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  1.  5
    The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Governmentality: An Unwritten Chapter in Foucault’s Genealogy of the Modern State.Antoon Braeckman - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):134-156.
    ABSTRACT One of the productive political-philosophical concepts Foucault developed is that of governmentality. According to Foucault, governmentality is in many respects the heir of pastoral power. However, Foucault has never conclusively demonstrated the genealogical link between pastoral power and governmentality. The hypothesis that I want to put forward is that the “missing link” in this genealogy should be situated in the governmental transformations that took place in the period of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, more specifically in the period of the (...)
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  2.  4
    Post-Marxists and “Young Marxists”: Two Conflicting Visions of Radical Democracy.Martin Deleixhe - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):157-171.
    ABSTRACT Radical democracy was, at its inception, a polemical alternative to the hegemony of Marxism over the political discourse of the Left. This is particularly striking in the work of two of its figureheads, Miguel Abensour and Chantal Mouffe. Whereas C. Mouffe advocates for radical democracy to break free from the rigidness and the determinacy of Marxism, M. Abensour goes back to the young Marx’s plea for a “real democracy”. It results in radical democrats locating differently the radicality of their (...)
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  3.  1
    Tenses of the Present.Peter Morgan - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):203-210.
    ABSTRACT David Roberts’ History of the Present asks what comes after the grand narratives of European modernity. Progress is over, but without a past and with no assured future, the present remains in conceptual limbo. For Roberts, we are entering a new stage of a global cultural modernity marked by the end of European modernism. Taking a fresh look at the contested endings of the modern, Roberts suggests that an extended concept of contemporaneity might replace the problematic dualism of past (...)
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  4.  3
    Judith Butler and the Politics of Epistemic Frames.Gavin Rae - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):172-187.
    ABSTRACT Judith Butler’s work has tended to be read through two axes: an early gender theory/later ethical theory division, and/or an ethical/political divide. In contrast, I aim to undercut both hermeneutical strategies by turning to her epistemology, as manifested through her analyses of normativity and “frames,” to argue that the latter acts as the hinge uniting her so-called early and later works and the ethical and political dimensions of her thinking. From this premise, I maintain that Butler affirms that these (...)
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  5.  5
    The Cruel and Benevolent Knife: Hannah Arendt’s Critique of Compassion in Politics.Allegra Reinalda - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):188-202.
    ABSTRACT What is the place of compassion in politics? For Hannah Arendt, compassion – a natural fellow-feeling for a suffering other – cannot be brought into politics without damaging both the feeling and the political realm. Arendt develops this analysis in the context of her critique of the French revolution, particularly its Jacobin episode. According to Arendt, the Jacobins attempted to keep the revolution’s compass fixed on unanimity and social cohesion by deploying a discourse of compassion. My reconstruction of Arendt’s (...)
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  6.  3
    Trumpism and the Defense of Individual Liberties: Considerations on Marcel Gauchet’s Discussion of Individualism.Brian C. J. Singer - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (2):111-133.
    ABSTRACT Marcel Gauchet spoke of the “eclipse of the political” during the neo-liberal era, but with the rise of populism he is now forced to speak of a “revenge of the political”. As the eclipse was discussed in terms of a new era of individualization, understood as the culmination of the “disenchantment of the world”, one has a right to ask what is the place of individualization in the era of the political’s revenge, particularly as, in the face of Covid (...)
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  7.  6
    Freedom, Normativity, and Concepts: Adorno Contra Brandom on the Path From Kant.Samuel Ferns - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):55-77.
    ABSTRACT Robert Brandom reads from Kant an account of reasoning and concept use centred upon normativity and autonomous freedom in the act of judgement. I claim that this reading is flawed because it screens from view another aspect of Kant’s reflections on freedom and reason. By comparing Brandom’s interpretation of Kant with that of Theodor W. Adorno, highlighting their contrasting views of the relation between transcendental and empirical, I contend that Brandom unduly conflates freedom and normativity and thereby takes the (...)
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  8. Freedom as a Matter of Resistance in the Philosophy of Schelling.Daniele Fulvi - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):78-92.
    ABSTRACT In this paper, I demonstrate that the concept of resistance is fundamental in order to understand Schelling’s account of freedom. First, I argue that Schelling, in his early works, contends that the resistance opposed by nature to our individual will is fundamental for human beings to actualise freedom. Moreover, I show that Schelling maintains the centrality of resistance even in his philosophy of nature, and I demonstrate that resistance is that fundamental ontological occurrence which grounds the opposition between the (...)
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  9.  2
    Immanent Critique in Thucydides’ Mytilenean Debate and Melian Dialogue.Otto Linderborg - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):44-54.
    ABSTRACT This article investigates social critique in Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War. Two famous Thucydidean episodes are in focus: the Mytilenean Debate in Book III and the Melian Dialogue in Book V of the History. These episodes are interpreted here as inquiries assuming the shape of subversive and transformative social criticism: immanent critique. Immanent critique aims at shifting horizons of meaning in social contexts, and the philosophers practicing this kind of social criticism understand themselves as physicians of a failing (...)
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  10. Immanuel Kant’s Monograms of the Imagination.Peter Murphy - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):93-109.
    ABSTRACT John Rundell’s Kant explores the themes of imagination, anthropology and freedom across the entire Kantian corpus. The book casts a revealing light on Kant’s conception of the imagination. It does so in a sustained dialogue with Immanuel Kant’s views on the human condition and political and civil freedom. Rundell explores different approaches that Kant employs to account for the imagination. Rundell’s Kant discusses reproductive, productive, synthesising, monogrammatical, schematic, free, wild and sublime forms of imagination and how these are deeply (...)
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  11.  21
    The Conditions of Immanent Critique.Alexei Procyshyn - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (1):22-43.
    ABSTRACT This article contributes to methodological debates in contemporary critical theory regarding the scope and features of immanent critique. I spell out the philosophical commitments presupposed by this approach to criticism and identify its basic features by comparing it with more recognizable argumentative or interpretative strategies. This comparison yields three immanent-critical requirements – for inherence, contradiction, and access – which bring into relief the heuristic and ampliative character of immanent criticism. Yet, these requirements also imply that “immanent critique” is not (...)
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