Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):1-26 (2008)

Authors
Hagit Benbaji
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Abstract
It is sometimes claimed that ordinary objects, such as mountains and chairs, are not material in their own right, but only in virtue of the fact that they are constituted by matter. As Fine puts it, they are “onlyderivatively material”. In this paper I argue that invoking “constitution” to account for the materiality of things that are not material in their own right explains nothing and renders the admission that these objects are indeed material completely mysterious. Although there may be metaphysical contexts in which mysterianism can be accepted with equanimity, I further argue, the question of the materiality of quotidian objects is not one of them
Keywords Analytic Philosophy  Contemporary Philosophy  General Interest
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ISBN(s) 0038-4283
DOI 10.1111/j.2041-6962.2008.tb00067.x
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References found in this work BETA

What is It Like to Be a Bat?Thomas Nagel - 1974 - Philosophical Review 83 (October):435-50.
Mind and World.John McDowell - 1994 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Thinking About Consciousness.David Papineau - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.

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Constitution and Dependence.David Mark Kovacs - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy 117 (3):150-177.

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