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  1. Teaching the Philosophy of Science to Undergraduate Science Students.Agustín Adúriz-Bravo - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1 - 2):177-182.
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  2.  1
    Analyzing the Language of an Adapted Primary Literature Article.Moriah Ariely, Zohar Livnat & Anat Yarden - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):63-85.
    Learning the unique linguistic forms and structures that construct and communicate scientific principles, knowledge, and beliefs is important for developing students’ disciplinary literacy. The use of scientific language is apparent in the texts that scientists produce to communicate their findings to other scientists—the research articles. Texts are underused in the science classroom and the texts that students do read often do not reflect the core attributes of authentic scientific reasoning. Adapted primary literature refers to an educational genre that enables the (...)
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  3.  4
    The Value of False Theories in Science Education.Sindhuja Bhakthavatsalam - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):5-23.
    Teaching false theories goes against the general pedagogical and philosophical belief that we must only teach and learn what is true. In general, the goal of pedagogy is taken to be epistemic: to gain knowledge and avoid ignorance. In this article, I argue that for realists and antirealists alike, epistemological and pedagogical goals have to come apart. I argue that the falsity of a theory does not automatically make it unfit for being taught. There are several good reasons for teaching (...)
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  4. Exploring Secondary School Students’ Stances on the Predictive and Explanatory Power of Science.Berry Billingsley & Mehdi Nassaji - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):87-107.
    There are widespread calls for school education to put more emphasis on developing students’ appreciation of the power and limitations of science. Without effective teaching, there is a risk that sensationalist media claims will unduly influence students’ perceptions of the power of science to already explain and predict aspects of our daily lives. Secondly, schools have a role in preparing students for a future in which they are likely to work and play alongside increasingly humanlike machines. The study reported here (...)
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  5.  3
    Skill Transmittance in Science Education.Brandon Boesch - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):45-61.
    It is widely argued that the skills of scientific expertise are tacit, meaning that they are difficult to study. In this essay, I draw on work from the philosophy of action about the nature of skills to show that there is another access point for the study of skills—namely, skill transmission in science education. I will begin by outlining Small’s Aristotelian account of skills, including a brief exposition of its advantages over alternative accounts of skills. He argues that skills exist (...)
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  6.  3
    The Role of Art Practice in Elementary School Science.Cecilia Caiman & Britt Jakobson - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):153-175.
    The aim of this study was to examine the role of aesthetic practice in elementary school and the consequences for children’s meaning-making in science. More specifically, we intended to scrutinise what science learning emerges within the process, to target the consequences of adopting art practice in science class and to explore these two dimensions as a whole in order to better understand how children make meaning when exploring animals’ ecology. The data, comprising audio recordings, photographs of children’s drawings and field (...)
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  7.  2
    Bringing Inferentialism to Science Education.Edward Causton - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):25-43.
    In this article, I introduce Robert Brandom’s inferentialism as an alternative to common representational interpretations of constructivism in science education. By turning our attention away from the representational role of conceptual contents and toward the norms governing their use in inferences, we may interpret knowledge as a capacity to engage in a particular form of social activity, the game of giving and asking for reasons. This capacity is not readily reduced to a diagrammatic structure defining the knowledge to be acquired. (...)
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  8.  4
    Science as a Vaccine.Angelo Fasce & Alfonso Picó - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):109-125.
    In this study, we explore the relation between scientific literacy and unwarranted beliefs. The results show heterogeneous interactions between six constructs: conspiracy theories poorly interact with scientific literacy; there are major differences between attitudinal and practical dimensions of critical thinking; paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs show similar associations ; and, only scientific knowledge interacts with other predictor of unwarranted beliefs, such as ontological confusions. These results reveal a limited impact: science educators must take into account the complex interactions between the dimensions (...)
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  9. A Brief History of the Gene Concept.Veronica S. Flodin - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1 - 2):183-187.
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  10.  1
    The Use of Interactive Fiction to Promote Conceptual Change in Science.Simon Flynn & Mark Hardman - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):127-152.
    In recent years, researchers within science education have started to consider the impact of narrative upon teaching and learning in science. This article investigates the possibilities of interactive fiction as a means by which students can be provided with feedback on their understanding in science, and explores the mechanisms which might allow learning from this. Through a review of literature around the use of narrative in science education, we have produced a list of recommendations that might guide the development of (...)
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  11.  2
    Empirical Philosophy of Science.Kostas Kampourakis - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1-2):1-3.
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  12. Do Religious People Hate Science?James Riley - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1 - 2):189-191.
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  13. Knowing the Early Modern World: Van Helmont’s Universal Philosophy.Tillmann Taape - 2019 - Science & Education 28 (1 - 2):193-195.
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