Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1974)

Abstract
Ariès traces Western man's attitudes toward mortality from the early medieval conception of death as the familiar collective destiny of the human race to the modern tendency, so pronounced in industrial societies, to hide death as if it were an embarrassing family secret.
Keywords Death
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Reprint years 1975
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Call number BD444.A6713
ISBN(s) 0801817625   0801815665   0714525510   9780801817625
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