Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008)

Authors
Jeffrey Barrett
University of California, Irvine
Abstract
Everett's relative-state formulation of quantum mechanics is an attempt to solve the measurement problem by dropping the collapse dynamics from the standard von Neumann-Dirac theory of quantum mechanics. The main problem with Everett's theory is that it is not at all clear how it is supposed to work. In particular, while it is clear that he wanted to explain why we get determinate measurement results in the context of his theory, it is unclear how he intended to do this. There have been many attempts to reconstruct Everett's no-collapse theory in order to account for the apparent determinateness of measurement outcomes. These attempts have led to such formulations of quantum mechanics as the many-worlds, many-minds, many-histories, and relative-fact theories. Each of these captures part of what Everett claimed for his theory, but each also encounters problems.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 54,431
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Probability in the Everett Interpretation.Hilary Greaves - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):109–128.
Entanglement and Disentanglement in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 48 (2):168-174.
Everett’s Pure Wave Mechanics and the Notion of Worlds.Jeffrey A. Barrett - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):277-302.
Hilbert Space Quantum Mechanics is Noncontextual.Robert B. Griffiths - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (3):174-181.

View all 28 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
104 ( #92,296 of 2,371,809 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #557,530 of 2,371,809 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes