Sociological Theory 18 (3):343-367 (2000)

Abstract
Unlike older sciences such as physics and biology, sociology has never had a revolution. Modern sociology is still classical-largely psychological, teleological, and individualistic-and even less scientific than classical sociology. But pure sociology is different: It predicts and explains the behavior of social life with its location and direction in social space-its geometry. Here I Illustrate pure sociology with formulations about the behavior of ideas, including a theory of scienticity that predicts and explains the degree to which an idea is likely to be scientific (testable, general, simple, valid, and original). For example: Scienticity is a curvilinear function of social distance from the subject. This formulation explains numerous facts about the history and practice of science, such as why some sciences evolved earlier and faster than others and why so much sociology is so unscientific. Because scientific theory is the most scientific science, the theory of scienticity also implies a theory of theory and a methodology for the development of theory
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DOI 10.1111/0735-2751.00105
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References found in this work BETA

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.David Bohm - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):377-379.
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Max Weber.C. D. Burns - 1930 - International Journal of Ethics 41 (1):119-120.
Personal Knowledge: Towards a Post-Critical Philosophy.Louis Arnaud Reid - 1959 - British Journal of Educational Studies 8 (1):66.

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Citations of this work BETA

The Geometry of Terrorism.Donald Black - 2004 - Sociological Theory 22 (1):14-25.
Why is Collective Violence Collective?Roberta Senechal de la Roche - 2001 - Sociological Theory 19 (2):126-144.

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