Informal Logic 41 (1):41-55 (2021)

Authors
Michael D. Baumtrog
Ryerson University
Abstract
In 1970 the voting age in Canada changed from 21 to 18. Since then, there have been calls to lower it further, most commonly to age 16. Against the motion, however, it has been argued that youth may lack the ability to exercise a mature and informed vote. This paper argues against that worry and shows how restricting youth from voting on the basis of a misbelief about their abilities amounts to an epistemic injustice.
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DOI 10.22329/il.v41i1.6691
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References found in this work BETA

Thinking, Fast and Slow.Daniel Kahneman - 2011 - New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
The Epistemic Challenge of Hearing Child’s Voice.Karin Murris - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):245-259.
Kids, Culture and Innocents.David A. Goode - 1986 - Human Studies 9 (1):83 - 106.

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