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  1.  3
    Geschlecht Pollachos Legetai.Geoffrey Bennington - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):423-439.
    At an important moment in his reading of Heidegger in Geschlecht III, Derrida wields a pair of semi-technical terms from his own earlier work, and uses them to identify a classical, indeed Aristotelian, vein in Heidegger’s reading of Trakl. This gesture is complex, both in that, in spite of appearances, the Mehrdeutigkeit Heidegger identifies in Trakl is not essentially to do with the term Geschlecht, and in that Derrida’s presentation of Aristotle’s views about polysemia is perhaps over-simplified, or at least (...)
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  2.  1
    Jacques Derrida, Geschlecht III: Sex, Race, Nation, Humanity, Ed. Geoffrey Bennington, Katie Chenoweth, and Rodrigo Therezo.Benjamin Brewer - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):467-475.
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  3.  1
    Introduction: Reading Geschlecht III.Katie Chenoweth & Rodrigo Therezo - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):275-279.
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  4.  1
    John Lysaker.Megan Craig - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):507-517.
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  5.  2
    Review of Werner Hamacher, Keinmaleins: Texte Zu Celan. [REVIEW]Alexander Crist - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):491-494.
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  6.  2
    Tasks of Philosophy in the Present Age.Hans-Georg Gadamer, Cynthia Nielsen & Ian Alexander Moore - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):477-484.
    This is a translation of Hans-Georg Gadamer’s recently discovered 1952 Berlin speech. The speech includes several themes that reappear in Truth and Method, as well as in Gadamer’s later writings such as Reason in the Age of Science. For example, Gadamer criticizes positivism, modern philosophy’s orientation toward positivism, and Enlightenment narratives of progress, while presenting his view of philosophy’s tasks in an age of crisis. In addition, he discusses structural power, instrumental reason, the objectification of nature and human beings, the (...)
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  7.  10
    The Story of the Two Revolutions.Jürgen Habermas & Nicolas Schneider - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):485-490.
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  8.  5
    More Than a Language to Come.Samir Haddad - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):379-394.
    In this paper I demonstrate that the analysis supporting Derrida’s identification of the desire for a pure, originary idiom in Heidegger’s reading of Trakl in Geschlecht III provides a framework with which we can understand the call for a new language in Monolingualism of the Other. While acknowledging how his interpretation of Heidegger provides important insights that guide Derrida’s later negotiation with the dual dangers of nationalism and colonialism, I argue that the proximity to Heidegger, manifest in Derrida’s articulation of (...)
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  9.  1
    ‘Étranger,’ Ou Plutôt ‘Fremd’: Philosophical-Poetic Nationalism in Derrida’s Geschlecht III and Beyond.Daniel Hoffman-Schwartz - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):361-378.
    This article takes up the specifically poetic dimension of what Jacques Derrida calls Martin Heidegger’s “philosophical nationalism” in the recently published Geschlecht III, arguing that this text doubles as a self-interrogation of Derrida’s own practice of reading poetry. Thus reading Geschlecht III alongside the nearly contemporaneous “Shibboleth: For Paul Celan,” I claim that Derrida’s critical deconstruction of Heidegger’s philosophical-poetic nationalism both allows us to read the traces of a more affirmatively deconstructive thinking of literary community in “Shibboleth” and draws attention (...)
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  10.  3
    How Not to Translate—the Untranslatable.Peggy Kamuf - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):411-422.
    This essay proceeds from the assertion that Derrida’s work has consistently been concerned with translation. This has been clearly evident since “Plato’s Pharmacy”. This concern comes to the fore in Geschlecht III, where countless features of Heidegger’s language are underscored as untranslatable. This does not prevent Derrida from proposing re-translations, of doing what he describes as “harassing” Heidegger’s language “with wave after wave of touches, caresses, and blows.” Untranslatability, as he argues here and elsewhere, is simply a matter of economy, (...)
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  11.  1
    Derrida, Heidegger, and the Magnetism of the Trakl House.David Farrell Krell - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):281-304.
    Derrida’s seminar “The Phantom of the Other”, reads Heidegger’s “Language in the Poem”, which has the poetry of Georg Trakl at its center. Among the principal themes of Derrida’s seminar and/or of Heidegger’s essay are Heidegger’s effort to “place” Trakl’s presumably single, unsung poem; the relation of pain to poetry; the two “strokes” of Geschlecht, a word that in part means the sexes, the first stroke being neutral, the second being evil; the German language and the Heideggerian idiom; philosophical nationalities (...)
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  12.  1
    Matter and Manners.John Lysaker - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):519-527.
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  13.  1
    Still (Un)Born: Derrida, Heidegger, Trakl.Elissa Marder - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):343-360.
    This essay traces the pivotal—although largely unspoken—relation between the mother and language in Derrida’s reading of Heidegger’s reading of Trakl in Geschlecht III. Derrida’s gloss of the “idiom” in Heidegger’s text leads to a reflection on the language of gestation through the family of words linking “tragen” to “austragen”. Following Derrida, the essay proposes that Heidegger’s conception of the time of the “unborn” in his essay “Language in the Poem” is the time of the promise and the promise of a (...)
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  14.  30
    Tasks of Philosophy in the Present Age RIAS-Lecture, June 9, 1952.Cynthia R. Nielsen & Ian Alexander Moore - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):1-8.
    Translators’ Abstract: This is a translation of Hans-Georg Gadamer’s recently discovered 1952 Berlin speech. The speech includes several themes that reappear in Truth and Method, as well as in Gadamer’s later writings such as Reason in the Age of Science. For example, Gadamer criticizes positivism, modern philosophy’s orientation toward positivism, and Enlightenment narratives of progress, while presenting his view of philosophy’s tasks in an age of crisis. In addition, he discusses structural power, instrumental reason, the objectification of nature and human (...)
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  15.  5
    Sexual Difference and Gathering in Geschlecht III.François Raffoul - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):325-341.
    Derrida states at the beginning of Geschlecht III that at stake is the question of sexual difference, one that is referred in Heidegger’s 1953 essay on Trakl to a twofoldness that precedes the opposition of sexual duality, a duality which, according to Derrida, neutralizes sexual difference. I follow the development of what Derrida also called the “dream” of “another sexual difference,” one that would not be ruled by the opposition of the two. Derrida’s guiding interpretation in Geschlecht III is that (...)
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  16.  4
    Debt as a Form of Life.Andrea Rossi - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):495-506.
    This article is a review of two recently translated books by Italian philoso­pher Elettra Stimilli: The Debt of the Living: Ascesis and Capitalism and Debt and Guilt: A Political Philosophy. The essay critically engages with Stimilli’s interpretation of the nexus between ascesis and capitalism; her account of the ascetic dimensions of contemporary economies of debt; her reflections on the subversive potential of ascesis in the context of contemporary regimes of neoliberal governance.
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  17. Das Harte Geschlecht.Christian Sommer - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):441-449.
    This article suggests that the deconstruction of Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin in the Letter on Humanism is a precondition for what Derrida attempts to do in his commentary of Heidegger’s reading of Trakl in Geschlecht III. This preliminary deconstruction, through a constellation of Hölderlinian motifs, controls the topology of Geschlecht III and determines Derrida’s approach to the themes of “nationality” and “philosophical nationalism”.
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  18.  1
    Das Harte Geschlecht.Christian Sommer - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):441-449.
    This article suggests that the deconstruction of Heidegger’s reading of Hölderlin in the Letter on Humanism is a precondition for what Derrida attempts to do in his commentary of Heidegger’s reading of Trakl in Geschlecht III. This preliminary deconstruction, through a constellation of Hölderlinian motifs, controls the topology of Geschlecht III and determines Derrida’s approach to the themes of “nationality” and “philosophical nationalism”.
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  19.  1
    The Phoenix and National Humanism in Hegel, Heidegger, and Derrida.Rodrigo Therezo - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):305-323.
    This paper tracks Derrida’s allusion to the “phoenix motif” in the recently published Life Death seminar, showing how it foreshadows and overlaps with the political problematic of “national humanism” made explicit in Geschlecht III. I argue that, be it in Hegel, Fichte, Nietzsche, or Heidegger, biological life is always in the service of a spiritual life that finds its breath in a certain reappropriation of the German idiom. Following Derrida, I argue that this “philosophy-of-life German” introduces a sinister equivocality between (...)
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  20.  3
    Animal D’Archive: On the Tracks of Derrida’s Writing.Francesco Vitale - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):395-409.
    The article seeks to outline the relationship between Geschlecht III and Jacques Derrida’s published texts devoted to the mark “Geschlecht,” in order to detect the general strategy followed by Derrida in the construction of his archive during his lifetime. Indeed, we suppose that his archive has to be built in accordance with his deconstructive statements about the classical conception of the archive: a totalizing closure of a textual production able to trace it back to the unity of an ideal identity. (...)
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  21. Which Way Back (Way Back)?David Wills - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (2):451-465.
    This essay considers together two recent posthumous publications by Derrida: Geschlecht III, and La vie la mort, both of which raise questions concerning translation. In Geschlecht III that is first of all the problem of how to translate the German word, how Heidegger’s reading of Trakl profits from, or loses in its translation, and how Derrida’s reading of Heidegger either does or does not translate Heidegger’s own interpretive practice. Reference to La vie la mort enables analysis of Benjamin’s concept of (...)
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  22. “The Great Burden” of Religion.Stefano Bancalari - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):173-184.
    This article aims to reread Jonas’s famous lecture on “Heidegger and Theology” linking it with a still unpublished lecture course on Being and Time Jonas held in 1967 at the New School for Social Research. From the reading of Heidegger’s masterwork, Jonas takes the idea of the “burdensome” character of the existence, which he interprets in terms of a “polarity” between man and his “other”. Such a polarity is for Jonas the very essence of “religion” and of responsibility. From this (...)
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  23.  2
    Fred Evans, Public Art and the Fragility of Democracy: An Essay in Political Aesthetics.Edward S. Casey - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):255-263.
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  24.  1
    Alain Badiou, Plato’s Republic: A Dialogue in Sixteen Chapters, Trans. Susan Spitzer.Benjamin Cherry-Smith - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):273-274.
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  25.  2
    Freud and Merleau-Ponty on the (Sexual) Experience of the Child.Hans-Georg Eilenberger - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):137-157.
    In this essay, I read Freud and Merleau-Ponty as voices for a more perceptive and nuanced discourse on the child. Their works, I suggest, contain two complementary approaches in this direction. The first approach concerns the structural asymmetry of child and adult. In his early writings, Freud assumes a radical break between the child’s and the adult’s sexualities. Taking seriously this assumption of asymmetry cautions us against the hasty application of adult standards to the child. The second approach concerns what (...)
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  26.  2
    Anamorphosis and Subjectivity in the Space of Reasons.Dominik Finkelde - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):117-136.
    Jacques Lacan comments repeatedly on anamorphic art as it exemplifies for him how the mind from a certain angle perceives through law-like patterns the world that would otherwise be nothing but a chaos of arbitrary multiplicities. The angle, though, has a certain effect on what is perceived; an effect that, as such, cannot be perceived within the realm of experience. The article tries to make the link between diffraction laws of perception more explicit in the subject-object dichotomy and refers for (...)
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  27.  3
    The Triumph of Theological Economics.Adrian Johnston - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):3-50.
    Both Marx and Freud are children of the Enlightenment in certain manners. As such, they each display a qualified but firm optimism about history inevitably making progress in specific desirable directions. Freud predicts that continuing scientific and technological advances eventually will drive religiosity from human societies once and for all. Marx likewise forecasts the withering away of religions. Moreover, he treats this predicted process as symptomatic of even more fundamental socioeconomic developments, namely, his famous anticipations of subsequent transitions to socialism (...)
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  28.  2
    The Triumph of Theological Economics.Adrian Johnston - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):3-50.
    Both Marx and Freud are children of the Enlightenment in certain manners. As such, they each display a qualified but firm optimism about history inevitably making progress in specific desirable directions. Freud predicts that continuing scientific and technological advances eventually will drive religiosity from human societies once and for all. Marx likewise forecasts the withering away of religions. Moreover, he treats this predicted process as symptomatic of even more fundamental socioeconomic developments, namely, his famous anticipations of subsequent transitions to socialism (...)
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  29.  4
    Spinoza.Joshua Kerr - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):239-253.
    Spinoza has very little to say concerning the creative arts. A careful consideration of those passages in which he discusses art, however, reveals art to have an importance for him that far outstrips what his relative silence might suggest. In this paper, I argue that Spinoza situates art at the genesis of rational, philosophical knowledge. The importance of abstract reason, Spinoza’s “second kind” of knowledge to which most of philosophy belongs, has been well appreciated by scholars. In the Ethics, Spinoza (...)
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  30.  1
    Dimitris Vardoulakis, Freedom From Free Will: Kafka and Laughter.Gregg Lambert - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):265-271.
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  31.  72
    Humor, Contempt, and the Exemption From Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):205-220.
    Building on the theory of humor advanced by Yves Cusset in his recent book Rire: Tractatus philo-comicus, I argue that we can understand the phenomenon in terms of what Jean-Luc Nancy, following Roland Barthes, has called the exemption from sense. I attempt to show how the humorous sensibility, understood in this way, is entirely incompatible with the experience of others as contemptible. I conclude by developing some of the normative implications of this, focusing specifically on the question whether it is (...)
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  32.  2
    Towards a Post-Postmodern Philosophy of Play.Ronald McKinney - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):159-171.
    This essay strives to show the relationship between current efforts to explain the nature of play and the essence of post-postmodernism. The muddied and arduous world of work becomes the site not only for creative play but for post-postmodern solutions to the complex situations we find ourselves in today.
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  33. Introduction.Jeta Mulaj - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):1-2.
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  34.  6
    Universal History and Immanent Critique in Anti-Oedipus.Duy Lap Nguyen - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):51-76.
    This essay considers Deleuze and Guattari’s paradoxical claim that Marx’s critique of political economy implies as a universal history derived from the singular features of capitalism. In this critique, capitalism is defined by the commodity form, as a relationship of economic equivalence that replaces the bonds of dependence underlying other social formations. By negating relations of kinship and caste, capitalism reveals, a contrario, the universal foundation of other societies. As the “negative of all social formations,” capitalism conditions a universal history, (...)
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  35.  4
    The Problem of History and the Three Movements of Existence in Patočka on the Basis of an Appropriation of Arendt’s Anthropology.Eric Pommier & D. J. S. Cross - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):185-203.
    Jan Patočka holds that both the Husserlian and the Heideggerian descriptions of history remain abstract because they lack an authentic reflection on historical sense’s appearing, which presupposes a description of the transition from the nonhistorical and prehistorical states of humanity to its final historical state. Nevertheless, it seems that Patočka would confront an internal aporia here because, even if he sought to think the continuity of these three movements, he tends to affirm the rupture between them. To overcome that aporia, (...)
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  36.  9
    Towards a Compositional Model of Ideology.Jennifer Ponce de León & Gabriel Rockhill - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):95-116.
    This article sets forth a compositional model of ideology by drawing on the tradition of historical materialism and further developing its insights into the aesthetic composition of reality. It demonstrates how ideology is not simply a set of false beliefs but is rather the process by which social agents are composed over time in every dimension of their existence, including their thoughts, practices, perceptions, representations, values, affects, desires, and unconscious drives. By working through a number of diverse debates and authors—ranging (...)
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  37.  9
    Conscious Organs.Jason Read - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):77-93.
    In Volume Three of Capital in a striking but somewhat uncharacteristic formula, Marx argues that the labor relation is the “hidden basis” of the entire social edifice including the state and politics. As an attempt to clarify and develop this insight I examine the dual nature of labor as abstract and concrete labor, arguing that the two sides of labor correspond not just to two sides of the commodity, but to different ethics and alienations of labor, and ultimately to different (...)
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  38.  7
    The Controversy About Sloterdijk’s "Rules for the Human Zoo".Norman Schultz - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):221-238.
    The so-called Menschenpark-debate on genetic engineering—originating in 1999—turned out to be one of the most controversial and contentious debates in German philosophy. It is also regarded as the first manifestation of the struggle between Sloterdijk and Habermas. While Sloterdijk’s ideas had a significant impact on Habermas’s theory, Sloterdijk’s philosophy has been consistently ignored and dismissed until today due to two reasons. First, he was accused of advocating for fascist ideology. Second, philosophers from the same academic circles claimed that his method (...)
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