Authors
Angela Breitenbach
Cambridge University
Abstract
In this paper I discuss two questions. What does Kant understand by mechanical explanation in the Critique of judgment? And why does he think that mechanical explanation is the only type of the explanation of nature available to us? According to the interpretation proposed, mechanical explanations in the Critique of judgment refer to a particular species of empirical causal laws. Mechanical laws aim to explain nature by reference to the causal interaction between the forces of the parts of matter and the way in which they form into complex material wholes. Just like any other empirical causal law, however, mechanical laws can never be known with full certainty. The conception according to which we can explain all of nature by means of mechanical laws, it turns out, is based on what Kant calls ‘regulative’ or ‘reflective’ considerations about nature. Nothing in Kant’s Critique of judgment suggests that these considerations can ever be justified by reference to how the natural world really is. I suggest that what, upon first consideration, appears to be a thoroughly mechanistic conception of nature in Kant is much more limited than one might have expected
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DOI 10.1016/j.shpsc.2006.09.001
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References found in this work BETA

Critique of Pure Reason.I. Kant - 1787/1998 - Philosophy 59 (230):555-557.
Critique of Judgment.Immanuel Kant - 1790 - Barnes & Noble.

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Citations of this work BETA

Organisms as Natural Purposes: The Contemporary Evolutionary Perspective.D. M. Walsh - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):771-791.
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Organisms as Natural Purposes: The Contemporary Evolutionary Perspective.D. M. Walsh - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):771-791.
Kant's Concept of Natural Purpose and the Reflecting Power of Judgement.Joan Steigerwald - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):712-734.
Synthetic Biology and its Alternatives. Descartes, Kant and the Idea of Engineering Biological Machines.Werner Kogge & Michael Richter - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (2):181-189.

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