Abstract
The principle of respect for autonomy requires informing patients adequately and appropriately about diagnoses, treatments, and prognoses. However, some clinical cases may cause ethical dilemmas regarding telling the truth. Under the existence especially of certain cultural, social, and religious circumstances, disclosing all the relevant information to all pertinent parties might create harmful effects. Even though the virtue of telling the truth is unquestionable, sometimes de facto conditions compel physicians to act paternalistically to protect the patient/patients from imminent dangers. This article, which aims to study the issue of whether a physician should always tell the truth, analyzes an interesting case that represents the detection of misattributed paternity during pre-transplant tests for a kidney transplant from the son to the father in Turkey, where social, cultural, and religious factors have considerable impact on marital infidelity. After analyzing the concept of telling the truth and its relationship with paternalism and two major ethical theories, consequentialism and deontology, it is concluded that the value of the integrity of life and survival overrides the value of telling the truth. For this reason, in the case of a high possibility of severe and imminent threats, withholding some information is ethically justifiable.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1007/s11019-017-9779-9
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 68,908
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

The Birth of Bioethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
Hippocratic, Religious, and Secular Ethics: The Points of Conflict.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.

View all 11 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Bertrand Russell and Logical Truth.Matthew Mckeon - 1999 - Philosophia 27 (3-4):541-553.
Deflationary Truth and Truth-Biology.Margo Laasberg - 2008 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 1 (2):265-283.
Should Physicians Fake Diagnoses to Help Their Patients?G. Helgesson & N. Lynoe - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):133-136.
Models and the Locus of Their Truth.Uskali Mäki - 2011 - Synthese 180 (1):47 - 63.
What Were Tarski's Truth-Definitions For?John F. Fox - 1989 - History and Philosophy of Logic 10 (2):165-179.
Rereading `Truth and Politics'.Ronald Beiner - 2008 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (1-2):123-136.
Weighing the Risks: Stalemate in the Classical/Balance Controversy.John Beatty - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (3):289-319.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2017-05-29

Total views
25 ( #452,573 of 2,497,711 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #428,657 of 2,497,711 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes