Private language

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2008)
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Abstract

cannot understand the language.”[1] This is not intended to cover (easily imaginable) cases of recording one's experiences in a personal code, for such a code, however obscure in fact, could in principle be deciphered. What Wittgenstein had in mind is a language conceived as necessarily comprehensible only to its single originator because the things which define its vocabulary are necessarily inaccessible to others

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Author's Profile

Stewart Candlish
University of Western Australia

References found in this work

Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1953 - New York, NY, USA: Wiley-Blackwell. Edited by G. E. M. Anscombe.
The Language of Thought.J. A. Fodor - 1978 - Critica 10 (28):140-143.
Wittgenstein on rules and private language.Saul A. Kripke - 1982 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 173 (4):496-499.
The New Wittgenstein.Alice Crary & Rupert J. Read (eds.) - 2000 - New York: Routledge.

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