Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):449-460 (2011)

Abstract
There is an unresolved paradox concerning the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in consumer behavior. On the one hand, consumers demand more and more CSR information from corporations. On the other hand, research indicates a considerable gap between consumers’ apparent interest in CSR and the limited role of CSR in purchase behavior. This article attempts to shed light on this paradox by drawing on qualitative data from in-depth interviews. The findings show that the evaluation of CSR initiatives is a complex and hierarchically structured process, during which consumers distinguish between core, central, and peripheral factors. This article describes these factors in detail and explains the complexity of consumers’ assessment of CSR. These insights then serve as a basis for discussing the theoretical and managerial implications of the research findings. To this end, the article contributes to a better understanding of the role of CSR in consumption decisions.
Keywords Corporate social responsibility  Consumer behavior  Purchase intention  Qualitative research
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1007/s10551-011-0925-7
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 64,209
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

View all 11 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

View all 26 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Analytics

Added to PP index
2011-11-22

Total views
150 ( #71,872 of 2,455,351 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #449,153 of 2,455,351 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes