Hypatia 14 (3):39-58 (1999)

Abstract
According to Kelly Oliver and Elizabeth Grosz, while Friedrich Nietzsche begins to open Western philosophy to the other, the body, he cuts off feminine body. Here I create a framework through which the possibility and questionability of a symbolically feminine body begins to emerge. I do this by using the metaphor of Indian curry. The metaphor works on two levels: 1) as a symbolically feminine body; 2) as Nietzsche's conception of subject-formation as a dynamic monism.
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DOI 10.1111/j.1527-2001.1999.tb01051.x
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References found in this work BETA

Of Grammatology.Jacques Derrida - 1982 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 15 (1):66-70.
Subjects of Desire.Judith Butler - 2000 - Philosophical Inquiry 22 (3):118-118.

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