Gender, ‘race’, poverty, health and discourses of health reform in the context of globalization: a postcolonial feminist perspective in policy research

Nursing Inquiry 7 (4):220-229 (2000)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Gender, ‘race’, poverty, health and discourses of health reform in the context of globalization: a postcolonial feminist perspective in policy researchIn this paper, I draw on extant literature and my empirical work to discuss the impact of globalization and healthcare reform on the lives of women — those from countries of the South as well as of the North. First, I review briefly the economic hardships identified in different sectors of the population that have been attributed to how globalization is now working. Second, I examine what these global processes mean for health, with particular focus on poverty, gender, racialization and health. Third, I reflect on how nurse scientists might develop research agendas in the 21st century that would foster social transformation and social justice for all people. The position taken here is not an indictment of globalization. Rather, I argue that globalization is a fact in all of our lives. There are positive aspects of globalization. There are also negative aspects which we must collectively address, given that the issues identified can have deleterious consequences for the world’s poor, women in particular. I suggest that, to construct knowledge for practice and praxis, research agendas of the future should be inclusive of subaltern voices. I argue that drawing on a postcolonial feminist epistemology might help us to define such agendas, and express the multilayered sociopolitical contexts of health and illness in advocacy with policy‐makers.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 93,127

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Feminist bioethics in the global scene: The case of Kenya as a developing nation.John Otieno Ouko - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):59-70.
Is Globalization Good for Women?Alison M. Jaggar - 2001 - Comparative Literature 53 (4):298-314.
Transnational women's collectivities and global justice.Hye-Ryoung Kang - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (3):359-377.

Analytics

Added to PP
2014-01-26

Downloads
49 (#334,241)

6 months
13 (#219,908)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?