Health care ethics consultation: 'Training in virtue' [Book Review]

Human Studies 22 (1):25-41 (1999)

Abstract

In philosophy, intelligence is less important than character, or so Wittgenstein once argued. In this paper, in a similar vein, I suggest that in health care ethics consultation character is of preeminent importance. I suggest that the activity of ethics consultation can be understood as "training in virtue," and what distinguishes the good health care ethics consultant from his/her average colleague are differences in traits of character. The underlying assumption is that one's use of knowledge and abilities are ultimately a function of who one is and how one perceives and confronts situations of moral uncertainty and conflict. In discussing the original case presented by Mark Bliton, I focus on the virtues of wisdom, justice, courage, compassion and humility

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Françoise Baylis
Dalhousie University

Citations of this work

Conflicting Stories of Virtue in UK Healthcare: Bringing Together Organisational Studies and Ethics.David Dawson - 2009 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 18 (2):95-109.
Afterword.Richard M. Zaner - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (1):99-116.
Dare to Care.Anita Calvert - 2019 - Disputatio Philosophica 20 (1):25-43.
Rebuttal: Expert Ethics Testimony.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):240-242.

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