Year:

  1.  9
    Neo-Expressivism: (Self-)Knowledge, Meaning, and Truth.Dorit Bar-On - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:11-34.
    Philosophers are often interested in explaining significant contrasts between ordinary descriptive discourses, on the one hand, and discourses – such as ethics, mathematics, or mentalistic discourse – that are thought to be more problematic in various ways. But certain strategies for ‘saving the differences’ can make it too difficult to preserve notable similarities across discourses. My own preference is for strategies that ‘save the differences’ without sacrificing logico-semantic continuities or committing to deflationism about truth, but also without embracing either truth-pluralism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  30
    Logical Expressivism and Carroll’s Regress.Corine Besson - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:35-62.
    In this paper, I address a key argument in favour of logical expressivism, the view that knowing a logical principle such as Modus Ponens is not a cognitive state but a pro-attitude towards drawing certain types of conclusions from certain types of premises. The argument is that logical expressivism is the only view that can take us out of Lewis Carroll's Regress – which suggests that elementary deductive reasoning is impossible. I show that the argument does not hold scrutiny and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  11
    What Is a Theory of Normative Concepts For?Matthew Chrisman - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:63-85.
    This paper compares and contrasts two recent approaches to the theory of normative concepts with each other and with more traditional theories in metaethics, in order to highlight several different projects one could be engaged in when developing a theory of normative concepts. The two accounts derive from Millgram, The Great Endarkenment and Chrisman The Meaning of ‘Ought’. These accounts share in rejecting traditional attempts to explain what ‘ought’ is about or expresses. Instead these accounts treat ‘ought’ as a quantificational (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  1
    Introduction: Expressivisms, Knowledge and Truth.M. J. Frápolli - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:1-9.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    Propositions First: Biting Geach's Bullet.M. J. Frápolli - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:87-110.
    To be a proposition is to possess propositional properties and to stand in inferential relations. This is the organic intuition, [OI], concerning propositional recognition. [OI] is not a circular characterization as long as those properties and relations that signal the presence of propositions are independently identified. My take on propositions does not depart from the standard approach widely accepted among philosophers of language. Propositions are truth-bearers, the arguments of truth-functions, the arguments of propositional-attitude verbs and the kind of entity capable (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  2
    Expressivism and Crossed Disagreements.Javier Osorio & Neftali Villanueva - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:111-132.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the connection between expressivism and disagreement. More in particular, the aim is to defend that one of the desiderata that can be derived from the study of disagreement, the explanation of ‘crossed disagreements’, can only be accommodated within a semantic theory that respects, at the meta-semantic level, certain expressivistic restrictions. We will compare contemporary dynamic expressivism with three different varieties of contextualist strategies to accommodate the specificities of evaluative language –indexical contextualism – (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  15
    Global Expressivism by the Method of Differences.Huw Price - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:133-154.
    In this piece I characterise global expressivism, as I understand it, by contrasting it with five other views: the so-called Canberra Plan; Moorean non-naturalism and platonism; ‘relaxed realism’ and quietism; local expressivism; and response-dependent realism. Some other familiar positions, including fictionalism, error theories, and idealism, are also mentioned, but as sub-cases to one of these five.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  12
    On Linguistic Evidence for Expressivism.Andrés Soria Ruiz & Isidora Stojanovic - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:155-180.
    This paper argues that there is a class of terms, orusesof terms, that are best accounted for by an expressivist account. We put forward two sets of criteria to distinguish between expressive and factual terms. The first set relies on the action-guiding nature of expressive language. The second set relies on the difference between one's evidence for making an expressive vs. factual statement. We then put those criteria to work to show, first, that the basic evaluative adjectives such as ‘good’ (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  3
    The Primacy of Practice.José L. Zalabardo - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 86:181-199.
    I argue that our procedures for determining whether ascriptions of a predicate represent things as being a certain way are ultimately pragmatic. Pragmatic procedures are not subject to validation by the referential procedure – determining whether there is a property playing the role of its referent. Predicates can represent even if we can't provide an independent identification of its referent. For these predicates, the speakers’ knowledge of how they represent objects as being would have to be construed in terms of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  5
    The Passions and Religious Belief.John Cottingham - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:57-74.
    Much contemporary philosophy of religion suffers from an overly abstract and intellectualized methodology. A more ‘humane’ approach would acknowledge the vital contribution of the emotions and passions to a proper cognitive grasp of the nature of the cosmos and our place within it. The point is illustrated by reference to a number of writers, including Descartes, whose path to knowledge of God, often thought to depend on dispassionate argument alone, in fact relies on a synergy between intellect and emotions.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  3
    How to Make the Passions Active: Spinoza and R.G. Collingwood.Alexander Douglas - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:237-249.
    Most early modern philosophers held that our emotions are always passions: to experience an emotion is to undergo something rather than to do something. Spinoza is different; he holds that our emotions – what he calls our ‘affects’ – can be actions rather than passions. Moreover, we can convert a passive affect into an active one simply by forming a clear and distinct idea of it. This theory is difficult to understand. I defend the interpretation R.G. Collingwood gives of it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  4
    The Persuasive Use of Emotions.Jamie Dow - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:211-236.
    The rhetorical power of emotions came to philosophers’ attention early on in the Western tradition: emotions can exert a powerful effect on what an audience comes to believe or decides to do. It is has been surprisingly neglected since, despite abundant philosophical literature on the emotions. This paper focuses on the mechanisms and propriety of emotional persuasion. Our central focus is an apparent tension between two claims. Persuasion should succeed by getting people convinced on grounds that contribute to justifying their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  7
    The Quest for God: Rethinking Desire.Fiona Ellis - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:157-173.
    How are we to view the nature of desire and its relation to value, humanity, and God? Sartre, Nietzsche, and Levinas have interesting things to say in this context, and they can be understood to be responding in their different ways to two seemingly opposed ways of conceiving of desire, namely, as lack or deficiency or as plenitude or creativity. I clarify, link, and distinguish the relevant conceptions of desire, and give a sense of what it could mean to comprehend (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  19
    Quantifier Variance Dissolved – Addendum.Suki Finn & Otávio Bueno - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:273.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  6
    The Aesthetic Dimension of Passion.Sebastian Gardner - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:111-133.
    This paper is stimulated by and indebted to a study by Charles Altieri of the ways in which affect is present and articulated in art and literature, which, he argues, hold significance for the philosophy of emotion. I focus on Altieri's thesis that affective states may have aesthetic qualities and value. I pursue this notion first with reference to Nietzsche's attempt to recruit affect as a means of countering Schopenhauer's pessimism. I then attempt to show the coherence of the notion (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  13
    The Evaluative Content of Emotion.Patricia Greenspan - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:75-86.
    The content of emotion sometimes seems to be conflated with its object, but we can distinguish between content and object on the model of Fregean sense versus reference. Fear, for instance, refers to something the subject of fear is afraid of and represents that object of fear as dangerous, so that the emotion can be said to have evaluative content. Here I attempt to clarify and defend my view of emotional discomfort or other affect as what does the evaluating. Some (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  11
    Biomedical Moral Enhancement in the Face of Moral Particularism – Addendum.Pei-Hua Huang & Peter Shiu-Hwa Tsu - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:271.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  4
    Responding Emotionally to Fiction: A Spinozist Approach.Susan James - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:195-210.
    Within contemporary analytical philosophy there continues to be a lively debate about the emotions we feel for fictional characters. How, for example, can we feel sad about Anna Karenina, despite knowing that she doesn't exist? I propose that we can get a clearer view of this issue by turning to Spinoza, who urges us to take a different approach to feelings of this kind. The ability to keep our emotions in line with our beliefs, he argues, is a complex skill. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  10
    A Truthful Way to Live? Objectivity, Ethics and Psychoanalysis.Michael Lacewing - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:175-193.
    Is there a best way to live? If so, is this a form of ethical life? The answer, I believe, turns on what we can say about the nature and place of the passions – emotions and desires – in our lives, including in particular, our ability to be truthful about our passions and our relations with other people. I approach the question through the work of Bernard Williams. I consider first what it might be for a way of life (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Lange Vs James on Emotion, Passion, and the Arts.Paisley Livingston - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:39-56.
    According to what is now the standard account in the history of psychology, in the 1880s William James and the Danish physician Carl Georg Lange independently developed a strikingly new theory, commonly referred to as the ‘James–Lange’ theory of emotion. In this paper it is argued that this standard account is highly misleading. Lange's views on affect in his Om Sindsbevægelser were more cautious than James allowed, and not open to criticisms that have often been levelled against the theory of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Preface.Anthony O'Hear - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:vii.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  9
    Ruly and Unruly Passions: Early Modern Perspectives.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:21-38.
    A survey of theories on the passions and action in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Britain and western Europe reveals that few, if any, of the major writers held the view that reason in any of its functions executes action without a passion. Even rationalists, like Cambridge Platonist Ralph Cudworth and English clergyman Samuel Clarke, recognized the necessity of passion to action. On the other hand, many of these intellectuals also agreed with French philosophers Jean-François Senault, René Descartes, and Nicolas Malebranche that, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  19
    Emotional Intentionality.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:251-269.
    This paper sketches an account of what distinguishes emotional intentionality from other forms of intentionality. I focus on the ‘two-sided’ structure of emotional experience. Emotions such as being afraid of something and being angry about something involve intentional states with specific contents. However, experiencing an entity, event, or situation in a distinctively emotional way also includes a wider-ranging disturbance of the experiential world within which the object of emotion is encountered. I consider the nature of this disturbance and its relationship (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  15
    Passion for the Art of Morally Responsible Technology Development.Sabine Roeser & Steffen Steinert - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:87-109.
    In this article, we discuss the importance of emotions for ethical reflection on technological developments, as well as the role that art can play in this. We review literature that argues that emotions can and should play an important role in the assessment and acceptance of technological risk and in designing morally responsible technologies. We then investigate how technologically engaged art can contribute to critical, emotional-moral reflection on technological risks. The role of art that engages with technology is unexplored territory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  15
    Why You'll Regret Not Reading This Paper.Mark Schroeder - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:135-156.
    In this paper, I explore the role for anticipated regret in major life decision-making, focusing on how it is employed by realistic decision-makers in a variety of realistic cases. I argue that the most obvious answers to how regret might matter in decision do not make these cases intelligible, but that we can make them intelligible through consideration of the significance of narrative in our own self-understanding.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  14
    Love, Guilt, and Forgiveness.Eleonore Stump - 2019 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85:1-19.
    In Simon Wiesenthal's book The Sunflower: On the Possibility and Limits of Forgiveness, Wiesenthal tells the story of a dying German soldier who was guilty of horrendous evil against Jewish men, women, and children, but who desperately wanted forgiveness from and reconciliation with at least one Jew before his death. Wiesenthal, then a prisoner in a camp, was brought to hear the German soldier's story and his pleas for forgiveness. As Wiesenthal understands his own reaction to the German soldier, he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues