9 found

Year:

  1.  13
    Contractualism and the Right to Strike.David A. Borman - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):81-98.
    This paper explores the moral and legal status of the right to strike from a contractualist perspective, broadly construed. I argue that rather than attempting to ground the right to strike in the principle of association, as is commonly done in the ongoing legal debate, it ought to be understood as the assertion of a second-order moral right to self-determination within economic life. The controversy surrounding the right to strike thus reflects and depends upon a more basic question of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  10
    Group Virtues: No Great Leap Forward with Collectivism.Sean Cordell - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):43-59.
    A body of work in ethics and epistemology has advanced a collectivist view of virtues. Collectivism holds that some social groups can be subjects in themselves which can possess attributes such as agency or responsibility. Collectivism about virtues holds that virtues are among those attributes. By focusing on two different accounts, I argue that the collectivist virtue project has limited prospects. On one such interpretation of institutional virtues, virtue-like features of the social collective are explained by particular group-oriented features of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Hohfeldian Infinities: Why Not to Worry.Visa A. J. Kurki - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):137-146.
    Hillel Steiner has recently attacked the notion of inalienable rights, basing some of his arguments on the Hohfeldian analysis to show that infinite arrays of legal positions would not be associated with any inalienable rights. This essay addresses the nature of the Hohfeldian infinity: the main argument is that what Steiner claims to be an infinite regress is actually a wholly unproblematic form of infinite recursion. First, the nature of the Hohfeldian recursion is demonstrated. It is shown that infinite recursions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Fact-Sensitivity and the ‘Defining-Down’ Objection.Andrew Lister - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):117-135.
    This paper aims to clarify what it means for a normative theory to be fact-sensitive, and what might be wrong with such sensitivity, by examining the ways in which ‘justice as fairness’ depends upon facts. While much of the fact-sensitivity of Rawls’s principles consists of innocent limitations of generality, Rawls’s appeal to stability raises a legitimate worry about defining justice down in order to make ‘justice’ stable. If it should turn out that the correct principles of justice are inconsistent with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    John Hadley: Animal Property Rights: A Theory of Habitat Rights for Wild Animals.Josh Milburn - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):147-151.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  7
    The Gauthier Contract: Applicable or Not?Jeremy Neill - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):1-22.
    In a 2013 article, David Gauthier noted upon the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of Morals by Agreement that his contractarian approach to morality had found a niche among ‘some of those who remain unpersuaded by either Kantianism or utilitarianism’. In this article I will focus on Pareto optimization and I will argue that the Gauthier contract, even in spite of the article’s revisions, is still less useful for consultation purposes than Gauthier is assuming. To highlight the conceptual distance that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  4
    A Defense of the Human Right to Adequate Food.Sandra Raponi - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):99-115.
    I argue that recognizing a human right to adequate food and enforcing it as a legal right is an important way to promote and ensure sustainable food security. I consider objections that have been raised against subsistence rights and socio-economic rights, including the argument that such rights are not feasible, that they are not justiciable, and that they are too amorphous—that it is not clear what is required to fulfill these rights and by whom. I defend the right to adequate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  16
    Second Person Rules: An Alternative Approach to Second-Personal Normativity.Kevin Vallier - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):23-42.
    Stephen Darwall’s moral theory explains moral obligation by appealing to a “second-person” standpoint where persons use second-person reasons to hold one another accountable for their moral behavior. However, Darwall claims obligations obtain if and only if hypothetical persons endorse them, despite tying the second-person standpoint to our real-world moral practices. Focus on hypothetical persons renders critical elements of his account obscure. I solve this problem by distinguishing two ideas quietly working in tandem, the hypothetical endorsement of moral norms and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  10
    Sharing in a Common Life: People with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties.John Vorhaus - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (1):61-79.
    There is a view that what we owe to other people is explained by the fact that they are human beings who share in a common human life. There are many ways of construing this explanatory idea, and I explore a few of these here; the aim is to look for constructions that contribute to an understanding of what we owe to people with profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities. In exploring the idea of sharing in a common life (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues