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  1.  8
    The Space of the Lacerated Subject: Architecture And Abjectiion.Sean Akahane-Bryen & Chris L. Smith - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    In Powers of Horror,1 the psychoanalyst Julia Kristeva presented the first explicit, elaborated theory of ‘abjection,’ which she defines as the casting off of that which is not of one’s “clean and proper”2 self. According to Kristeva, abjection is a demarcating impulse which establishes the basis of all object relations, and is operative in the Lacanian narrative of subject formation in early childhood via object differentiation. Abjection continues to operate post-Oedipally to prevent the dissolution of the subject by repressing identification (...)
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  2.  17
    Architecture as Participation in the World: Merleau-Ponty, Wölfflin, and the Bodily Experience of the Built Environment.Brian Irwin - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    Many discussions of Merleau-Ponty’s treatment of the bodily experience of space turn to his opus Phenomenology of Perception, where he most explicitly takes up the theme. Yet in Merleau-Ponty’s own view this treatment, while providing rich and valuable insights into spatial experience, remains unsatisfying: ultimately Phenomenology of Perception does not escape a dualism that, despite the work’s inestimable contributions to the philosophy of embodied experience, situates it within a flawed tradition running back through Husserl, Kant, and Descartes. As Merleau-Ponty himself (...)
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  3.  15
    Designing for Imprisonment: Architectural Ethics and Prison Design.Dominique Moran, Yvonne Jewkes & Colin Lorne - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    Architectural ethics has only begun to consider in earnest what it means, in a moral sense, to be an architect.1 The academy, however, has yet to adequately to explore the ethical problems raised,2 to evaluate the types of moral issues that arise, and to develop moral principles or moral reasons that should guide decisions when encountering these moral issues inherent in certain project types. This is the case despite the practice of architecture entailing “behaviours, our choices of which may be (...)
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  4.  16
    On the Use and Abuse of Historical Monuments for Life: Nietzsche And Confederate Monuments.Roger Paden - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    The practice of preserving various parts of urban landscapes for historical purposes raises a variety of normative, metaphysical, and conceptual questions that invite philosophical analysis. The normative questions are particularly interesting. Why should we preserve historical sites? What sites are worth preserving? How should they be preserved and interpreted?1 In this essay, I apply Nietzsche’s theories of history and culture as found in the first two Untimely Meditations to provide a fresh critical framework to some normative questions raised by a (...)
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  5.  11
    Complete Issue.Tom Spector - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
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  6.  16
    Architecture and the Political.Tom Spector - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    We are living through a radicalized, unsettling moment in Western politics as what seemed the drift of history towards democracy, greater individual freedoms, increased fairness and greater international cooperation is at least temporarily reversed. As we finished production of this issue, ISPA was also concluding its 4th Biennial conference at a most overtly political venue— The United States Air Force Academy—which is simultaneously a Mecca for modern architecture lovers as well as an indisputable seat of the projection of American power. (...)
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  7.  13
    Should Architects Refrain From Designing Prisons for Long-Term Solitary Confinement? – An Open Letter to the Architecture Profession.Tom Spector, Craig Borkenhagen, Mark Davis, Carrie Foster, Jacob Gann, Tou Lee Her, Aaron Klossner, Evan Murta, Ryan Rankin, Maria Cristina Rodriguez Santos, Connor Tascott, Sarah Turner & Spencer Williams - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    In a profile in the November, 2012 issue of the magazine Architect, activist-architect Raphael Sperry, a founder of the group Architects Planners & Designers for Social Responsibility discussed his petition to amend the AIA’s Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct to include a prohibition on “the design of spaces intended for long-term solitary isolation and execution.”1 This issue is both serious and timely. It deserves contemplative attention before any action is taken. The purpose of this letter is to provide the (...)
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  8.  19
    How Not to Be at Home in One’s Home: Adorno’s Critique of Architectural Reason.Matt Waggoner - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    Adorno wrote prolifically about modernism in culture and the arts, but little has been written about whether or in what form he might have addressed architectural concerns. The project of exploring this potentially fruitful intersection has been helped in the last couple of decades by authors from philosophy and critical theory contrasting his ideas about dwelling with Heidegger’s and by architectural theorists considering the import of his aesthetic theory.1 If these fall shy of the more immediate connections to architecture that (...)
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