A proximate perspective on reciprocal altruism

Human Nature 13 (1):129-152 (2002)

Abstract
The study of reciprocal altruism, or the exchange of goods and services between individuals, requires attention to both evolutionary explanations and proximate mechanisms. Evolutionary explanations have been debated at length, but far less is known about the proximate mechanisms of reciprocity. Our own research has focused on the immediate causes and contingencies underlying services such as food sharing, grooming, and cooperation in brown capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees. Employing both observational and experimental techniques, we have come to distinguish three types of reciprocity. Symmetry-based reciprocity is cognitively the least complex form, based on symmetries inherent in dyadic relationships (e.g., mutual association, kinship). Attitudinal reciprocity, which is more cognitively complex, is based on the mirroring of social attitudes between partners and is exhibited by both capuchin monkeys and chimpanzees. Finally, calculated reciprocity, the most cognitively advanced form, is based on mental scorekeeping and is found only in humans and possibly chimpanzees
Keywords Capuchin monkeys  Chimpanzees  Cooperation  Food sharing  Primate grooming  Proximate mechanisms  Reciprocal altruism
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DOI 10.1007/s12110-002-1017-2
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The Evolution of Reciprocal Altruism.Robert Trivers - 1971 - Quarterly Review of Biology 46 (1):35-57.

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