The Ambivalence toward Teaching in the Early Years of the American Philosophical Association

Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):53-68 (2002)
Abstract
This paper investigates whether philosophers ever regarded the teaching of philosophy as a central concern by considering the first decades of professional associations that ultimately merged into the American Philosophical Association . Before the APA, philosophical education was mostly devoted to the development of the Christian gentleman. Upon its founding, the APA’s first president took the central functions of the APA to promote original investigation, publication, and collaboration, rather than teaching. Despite Creighton’s position that teaching should not play a role in the APA, an investigation of the early years of the APA show that philosophers had some, albeit infrequent, interest in pedagogical issues related to philosophy. Thus, it is argued that the early years of the APA reflect a deep ambivalence toward teaching
Keywords Teaching Philosophy
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ISBN(s) 0145-5788
DOI 10.5840/teachphil20022513
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