Year:

  1. What If God Commanded Something Horrible? A Pragmatics-Based Defence of Divine Command Metaethics.Philipp Kremers - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (4):597–617.
    The objection of horrible commands claims that divine command metaethics is doomed to failure because it is committed to the extremely counterintuitive assumption that torture of innocents, rape, and murder would be morally obligatory if God commanded these acts. Morriston, Wielenberg, and Sinnott-Armstrong have argued that formulating this objection in terms of counterpossibles is particularly forceful because it cannot be simply evaded by insisting on God’s necessary perfect moral goodness. I show that divine command metaethics can be defended even against (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the Philosophy of Religion.Jack Williams - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (4):634–653.
    This article proposes a new approach to employing Maurice Merleau-Ponty's philosophy in the philosophy of religion. Rather than finding a latent theology in Merleau-Ponty – as some interpreters do – this article argues that Merleau-Ponty's later ontology can provide the basis for a philosophical anthropology which can help us understand why human beings are drawn to religion and how this is expressed in affective and ritual practice. This ontology can help us to understand the notion of freedom as it applies (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Testimony, Faith and Humility.Finlay Malcolm - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (3):466-483.
    It is sometimes claimed that faith is a virtue. To what extent faith is a virtue depends on what faith is. One construal of faith, which has been popular in both recent and historical work on faith, is that faith is a matter of taking oneself to have been spoken to by God and of trusting this purported divine testimony. In this paper, I argue that when faith is understood in this way, for faith to be virtuous then it must (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. The Secular Problem of Evil: An Essay in Analytic Existentialism.Paul Prescott - 2021 - Religious Studies 57 (1):101-119.
    The existence of evil is often held to pose philosophical problems only for theists. I argue that the existence of evil gives rise to a philosophical problem which confronts theist and atheist alike. The problem is constituted by the following claims: (1) Successful human beings (i.e., those meeting their basic prudential interests) are committed to a good-enough world; (2) the actual world is not a good-enough world (i.e., sufficient evil exists). It follows that human beings must either (3a) maintain a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Review, Paul Copan with William Lane Craig (Eds). The Kalam Cosmological Arguments, I: Philosophical Arguments for the Finitude of the Past. [REVIEW]Joshua Matthan Brown - 2021 - Religious Studies 57:372-375.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  18
    Is the Atonement Necessary or Fitting?Anne Jeffrey - 2021 - Religious Studies 57:1-9.
    In her impressive Atonement, Eleonore Stump claims that her novel Marian theory of the atonement meets a desideratum for a successful theory that Aquinas's theory does not, namely, showing that Christ's passion and death are essential to the solution to the problem of human sin. Here I suggest reasons to side with Aquinas, who says that Christ's suffering and death are not necessary, but merely a fitting way of solving the problem. If the fittingness of Christ's passion and death is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  29
    Gorazd Andrejč and Daniel H. Weiss (Eds) Interpreting Interreligious Relations with Wittgenstein (Leiden: Brill, 2019). Pp. Xiv + 243. £100.00 (Hbk). ISBN 9789004397927. [REVIEW]Robert Vinten - 2021 - Religious Studies 57.
    One of the virtues of this edited collection is the diversity contained within it. There is diversity to be found in the uses made of Wittgenstein's writings, reflecting the diversity of ways of understanding religion found in Wittgenstein's work. Andrejč, in his introduction (3), suggests that there are four dominant ways in which Wittgenstein depicts religion: the nonsensicalist, existentialist, grammaticalist and instinctivist conceptions of religion.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  2
    David Patterson, Portraits: The Hasidic Legacy of Elie Wiesel. [REVIEW]Jonathan Nassim - 2021 - Religious Studies 1 (1):1-2.
    Review of David Patterson, Portraits: The Hasidic Legacy of Elie Wiesel.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  7
    Mary, Did You Consent?Blake Hereth - 2021 - Religious Studies:1-24.
    The Christian and Islamic doctrine of the VIRGIN BIRTH claim God asexually impregnated the Virgin Mary with Jesus, Mary’s impregnation was fully consensual (VIRGIN CONSENT), and God never acts immorally (DIVINE GOODNESS). First, I show that God’s actions and Mary’s background beliefs undermine her consent by virtue of coercive incentives, Mary’s comparative powerlessness, and the generation of moral conflicts. Second, I show that God’s nondisclosure of certain reasonably relevant facts undermines Mary’s informed consent. Third, I show that a recent attempt (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Persons of the Trinity Are Themselves Triune: A Reply to Mooney.Michael Willenborg - 2021 - Religious Studies:1-8.
    Justin Mooney (2018) advances what he calls The Problem of Triunity: each divine person is God, God is triune, and yet, each of the divine persons is apparently not triune. In response, I suggest that we ought to accept that each of the divine persons is in fact triune. First, I offer a plausible analysis of the claim that God is triune; second, I show that, given that analysis, there is nothing untoward about embracing the conclusion that each divine person (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Anabaptist Two-Kingdom Dualism: Metaphysical Grounding for Non-Violence.Caleb Zimmerman - 2021 - Religious Studies.
    A non-violent position drawn from the Anabaptist tradition (‘two-kingdom dualism’) is contrasted with the Christian pacifism with which that position is commonly conflated. It is argued that two-kingdom dualism more effectively leverages the philosophical and practical features of its particularly Christian character than does Christian pacifism – and that these features may have implications beyond the philosophy of religion.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues