Il Teeteto e il suo rapporto con il Cratilo

Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (1):27-48 (2020)
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Abstract

With the use of a particular metaphor, which appears at the end of the Cratylus and is taken up with perfect symmetry at the beginning of the Theaetetus, Plato certainly wanted to indicate the succession of Cratylus–Theaetetus as an order for reading the two dialogues, which Trasillus faithfully reproduced in structuring the second tetralogy of Platonic dialogues. The claim of the theory of ideas, with which the Cratylus ends, must therefore be considered the background in which to place not only the analysis of the name carried out in the Cratylus, but also the discussion and criticism of the epistemological theories examined and refuted in the Theaetetus. The transition from the discussion of the name to that of the logos is another important theoretical element that connects the two dialogues. Another one is the theory of knowledge, already precisely elaborated in the Cratylus, and taken up and deepened in the Theaetetus. Finally, the theme of false and error is a third theoretical element common to the two dialogues, which, starting from Euthydemus, finds its solution in the Sophist.

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References found in this work

Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher.Gregory Vlastos - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
The Sophistic Movement.G. B. Kerferd - 1981 - Cambridge University Press.
Thrasyllan Platonism.Harold Tarrant - 2020 - Cornell University Press.
The Sophists.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1969 - London: Cambridge University Press.

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