Risdon Vale: Place, memory, and suburban experience

Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):299 – 311 (2008)
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Abstract

The author reflects upon the notions of personal memory, collective memory, myth, and evolved memory within her lived experience of Risdon Vale. These interrelated forms of memory influence understanding of place and sense of place. Personal memories corroborate and collaborate with intersubjective memories to inform collective memory. Both personal and collective memories are held within a fusion of cultural myths. Evolved memory binds us deeply within the history of the earth and the evolution of life. Risdon Vale provides fertile ground for considerations of place and memory. This former public housing suburb is adjacent to Risdon Cove, the site of first occupation by the British in 1803 and the site of the first massacre of Aboriginal Tasmanians in 1804

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Orientalism.Edward Said - 1979 - Vintage.
Invention, Memory, and Place.Edward W. Said - 2000 - Critical Inquiry 26 (2):175-192.
Ecospirituality and the blurred boundaries of humans, animals, and machine.Glen A. Mazis - 2007 - In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press. pp. 125--155.

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