Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):669-673 (2010)

Abstract
Modifying images for scientific publication is now quick and easy due to changes in technology. This has created a need for new image processing guidelines and attitudes, such as those offered to the research community by Doug Cromey (Cromey 2010). We suggest that related changes in technology have simplified the task of detecting misconduct for journal editors as well as researchers, and that this simplification has caused a shift in the responsibility for reporting misconduct. We also argue that the concept of best practices in image processing can serve as a general model for education in best practices in research
Keywords Misconduct  Image processing  RCR  Best practices  Ethical thinking  Ethics in science
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DOI 10.1007/s11948-010-9226-2
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Image Manipulation as Research Misconduct.Debra Parrish & Bridget Noonan - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):161-167.

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Image Manipulation as Research Misconduct.Debra Parrish & Bridget Noonan - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):161-167.
An Introduction to Research Ethics.Paul J. Friedman - 1996 - Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):443-456.

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