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  1.  4
    Christian Bioethics: Immanent Goals or a Transcendent Orientation?Mark J. Cherry - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):113-123.
    This issue of Christian Bioethics explores foundational debates regarding the orientation and application of Christian bioethics. Should Christian bioethics be approached as essentially a human activity, grounded in scholarly study of theological arguments and religious virtues, oriented toward practical social ends, or should Christian bioethics be recognized as the result of properly oriented prayer, fasting, and asceticism leading to an encounter with God? The gulf between these two general perspectives—the creation of immanent human goods versus submission to a fully transcendent (...)
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  2.  6
    Medicine and the Common Good in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition.Kyle E. Karches - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):124-144.
    Whereas bioethicists generally consider medicine a practice aimed at the individual good of each patient, in this paper I present an alternative conception of the goods of medicine. I first explain how modern liberal political theory gives rise to the predominant view of the medical good and then contrast this understanding of politics with that of Thomas Aquinas, informed by Aristotle. I then show how this Christian politics is implicit in certain aspects of contemporary medical practice and argue that Christians (...)
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  3.  5
    Risk, Health, and Physical Enhancement: The Dangers of Health Care as Risk Reduction for Christian Bioethics.Paul Scherz - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):145-162.
    Medicine increasingly envisions health promotion in terms of reducing risk as determined by quantitative risk factors, such as blood pressure, blood lipids, or genetic variants. This essay argues that this vision of health care as risk reduction is dangerous for Christian bioethics, since risk can be infinitely reduced leading to a self-defeating spiral of iatrogenic effects. Moreover, it endangers character because this vision of health is connected to a reductionist vision of the body and an understanding of individual risk that (...)
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  4.  4
    Orthodox Perspectives on In Vitro Fertilization in Russia.Roman Tarabrin - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):177-204.
    The views on in vitro fertilization within Russian Orthodox Christian society are diverse. One reason for that variation is the ambiguity found in “The Basis of the Social Concept,” the document issued in 2000 by the Russian Orthodox Church and considered to be the primary guidelines for determining the Church’s stance on bioethics. This essay explores how the treatment of infertility reconciles with the Orthodox Christian faith and what methods of medical assistance for infertility may be appropriate for Orthodox Christians. (...)
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  5.  9
    Christian Integrity Regained: Reformational Worldview Engagement for Everyday Medical Practice.Jon Tilburt, Joel Pacyna & James Rusthoven - 2020 - Christian Bioethics 26 (2):163-176.
    How does one committed to the claims of Christ and a biblical story of redemption live Christianly and navigate the competing worldviews encountered in everyday medical practice? Adopting the practical conceptual framework promoted by Reformed Christian philosopher and theologian Albert Wolters, we argue for an all-encompassing biblical understanding of God’s cosmic redemption plan for the entire creation order in contrast to a more typical sacred/secular duality. We then apply the concepts of structure and direction, drawn from a pretheological understanding of (...)
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