LIFE AFTER DEATH IN YORUBA ONTOLOGY: A CRITIQUE

Abstract
This paper is a reflection on the puzzle of life after death. It explores the meaning, types and causes of death so as to contemplate the purpose of life. Thus, the paper takes into consideration metaphysical, moral and epistemic issues in the belief in life after death (or life after life). This exploration is done considering the Yoruba philosophy of death (iku), life (iye) and life after death (aye atun wa). We note that, for the Yoruba, life as seen in the body is ephemeral, whereas death (that is, the separation of the soul from the body—iku ara) is a transitory process of life to a renewed life. The paper shows that the Yoruba’s idea of death is not an end to life but a change in its form. It is argued, then, that the Yoruba ontology has the implications that: (a) life is a continuum and, (b) man is not his body, (c) hence, a theory of immortality of the soul is implied. The paper observes that, though certain contradictions exist in the Yoruba worldview, the ethos of the belief seems significant. The paper examines the notions of imo (knowledge) and igbabo (belief) in Yoruba epistemology and thus advances the thesis that their belief in life after death cannot be corroborated, though not unreasonable
Keywords Belief,  Death,  Knowledge,  Life after death,   Ontology,   Yoruba
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
Edit this record
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Mark as duplicate
Request removal from index
Revision history
Download options
Our Archive
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Questionable but Unquestioned Beliefs: A Call for a Critical Examination of Yoruba Culture.O. R. Taye - 2013 - Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 5 (2):81-101.
The Yoruba Conceptions of Human Nature: A Philosophical Approach.Segun Ogungbemi - 1984 - Dissertation, The University of Texas at Dallas
Unscrambling of Life and Death of Confucius.Zhongqi Yang - 2008 - Philosophy and Culture 35 (3):167-179.
Reflections on Society, Medicine and Death.Anne Moates - 2006 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 12 (2):9.
The Phenomenon of Death.Edith Wyschogrod - 1973 - New York: Harper & Row.
Death: 'Nothing' Gives Insight.Eric J. Ettema - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):575-585.
A Little Dialogue On Life And Death.Fulvio Tessitore - 2010 - Archivio di Storia Della Cultura 23.
Is Man the Phoenix? A Study of Immortality.Bruce Reichenbach - 1978 - William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
Does Death Give Meaning to Life?Brooke Alan Trisel - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (2):62-81.
A Genealogy of Life and Death.Tyson E. Lewis - 2013 - Radical Philosophy Review 16 (1):237-252.
Current Debate on the Ethical Issues of Brain Death.Masahiro Morioka - 2004 - Proceedings of International Congress on Ethical Issues in Brain Death and Organ Transplantation:57-59.
Added to PP index
2016-01-20

Total downloads
418 ( #7,388 of 2,235,837 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
93 ( #3,159 of 2,235,837 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Monthly downloads
My notes
Sign in to use this feature