“Group Rights” and Racial Affirmative Action

The Journal of Ethics 15 (3):265-280 (2011)
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Abstract

This article argues against the view that affirmative action is wrong because it involves assigning group rights. First, affirmative action does not have to proceed by assigning rights at all. Second, there are, in fact, legitimate “group rights” both legal and moral; there are collective rights—which are exercised by groups—and membership rights—which are rights people have in virtue of group membership. Third, there are continuing harms that people suffer as blacks and claims to remediation for these harms can fairly treat the (social) property of being black as tracking the victims of those harms. Affirmative action motivated in this way aims to respond to individual wrongs; wrongs that individuals suffer, as it happens, in virtue of their membership in groups. Finally, the main right we have when we are being considered for jobs and places at colleges is that we be treated according to procedures that are morally defensible. Morally acceptable procedures sometimes take account of the fact that a person is a member of a certain social group.

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Kwame Anthony Appiah
New York University

Citations of this work

Group agents and moral status: what can we owe to organizations?Adam Lovett & Stefan Riedener - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (3):221–238.
Nonideal Justice as Nonideal Fairness.Marcus Arvan - 2019 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 5 (2):208-228.
Affirmative action.Robert Fullinwider - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Racial Justice.Andrew Valls - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (2):e12722.

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References found in this work

The Ethics of Identity.Kwame Anthony Appiah - 2005 - Princeton University Press.
Harm to Others.Joel Feinberg - 1987 - Oxford University Press USA.
Harm to Others.Martin P. Golding - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (2):295-298.
The Ethics of Identity.[author unknown] - 2006 - Philosophy 81 (317):539-542.

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