Cornell University Press (1986)

Authors
Robert N. Audi
University of Notre Dame
Abstract
This book is unified by three broad concerns: the rationality of belief in God, the relation between religion and morality, and the explication of the concept of God. The essays are, however, marked by diversity. Some focus on historical figures, such as Aquinas and Locke; others bring recent epistemological and metaphysical developments to bear on problems of religious belief. Some of the papers explore neglected issues central to religious practice, such as the question of how total devotion to God can permit other deep commitments; others apply philosophical distinctions from within a religious tradition, for example, in setting out a Christian approach to the problem of evil.
Keywords Religion Philosophy
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Call number BL51.R295 1986
ISBN(s) 0801418569   0801493811
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The Problem of Evil.Michael Tooley - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
The Epistemology of Religion.Peter Forrest - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Theological Voluntarism.Mark Murphy - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

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