Authors
Andrew Sneddon
University of Ottawa
Abstract
This paper evaluates Sara Goering’s recent attempt to use the Rawlsian notion of the veil of ignorance as a tool for distinguishing permissible from impermissible forms of genetic engineering. I argue that her article fails due to a failure to include vital contextual information in the right way
Keywords genetic engineering  medical ethics  Rawls
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Reprint years 2006
DOI 10.1017/S096318010606004X
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