T. J. M. Bench-Capon - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (2):205-250.
    This paper is an introduction to a virtual special issue of AI and Law exploring the legacy of the influential HYPO system of Rissland and Ashley. The papers included are: Arguments and cases: An inevitable intertwining, BankXX: Supporting legal arguments through heuristic retrieval, Modelling reasoning with precedents in a formal dialogue Game, A note on dimensions and factors, An empirical investigation of reasoning with legal cases through theory construction and application, Automatically classifying case texts and predicting outcomes, A factor-based definition (...)
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  13. On Computable Numbers with an Application to the AlanTuringproblem.C. F. Huws & J. C. Finnis - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (2):181-203.
    This paper explores the question of whether or not the law is a computable number in the sense described by Alan Turing in his 1937 paper ‘On computable numbers with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem.’ Drawing upon the legal, social, and political context of Alan Turing’s own involvement with the law following his arrest in 1952 for the criminal offence of gross indecency, the article explores the parameters of computability within the law and analyses the applicability of Turing’s computability thesis (...)
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  14. Legal Personality of Robots, Corporations, Idols and Chimpanzees: A Quest for Legitimacy.S. M. Solaiman - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (2):155-179.
    Robots are now associated with various aspects of our lives. These sophisticated machines have been increasingly used in different manufacturing industries and services sectors for decades. During this time, they have been a factor in causing significant harm to humans, prompting questions of liability. Industrial robots are presently regarded as products for liability purposes. In contrast, some commentators have proposed that robots be granted legal personality, with an overarching aim of exonerating the respective creators and users of these artefacts from (...)
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  15.  5
    Norms and Value Based Reasoning: Justifying Compliance and Violation.Trevor Bench-Capon & Sanjay Modgil - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):29-64.
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  16.  17
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Artificial Intelligence for Justice.Floris Bex, Henry Prakken, Tom van Engers & Bart Verheij - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):1-3.
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  17.  4
    Data-Centric and Logic-Based Models for Automated Legal Problem Solving.L. Karl Branting - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):5-27.
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  18.  1
    Recognizing Cited Facts and Principles in Legal Judgements.Shulayeva Olga, Siddharthan Advaith & Wyner Adam - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):107-126.
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  19. Reading Agendas Between the Lines, an Exercise.Giovanni Sileno, Alexander Boer & Tom van Engers - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):89-106.
    This work presents elements for an alternative operationalization of monitoring and diagnosis of multi-agent systems, developed in the context of compliance checking. In contrast to traditional accounts of model-based diagnosis, and most proposals concerning non-compliance, our method does not consider any commitment towards the individual unit of agency. Identity is considered to be mostly an attribute to assign responsibility, and not as the only referent to a source of intentionality. The proposed method requires as input a set of prototypical agent-roles (...)
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  20.  2
    On the Concept of Relevance in Legal Information Retrieval.van Opijnen Marc & Santos Cristiana - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):65-87.
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  21.  2
    Proof with and Without Probabilities.Bart Verheij - 2017 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 25 (1):127-154.
    Evidential reasoning is hard, and errors can lead to miscarriages of justice with serious consequences. Analytic methods for the correct handling of evidence come in different styles, typically focusing on one of three tools: arguments, scenarios or probabilities. Recent research used Bayesian networks for connecting arguments, scenarios, and probabilities. Well-known issues with Bayesian networks were encountered: More numbers are needed than are available, and there is a risk of misinterpretation of the graph underlying the Bayesian network, for instance as a (...)
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