Neuroethics 7 (1):43-50 (2014)

Abstract
Advances in technology are bringing greater insight into the mind, raising a host of privacy concerns. However, the basic psychological mechanisms underlying the perception of privacy violations are poorly understood. Here, we explore the relation between the perception of privacy violations and access to information related to one’s “self.” In two studies using demographically diverse samples, we find that privacy violations resulting from various monitoring technologies are mediated by the extent to which the monitoring is thought to provide access to self-relevant information, and generally neuromonitoring did not rate among the more invasive monitoring types. However, brain monitoring was judged to be more of a privacy violation when described as providing access to self-relevant information than when no such access was possible, and control participants did not judge the invasiveness of neuromonitoring any differently than those told it provided no access to self-relevant information
Keywords Privacy  Self  Neuroethics  Self-identity  Neuromonitoring
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DOI 10.1007/s12152-013-9181-0
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References found in this work BETA

Privacy, Morality, and the Law.W. A. Parent - 1983 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (4):269-288.
Privacy: Its Meaning and Value.Adam D. Moore - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (3):215 - 227.
Brain Imaging and Privacy.Juha Räikkä - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (1):5-12.

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