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  1.  10
    Framing Effects in Museum Narratives: Objectivity in Interpretation Revisited.Anna Bergqvist - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:295-318.
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  2.  2
    Context and Experiencing the Sacred.David Brown - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:117-132.
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  3.  2
    The Museum of Big Ideas.Ivan Gaskell - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:55-75.
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  4.  9
    Word and Object: Museums and the Matter of Meaning.Garry L. Hagberg - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:261-293.
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  5.  5
    Introduction to Philosophy and Museums: Essays in the Philosophy of Museums.Victoria S. Harrison, Anna Bergqvist & Gary Kemp - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:1-12.
    Museums and their practices—especially those involving collection, curation and exhibition—generate a host of philosophical questions. Such questions are not limited to the domains of ethics and aesthetics, but go further into the domains of metaphysics, epistemology and philosophy of religion. Despite the prominence of museums as public institutions, they have until recently received surprisingly little scrutiny from philosophers in the Anglo-American tradition. By bringing together contributions from philosophers with backgrounds in a range of traditional areas of philosophy, this volume demonstrates (...)
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  6.  3
    The Participatory Art Museum: Approached From a Philosophical Perspective.Sarah Hegenbart - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:319-339.
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  7.  2
    Museums and the Nostalgic Self.Michael P. Levine - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:77-94.
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  8.  4
    ‘A Sudden Surprise of the Soul’: Wonder in Museums and Early Modern Philosophy.Beth Lord - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:95-116.
  9.  1
    Are Holocaust Museums Unique?Paul Morrow - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:133-157.
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  10.  3
    Museums and Their Paradoxes.Mark O'Neill - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:13-34.
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  11.  12
    What Do We See in Museums?Graham Oddie - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:217-240.
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  12.  3
    The Ethics of Trusteeship and the Biography of Objects.Andreas Pantazatos - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:179-197.
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  13.  1
    People and Things: Questions Museums Make Us Ask and Answer.Alda Rodrigues - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:199-216.
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  14.  9
    An Honest Display of Fakery: Replicas and the Role of Museums.Constantine Sandis - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:241-259.
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  15.  4
    The Open Museum and its Enemies: An Essay in the Philosophy of Museums.Charles Taliaferro - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:35-53.
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  16.  1
    Museums, Ethics and Truth: Why Museums' Collecting Policies Must Face Up to the Problem of Testimony.Philip Tonner - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:159-177.
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  17.  10
    The Analytic Revolution.Michael Beaney - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:227-249.
    Analytic philosophy, as we recognize it today, has its origins in the work of Gottlob Frege and Bertrand Russell around the turn of the twentieth century. Both were trained as mathematicians and became interested in the foundations of mathematics. In seeking to demonstrate that arithmetic could be derived from logic, they revolutionized logical theory and in the process developed powerful new forms of logical analysis, which they employed in seeking to resolve certain traditional philosophical problems. There were important differences in (...)
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  18.  8
    Aristotle Through Lenses From Bernard Williams.S. Broadie - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:23-35.
    This paper looks at a theme in ancient Greek ethics from perspectives developed by Bernard Williams.1 The ancient theme is the place of theoretical activity in human life, and I shall be referring to Aristotle. Williams is relevant through one strand in his scepticism about.2 His discussion suggests questions not merely about Aristotle but ones it would be interesting to put to Aristotle and see how he would or should respond to them.
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  19.  10
    Aquinas on What God is Not.Brian Davies - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:55-71.
    It is often said that if God exists, he is strongly comparable to what is not divine. In particular, it has been claimed that for God to exist is for a person to exist. In what follows I show how, esteemed theologian though he is commonly taken to be, Thomas Aquinas adopts a strongly different line of thinking according to which we seriously do not know what God is. In doing so, I draw attention to his use of nominal definitions (...)
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  20.  16
    Kant's Third Critique: The Project of Unification.Sebastian Gardner - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:161-185.
    This paper offers a synoptic view of Kant's Critique of the Power of Judgement and its reception by the German Idealists. I begin by sketching Kant's conception of how its several parts fit together, and emphasize the way in which the specifically moral motivation of Kant's project of unification of Freedom and Nature distances it from our contemporary philosophical concerns. For the German Idealists, by contrast, the CPJ's conception of the opposition of Freedom and Nature as defining the overarching task (...)
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  21.  12
    Why Should We Read Spinoza?Susan James - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:109-125.
    Historians of philosophy are well aware of the limitations of what Butterfield called : narratives of historical progress that culminate in an enlightened present. Yet many recent studies retain a somewhat teleological outlook. Why should this be so? To explain it, I propose, we need to take account of the emotional investments that guide our interest in the philosophical past, and the role they play in shaping what we understand as the history of philosophy. As far as I know, this (...)
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  22.  2
    Hume's ‘Manifest Contradictions’.P. J. E. Kail - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:147-160.
  23.  12
    What is the Matter with Matter, According to Plotinus?A. A. Long - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:37-54.
    Modern science is not linguistically original in hypothesizing the existence of dark matter. For Plotinus, the matter that underlies all perceptible objects, is essentially obscure and describable only in the negative terms of what it lacks by way of inherent properties. In formulating this theory of absolute matter, Plotinus took himself to be interpreting both Plato and Aristotle, with the result that his own position emerges as a highly original and equivocal synthesis of this tradition. Plotinus did not claim that (...)
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  24.  16
    Is Nietzsche a Life-Affirmer?Simon May - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:211-226.
    The question of how to affirm one's life in view of suffering and loss is central to Nietzsche's philosophy. He shows, I claim, that one can affirm one's life as a whole, conceived as necessary in all its elements, while also despising parts of it. Yet he mostly pictures such life-affirmation as achievable only via an atheistic theodicy that relies on a key ambition of the very system of morality that he famously attacks: namely to explain or justify suffering in (...)
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  25.  6
    Ramsey's Cognitivism: Truth, Ethics and the Meaning of Life.Cheryl Misak - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:251-263.
    Frank Ramsey is usually taken to be an emotivist or an expressivist about the good: he is usually taken to bifurcate inquiry into fact-stating and non-fact stating domains, ethics falling into the latter. In this paper I shall argue that whatever the very young Ramsey's view might have been, towards the end of his short life, he was coming to a through-going and objective pragmatism about all our beliefs, including those about the good, beauty, and even the meaning of life. (...)
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  26.  9
    Descartes on the Errors of the Senses.Sarah Patterson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:73-108.
    Descartes first invokes the errors of the senses in the Meditations to generate doubt; he suggests that because the senses sometimes deceive, we have reason not to trust them. This use of sensory error to fuel a sceptical argument fits a traditional interpretation of the Meditations as a work concerned with finding a form of certainty that is proof against any sceptical doubt. If we focus instead on Descartes's aim of using the Meditations to lay foundations for his new science, (...)
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  27.  11
    Wittgenstein and the Illusion of ‘Progress’: On Real Politics and Real Philosophy in a World of Technocracy.Rupert Read - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:265-284.
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  28.  26
    An Introduction to Plato's Theory of Forms.David Sedley - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:3-22.
    This lecture was designed as an introduction to Plato's theory of Forms. Reference is made to key passages of Plato's dialogues, but no guidance on further reading is offered, and numerous controversies about the theory's interpretation are left in the background. An initial sketch of the theory's origins in the inquiries of Plato's teacher Socrates is followed by an explanation of the Forms metaphysical relation to sensible particulars, their, and the range of items that have Forms. Finally, the envisaged structure (...)
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  29.  21
    Why Hegel Now – and in What Form?Robert Stern - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:187-210.
    This paper considers the prospects for the current revival of interest in Hegel, and the direction it might take. Looking back to Richard J. Bernstein's paper from 1977, on, it contrasts his optimistic assessment of a rapprochement between Hegel and analytic philosophy with Sebastian Gardner's more pessimistic view, where Gardner argues that Hegel's idealist account of value makes any such rapprochement impossible. The paper explores Hegel's account of value further, arguing for a middle way between these extremes of optimism and (...)
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  30.  8
    Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It also (...)
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