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  1.  22
    Squaring the Circles: a Genealogy of Principia ’s Dot Notation.Landon D. C. Elkind - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):42-65.
    Russell derived many of his logical symbols from the pioneering notation of Giuseppe Peano. Principia Mathematica (1910–13) made these “Peanese” symbols (and others) famous. Here I focus on one of the more peculiar notational derivatives from Peano, namely, Principia ’s dual use of a squared dot or dots for both conjunction and scope. As Dirk Schlimm has noted, Peano always had circular dots and only used them to symbolize scope distinctions. In contrast, Principia has squared dots and conventions such that (...)
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  2.  12
    Jean Nicod: Familial Background and Pacifist Commitment.Sébastien Gandon - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):66-82.
    This article has two purposes: first, to describe some archival discoveries about Nicod’s family background, academic development and political life; and second, to publish and comment on a newly discovered article by Nicod about Russell. This article acclaims not only Russell’s achievements in logic and philosophy—as one might expect from such a devoted protégé as Nicod—but also (albeit only in glimpses permitted by France’s wartime censorship) his anti-war politics and writings. As the reader will realize, the two objectives are connected: (...)
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  3.  24
    Moore’s Beginnings (review).Nicholas Griffin - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):86-97.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Moore’s BeginningsNicholas GriffinConsuelo Preti. The Metaphysical Basis of Ethics: G. E. Moore and the Origins of Analytic Philosophy. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2022. Pp. xx, 268. isbn: 978-0-230-27762-5, us$57.50 (hb); 978-1-137-31907-4, us$44.99 (ebook).For many years now Consuelo Preti has been studying the life and work of G. E. Moore, especially in the period before the First World War when he and Russell were closest. In a series of important (...)
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  4.  22
    Russell’s Representationalism about Consciousness: Reconsidering His Relationship to James.Alexander Klein - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):3-41.
    While Russell famously rejected the pragmatist theory of truth, recent scholarship portrays his post-prison accounts of belief and knowledge as resembling James’s. But deeper divisions in fact persisted between Russell and James concerning the nature of mind. I argue 1) that Russell’s neutral monist approach to consciousness in The Analysis of Mind constitutes an early form of representationalism in that he took states to be phenomenally conscious partly in virtue of (truly) representing an antecedent (typically just-passed) sensation; 2) that although (...)
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  5.  21
    Causes of War.Bertrand Russell - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):83-84.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Causes of WarBertrand RussellRussell’s authorship of this anonymously published entry in An Encylopaedia of Pacifism (London: Chatto & Windus, 1937), pp. 12–13, has only just come to light, thanks to the recent sale at auction of a letter to him from Aldous Huxley. If this determination had been made earlier, the text would have featured in Papers 21. In acknowledging receipt of “Causes of War” on 14 December 1936, (...)
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  6.  7
    Colette’s Trethowan Cup.Sheila Turcon - 2023 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 43 (1):85-85.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Colette’s Trethowan CupSheila Turcon Click for larger view View full resolutionOn 31 January 1918, Constance Malleson told Russell that she had bought him this unique Wedgwood cup and saucer, now on permanent display outside the reading room of the Russell Archives. As “the only one of its kind in the whole world”, she considered it “eminently suited” to her lover. She thought it had been designed by Harry Trethowan, (...)
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