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  1.  19
    A Digital Picture to Hold Us Captive? A Flusserian Interpretation of Misinformation Sharing on Social Media.Lavinia Marin - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (3):485–504.
    In this article I investigate online misinformation from a media philosophy perspective. I, thus move away from the debate focused on the semantic content, concerned with what is true or not about misinformation. I argue rather that online misinformation is the effect of an informational climate promoted by user micro-behaviours such as liking, sharing, and posting. Misinformation online is explained as the effect of an informational environment saturated with and shaped by techno-images in which most users act automatically under the (...)
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  2.  7
    Homo Animalis, a Japanese Futurism.Hiroki Azuma & Yuk Hui - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):401-408.
    In this dialogue, Hiroki Azuma discusses with Yuk Hui about the perception of technology in Japan after the defeat in the Second World War, from the Kyoto School to the postmodern critics, and the ambivalent conflicts between the modern and the tradition. The postmodern culture has a different signification in Japan than in the West as well as in other parts of Asia. Azuma documents the rise of the Otaku culture in Japan, and calls them “database animals,” a thesis that (...)
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  3.  6
    On Necropolitics and Techno-Scotosis.Babette Babich - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):305-324.
    To talk about automation and invisibility in our digitally projected world, I argue the case for the “cancelled” or lost voices of postphenomenology such as, most notably, Günther Anders. Reflecting on Nietzsche as on the role of GPS for location and for dating services like Grindr, I take up Nietzschean humanism including the fragility of his portable brass typing ball, latterly not unlike daisy wheel printer technologies and the programmed death of ink jet printers. With a casual reflection on pocket (...)
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  4.  3
    Jacques Derrida, Life Death.Jonathan Basile - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):409-415.
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  5.  5
    Heidegger and the Automatic Earth Image.Howard Caygill - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):325-338.
    The article reflects on Heidegger’s admission in the 1966 Spiegel Interview that he was shocked by images of the Earth taken from space. It asks what these images were and shows that far from testifying to the encounter of planetary technics and the modern human they evince the meeting between an improvised automated technology of image capture and contingency.
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  6.  2
    Invitations to Multiplicity.Jessica S. Elkayam - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):433-440.
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  7.  2
    John McCumber, The Philosophy Scare: The Politics of Reason in the Early Cold War.Jeffrey Epstein - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):417-423.
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  8.  2
    Not-Being-at-Ease.Jennifer Gammage - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):441-448.
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  9.  1
    John E. Drabinski, Glissant and the Middle Passage.Miguel Gualdron Ramirez - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):425-431.
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  10.  18
    On the Limit of Artificial Intelligence.Yuk Hui - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):339-357.
    This article asks how can we articulate the limit of artificial intelligence, which virtually has no limit? Or maybe the definition of AI already implies its limit, how Marvin Minsky once declared that there is no generally accepted theory of intelligence, and that AI is only one particular way of modelling it. This article revisits the debate between Minsky and Hubert Dreyfus and repositions them in terms of an opposition between mechanism and organism, in order to expose the limit of (...)
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  11.  5
    Introduction: Philosophy After Automation?Yuk Hui - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):217-233.
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  12.  33
    The Artifact of Non-Humanity A Materialist Account of the Signifying Automaton and Its Physical Support in a Fantasized Unity.Katerina Kolozova - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):359-374.
    The scope of the paper is to present the concept of the radical dyad of the “non-human,” in an attempt to think radical humanity in terms of Marxian materialism, which is the product of approaching Marx’s writings on “the real” and “the physical” by way of François Laruelle’s non-philosophical method. Unlike posthumanism, inspired by critical theory and the method of poststructuralism, the theory of the non-human, as a radical dyad of technology in the generic sense of the word (ranging from (...)
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  13.  4
    Towards Idiodiversity.Michał Krzykawski - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):265-287.
    This article discusses translation as a technique of doing philosophy and introduces the concept of idiodiversity as an alternative to the current model of automated translation machines. The dominant functionalist approach to technology has made these machines the agents of linguistic homogenisation, which constitutes a threat for the diversity of idiomatic open systems this article advocates for. However, as this article argues, the challenge is not merely to accuse automated translation technologies of impoverishing the knowledge of how to translate but, (...)
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  14.  6
    Landscapes of Technological Thoughts.Pieter Lemmens & Yuk Hui - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):375-389.
    In this dialogue with Yuk Hui, Pieter Lemmens explains the discipline called philosophy of technology and gives a concise overview of the most important contemporary approaches within this field. He also offers a critical evaluation of what are probably the two most salient characteristics of contemporary philosophy of technology, the so-called “empirical turn” and the “ethical turn,” which are deeply related and partly reflect the discipline’s on-going alignment with the global neoliberal agenda of exclusively profit-driven technological innovation. He also critically (...)
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  15.  5
    The Automation of Philosophy or the Game of Induction.Anna Longo - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):289-303.
    In order to think of philosophy after automation, we have to ask if there is more in philosophy than the process of learning what philosophy is by inducing, from actual inferential practices, the future possible moves that are believed to produce philosophical truths. In the same way as the production of scientific hypothesis has been automated like a self-updating process which entails schemas of decisions and actions, philosophy itself, once conceived as a game where the truth of the statements is (...)
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  16.  4
    Automation, Alteration.Jean-Luc Nancy & Daniel Ross - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):235-240.
    Is “philosophy after automation” a theme or a question? One might hesitate about this, because we may wonder whether or not it implies that philosophy could disappear after automation, or at least be subject to serious revision. Philosophy could be read as a historical movement towards self-determination [autodétermination] as well as the exposition of the limit of such a program of archi-autonomy. The Cartesian event is essentially ambivalent, and man alone in the world is undoubtedly also the one who can (...)
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  17.  3
    In-Between-Worlds and Re-Membering.Mariana Ortega - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):449-458.
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  18.  6
    Elements for a Neganthropology of Automatic Man.Bernard Stiegler & Daniel Ross - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):241-264.
    Ours is an age of general automation. The factory that produced proletarians now extends to the biosphere; consequently, disautomatization is needed, which is the real meaning of autonomy. Autonomy and automatism must be reconceived as a composition rather than an opposition. Knowledge depends on hypomnesic automatisms that open up the possibility of what Socrates called “thinking for oneself”; digitalization thus requires a new epistemology that entails questions of political and libidinal economy. Today, automatization serves the autonomization of technics more than (...)
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  19.  32
    For a Strategic Primitivism.Eduardo Viveiros de Castro & Yuk Hui - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):391-400.
    In this dialogue with Yuk Hui, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro discusses his work on the Amerindian perspectivism, multinaturalism; the relation between nature, culture and technics in his ethnographic studies; as well as the necessity of a non-anthropocentric definition of technology. He also discusses a haunting futurism of ecological crisis and automation of the Anthropocene, and explores a “strategic primitivism” as survival tool.
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  20.  3
    Distant Poverty, Human Vulnerability, and the African Ethics of Character.Ronald Olufemi Badru - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):1-19.
    This African moral framework discusses distant poverty as human vulnerability. Contextually, if vulnerability means human frailty, relative to some opposing facts of life, and that poverty makes the human person frail, relative to some largely unrealized/unrealizable desirables without assistance, then distant poverty as human vulnerability invariably connects, significantly, with poor dependency: poor people are vulnerable as dependent on the assisting other. Some fundamental questions arise: 1) What is the ontology of distant poverty as human vulnerability? 2) In what ways does (...)
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  21.  5
    The Body a Guiding Thread.Ali Beheler - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):69-88.
    Despite a shared recognition of the significant contribution of corporeality to normative phenomena such as agency, it is rare for Nietzsche scholarship on naturalism and agency to include explicit employment of so-called “new materialist” approaches to agency. In an effort to show the fecundity of such an employment, I apply Diana Coole’s notion of a spectrum of distributed agentic capacities to a reading of passages within Nietzsche’s genealogy of the subject. I suggest that doing so helps to emphasize the significant (...)
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  22.  5
    Unseen Wounds.Fabian Bernhardt - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):21-36.
    Philosophical interest in vulnerability focusses mainly on normative questions concerning its relevance for moral, political and legal theory. However, beneath these questions there lies another one which is epistemological: How do we gain clear knowledge about another person’s pain and suffering? How do we recognize a wounded life? Drawing primarily on the account of Elaine Scarry, the article aims at showing that the difficulties to apprehend and recognize a life as injured are not only grounded in political and cultural frames, (...)
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  23.  5
    Weak Action.Jan Bierhanzl - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):37-47.
    The notion of “weak action” is developed in this paper in an attempt to overcome the schism between the action of a free political subject on the one hand, and their dependency on the support of others and the environment on the other. This paper focuses foremost on Judith Butler’s later work raising two different questions. First, following Butler and her critical reading of Levinas, the problem is raised how and at what price the ethics of vulnerability would be able (...)
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  24.  3
    Simon Critchley, Tragedy, the Greeks, and Us.Andrew J. Cooper - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):211-215.
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  25.  11
    Political New Sincerity and Profilicity.Paul J. D’Ambrosio & Hans-Georg Moeller - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):105-123.
    The past few years have seen a dramatic backlash against identity politics from academics such as Michael Sandel, Kwame Appiah, Mark Lilla, and Francis Fukuyama. In the vocabulary of identity conceptions, we can classify this as a reaction to a growing dissatisfaction with the perceived hollowness and ineffectiveness of “authenticity” that calls for a return to “sincerity”—or a “Political New Sincerity.” We argue that a third identity paradigm is in play as well, namely “profilicity.” This profile-based approach to understanding oneself, (...)
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  26.  10
    Phenomenology with Big-Hearted Reason.Kadir Filiz, Claude Romano & Christina M. Gschwandtner - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):183-200.
    In this interview, Claude Romano discusses his phenomenological project of the event in relation to hermeneutics, reason, realism, and some other fundamental problems of phenomenology. He explains common themes in his phenomenological project and elucidates why he considers it important to leave behind the transcendental perspective in phenomenology. He distinguishes his descriptive realism from other realist movements in contemporary French philosophy. The interview also questions the Eurocentric orientation of many phenomenological authors and considers the possibility of going beyond such assumptions (...)
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  27.  4
    Thinking the Event in Heidegger’s “Black Notebooks”.Sebastiano Galanti Grollo - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):89-104.
    In this essay I examine the concept of the “event” in Heideggerian thought, with particular reference to the first volume of the Black Notebooks, which is contemporaneous with Contributions to Philosophy and Notes III from the fourth volume. At issue are the concepts of “event”, “essential unfolding”, and “expropriation”, which assume considerable importance in the mid-1930s. Through his treatment of the event, Heidegger reinterprets being as an alterity with respect to beings and to Dasein, in that being withdraws and conceals (...)
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  28.  3
    Epistrophe and Metanoia in the History of Philosophy.Pierre Hadot & Andrew Irvine - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):201-210.
    Crucial in Pierre Hadot’s account of ancient philosophy as a way of life is the phenomenon of conversion. Well before he encountered some of the decisive influences upon his understanding of philosophy, Hadot already understood ancient philosophy and its long legacy in later thinkers of the West as much more than a formal discourse. Philosophy is an experience, or at least the exploration and articulation of a potential for experience. The energy of this potential originates in a polar tension between (...)
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  29.  1
    “Translation” as Metaphor and as Task.Ulrike Kistner - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):125-143.
    The distinct role of the concept metaphor of “translation” in psychoanalysis has been obscured. It has generally been considered in conjunction if not synonymy with metaphors of “writing/graphy,” leaving it theoretically underdetermined. Its distinct role went largely unnoticed, moreover, since Freud himself dropped the concept metaphor of translation from his work after 1900. However, this did not prevent it from re-surfacing in a pivotal role in Jean Laplanche’s structural-linguistic accounts of “the drive to translate” and of the translation model of (...)
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  30.  11
    The “Relations of Affect” and “the Spiritual”.Brian Lightbody - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):163-181.
    In his book Foucault and Religion, Jeremy Carrette presents a compelling argument against Foucault’s genealogical method (what he terms “relations of force”). In brief, Carrette holds that while Foucault’s genealogical method effectively unmasked the origins of “rationality” and “madness,” it was less successful when explaining the materialization of “the spiritual.” Foucault’s analysis of spiritual practices is at best functional and, according to Carrette, fails to explain the psychophysical state of subjects engaged in religious customs. In the following paper, I argue (...)
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  31.  5
    Human Rights and the Vulnerability of Rights-Bearers.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):49-67.
    I seek to understand the relationship between human vulnerability and human rights as something more than a problem that respect for human rights solves. After characterizing vulnerability and noting that human rights are generally regarded as entitlements that respect the dignity of persons by securing their autonomous agency, I draw out the implications of these premises. I argue that human vulnerabilities are constitutive of the capacity for autonomous agency and therefore that the circumstances of respect for persons must include persons’ (...)
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  32.  6
    A Physics of Thought.Florian Vermeiren - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (1):145-162.
    In What Is Philosophy? Deleuze and Guattari understand concepts in a very unconventional way. One of the central aspects of their theory is that concepts are self-referential and should not be understood in terms of any form of reference or representation. Instead, concepts are complex “assemblages” interacting on a “plane of immanence.” I argue that we can best understand this theory through the philosophy of Spinoza. The latter understands thought and ideas through the model of physical bodies. Spinoza’s theory of (...)
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