Environmental Ethics 40 (3):283-296 (2018)

Authors
J. Spencer Atkins
State University of New York at Binghamton
Abstract
Much of the climate ethics discussion centers on considerations of compensatory justice and historical accountability. However, little attention is given to supporting and defending the Beneficiary Pays Principle as a guide for policymaking. This principle states that those who have benefitted from an instance of harm have an obligation to compensate those who have been harmed. Thus, this principle implies that those benefitted by industrialization and carbon emission owe compensation to those who have been harmed by climate change. Beneficiary Pays is commonly juxtaposed with Polluter Pays Principle and the Ability to Pay Principle in the relevant literature. Beneficiary Pays withstands objections that raise suspicion for the latter two.
Keywords Polluter Pays Principle  Climate Change  Beneficiary Pay Principle  Social and Political Philosophy  Ability to Pay Principle  Compensation  Reparations
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ISBN(s) 0163-4275
DOI 10.5840/enviroethics201840325
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