Linguistics and Philosophy 22 (4):327-366 (1999)

Authors
Kent Bach
San Francisco State University
Abstract
Grice’s distinction between what is said and what is implicated has greatly clarified our understanding of the boundary between semantics and pragmatics. Although border disputes still arise and there are certain difficulties with the distinction itself (see the end of §1), it is generally understood that what is said falls on the semantic side and what is implicated on the pragmatic side. But this applies only to what is..
Keywords Linguistics   Philosophy of Language   Artificial Intelligence   Computational Linguistics   Semantics   Syntax
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Reprint years 2004
DOI 10.1023/a:1005466020243
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Slurring Perspectives.Elisabeth Camp - 2013 - Analytic Philosophy 54 (3):330-349.

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