Reason and Reality in an Era of Conspiracy


Authors
Stephen Asma
Columbia College Chicago
Abstract
Conspiracy theories are on the rise. Some explanations suggest that they are caused by reduced or limited information streams --limited access to information. This article argues instead that information is more accessible than ever and an abundance of information is itself problematic if informal reasoning skills are impoverished. David Hume's claim that unfocused skepticism leads paradoxically to greater gullibility is examined. And the conspiratorial dimensions of Creationism are evaluated.
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